Loose Woman: Poems

( 5 )

Overview

A candid, sexy and wonderfully mood-strewn collection of poetry that celebrates the female aspects of love, from the reflective to the overtly erotic. "Poignant, sexy. . . lyrical, passionate. . . cool and delicate. . . hot as a chili pepper."—Boston Globe.

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Loose Woman: Poems

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Overview

A candid, sexy and wonderfully mood-strewn collection of poetry that celebrates the female aspects of love, from the reflective to the overtly erotic. "Poignant, sexy. . . lyrical, passionate. . . cool and delicate. . . hot as a chili pepper."—Boston Globe.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The three parts of this spirited collection address the heart, ``spangled again and lopsided.'' In her second book of poems, Cisneros ( My Wicked Wicked Ways ) presents a street-smart, fearlessly liberated persona who raves, sometimes haphazardly, always with abandon, about the real thing: ``I am . . . / The lust goddess without guilt. / The delicious debauchery. You bring out / the primordial exquisiteness in me.'' As if breaking all the rules (``Because someone once / said Don't / do that! / you like to do it''), she delves with urgency into things carnal--sequins, cigars, black lace bras and menstrual blood. Readers of Cisneros's coming-of-age novel The House on Mango Street (which Knopf is reissuing in hardcover) will recognize the almost mythic undertow of her voice; it never weakens. We meet again a powerful, fiercely independent woman of Mexican heritage, though this time innocence has long been lost. For her the worlds of language and life are one and the same: ``Lorenzo, I forget what's real. / I mix up the details of what happened / with what I witnessed inside my / universe.'' These poems--short-lined, chantlike, biting--insistently rework the same themes to tap them. In the end, however, despite the accessible boldness of the writing, the poems lack the depth, the complexity and the lyrical magic of the author's fiction. QPB alternate; first serial to the New Yorker. (May)
Library Journal
``You bring out the Mexican in me./The hunkered thick dark spiral./The core of a heart howl./The bitter bile./The tequila lgrimas on Saturday all/through next weekend Sunday.'' In this typically direct, sensual, and bitingly colloquial poem, Cisneros is addressing a lover, but she might as well be addressing the act of writing itself, which clearly brings out the best in her, along with the passion she associates with her Mexican roots. As in Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories (LJ 4/1/91), one of LJ's Best Books of 1991, Cisneros deftly explores the consequences of being Hispanic and a woman-in particular, being the tough, independent free-spirited ``loose woman'' of her title. The poems that result are brilliant and shimmering and sharp-tongued and just occasionally a little too similar. Highly recommended where good poetry is read and essential for all Hispanic collections.-Barbara Hoffert, ``Library Journal''
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679755272
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/28/1995
  • Series: Vintage Contemporaries Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 216,473
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.97 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Cisneros

Sandra Cisneros was born in Chicago in 1954. Internationally acclaimed for her poetry and fiction, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lannan Literary Award and the American Book Award, and of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the MacArthur Foundation. Cisneros is the author of the novels The House on Mango Street and Caramelo, a collection of short stories Woman Hollering Creek, a book of poetry Loose Woman, and a children's book Hairs/Pelitos. She lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Biography

Sandra Cisneros' first novel, The House on Mango Street, brought an entirely new voice to American literature, describing the experience of narrator Esperanza Cordero, a Mexican American girl living a hardscrabble existence in Chicago. As Bebe Moore Campbell put it, in the New York Times Book Review: "She is not only a gifted writer, but an absolutely essential one."

The book bore the author's powerful descriptive talents: Comparing her house on Mango Street with the "real house" her parents had promised her, Esperanza notes, "The house on Mango street is not the way they told it at all. It's small and red with tight steps in front and windows so small you'd think they were holding their breath."

Cisneros, who grew up in Chicago as the only daughter in a family of seven children, attended college on scholarship and was an ethnic anomaly as a graduate student at University of Iowa's renowned Writers' Workshop. There is a lyric quality to Cisneros' work that makes sense, given her alternate life as a poet who has published several volumes of poetry (two, 1980's Bad Boys and 1985's The Rodrigo Poems, are no longer in print).

