Loose Woman

Loose Woman

4.2 5
by Sandra Cisneros
     
 

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A candid, sexy and wonderfully mood-strewn collection of poetry that celebrates the female aspects of love, from the reflective to the overtly erotic. "Poignant, sexy. . . lyrical, passionate. . . cool and delicate. . . hot as a chili pepper."—Boston Globe.

Overview

A candid, sexy and wonderfully mood-strewn collection of poetry that celebrates the female aspects of love, from the reflective to the overtly erotic. "Poignant, sexy. . . lyrical, passionate. . . cool and delicate. . . hot as a chili pepper."—Boston Globe.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The three parts of this spirited collection address the heart, ``spangled again and lopsided.'' In her second book of poems, Cisneros ( My Wicked Wicked Ways ) presents a street-smart, fearlessly liberated persona who raves, sometimes haphazardly, always with abandon, about the real thing: ``I am . . . / The lust goddess without guilt. / The delicious debauchery. You bring out / the primordial exquisiteness in me.'' As if breaking all the rules (``Because someone once / said Don't / do that! / you like to do it''), she delves with urgency into things carnal--sequins, cigars, black lace bras and menstrual blood. Readers of Cisneros's coming-of-age novel The House on Mango Street (which Knopf is reissuing in hardcover) will recognize the almost mythic undertow of her voice; it never weakens. We meet again a powerful, fiercely independent woman of Mexican heritage, though this time innocence has long been lost. For her the worlds of language and life are one and the same: ``Lorenzo, I forget what's real. / I mix up the details of what happened / with what I witnessed inside my / universe.'' These poems--short-lined, chantlike, biting--insistently rework the same themes to tap them. In the end, however, despite the accessible boldness of the writing, the poems lack the depth, the complexity and the lyrical magic of the author's fiction. QPB alternate; first serial to the New Yorker. (May)
Library Journal
``You bring out the Mexican in me./The hunkered thick dark spiral./The core of a heart howl./The bitter bile./The tequila lgrimas on Saturday all/through next weekend Sunday.'' In this typically direct, sensual, and bitingly colloquial poem, Cisneros is addressing a lover, but she might as well be addressing the act of writing itself, which clearly brings out the best in her, along with the passion she associates with her Mexican roots. As in Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories (LJ 4/1/91), one of LJ's Best Books of 1991, Cisneros deftly explores the consequences of being Hispanic and a woman-in particular, being the tough, independent free-spirited ``loose woman'' of her title. The poems that result are brilliant and shimmering and sharp-tongued and just occasionally a little too similar. Highly recommended where good poetry is read and essential for all Hispanic collections.-Barbara Hoffert, ``Library Journal''

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679755272
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/28/1995
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
259,338
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Cisneros was born in Chicago in 1954. Internationally acclaimed for her poetry and fiction, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lannan Literary Award and the American Book Award, and of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the MacArthur Foundation. Cisneros is the author of the novels The House on Mango Street and Caramelo, a collection of short stories Woman Hollering Creek, a book of poetry Loose Woman, and a children's book Hairs/Pelitos. She lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
San Antonio, Texas
Date of Birth:
December 20, 1954
Place of Birth:
Chicago, Illinois
Education:
B.A., Loyola University, 1976; M.F.A., University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, 1978

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Loose Woman 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
cathy-in-tucson More than 1 year ago
I relished this book of poems. The lines are palpable. I got the sense of the Mexican influence for sure. I could taste the words and feel the loves won and lost. I love the grit and the beauty in her words and the feelings they invoke. Fabulous!
dreamcatchera1a More than 1 year ago
Sanda Cisneros has hit this one out of the park. No one is as adept at making you cry, junp for joy, or scream out in anger. Her lyrical voice begs for attention. Although her Latina heritage peeps through from time to time, this collection is a must for every woman everywhere. So brush up on your Spanish so you dont miss the nuances and hold on tight. This is one ride you should take. All the more exciting because im a man.