As a poet, Cisneros has a staccato, highly evocative style. From "A Few Items to Consider," for example: "First there is the scent of barley/to remember. Barley and rain./The smooth terrain to recollect and savor./Unforgiving whiteness of the room./Ambiguity of linen. Purity./Mute and still as photographs on the moon." Cisneros suffuses her poetry and fiction with healthy dose of Spanish and a feminine sensibility, female narrators who remember everything and for whom no detail or sensation is too small. Paragraphs are often punctuated by lists and five-word snapshots. As Cisneros herself has said, she is a miniaturist.

Her poetry and a 1991 collection of stories, Woman Hollering Creek, would have to tide fans over until the long-awaited release of her second novel, 2002's Caramelo. Like her first novel, the story is narrated by a Mexican-American girl; but the scope is a broader one, covering generations of a family as viewed through a cherished caramelo rebozo, or striped traditional shawl, which has been passed down through generations to the book's heroine.

Caramelo has a comical and occasionally unconventional spirit to it, as when one of the characters in the story breaks in to complain about how she is being portrayed. The novel began as an exploration of her own family, and the connection to Cisneros' own life is evident. Here as in other work, Cisneros fills in the gaps between Mexico and the U.S., personal myth and reality.

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    1. Hometown:
      San Antonio, Texas
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 20, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., Loyola University, 1976; M.F.A., University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, 1978

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Little Clown, My Heart 3
You Bring Out the Mexican in Me 4
Original Sin 7
Old Maids 9
I Let Him Take Me 11
Extreme Unction 12
A Few Items to Consider 14
I Am So in Love I Grow a New Hymen 16
Your Name Is Mine 18
Something Like Rivers Ran 19
You My Saltwater Pearl 21
You Like to Give and Watch Me My Pleasure 23
Christ You Delight Me 25
En Route to My Lover I Am Detained by Too Many Cities and Human Frailty 26
Dulzura 27
You Called Me Corazon 28
Love Poem for a Non-Believer 29
The Heart Rounds Up the Usual Suspects 33
Waiting for a Lover 34
Well, If You Insist 36
Pumpkin Eater 37
I Am So Depressed I Feel Like Jumping in the River Behind My House but Won't Because I'm Thirty-Eight and Not Eighteen 39
Bay Poem from Berkeley 40
After Everything 41
I Want to Be a Father Like the Men 43
El Alacran Guero 45
Thing in My Shoe 47
Night Madness Poem 49
I Don't Like Being in Love 51
Amorcito Corazon 52
A Little Grief Like Gouache 53
Full Moon and You're Not Here 54
My Friend Turns Beautiful Before My Eyes 56
Perras 58
Unos Cuantos Piquetitos 59
With Lorenzo at the Center of the Universe, el Zocalo, Mexico City 60
I Awake in the Middle of the Night and Wonder If You've Been Taken 64
Small Madness 65
Heart, My Lovely Hobo 69
I Am on My Way to Oklahoma to Bury the Man I Nearly Left My Husband For 70
Cloud 72
Tu Que Sabes de Amor 73
Once Again I Prove the Theory of Relativity 74
Fan of a Floating Woman 76
That Beautiful Boy Who Lives Across from the Handy Andy 77
Black Lace Bra Kind of Woman 78
Down There 79
Los Desnudos: A Triptych 86
Mexicans in France 91
My Nemesis Arrives After a Long Hiatus 93
A Man in My Bed Like Cracker Crumbs 96
Bienvenido Poem for Sophie 97
Arturito the Amazing Baby Olmec Who Is Mine by Way of Water 98
Jumping off Roofs 100
Why I Didn't 102
Las Girlfriends 105
Champagne Poem for La Josie 107
Still Life with Potatoes, Pearls, Raw Meat, Rhinestones, Lard, and Horse Hooves 108
Vino Tinto 111
Loose Woman 112
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    Private thoughts in full view.

    I relished this book of poems. The lines are palpable. I got the sense of the Mexican influence for sure. I could taste the words and feel the loves won and lost. I love the grit and the beauty in her words and the feelings they invoke. Fabulous!

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  • Posted April 11, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Cisneros Sizzles

    Sanda Cisneros has hit this one out of the park. No one is as adept at making you cry, junp for joy, or scream out in anger. Her lyrical voice begs for attention. Although her Latina heritage peeps through from time to time, this collection is a must for every woman everywhere. So brush up on your Spanish so you dont miss the nuances and hold on tight. This
    is one ride you should take.
    All the more exciting because im a man.

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    Posted December 30, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted March 26, 2014

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    Posted August 5, 2013

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