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Lorca, Bunuel, Dali: Forbidden Pleasures and Connected Lives
     

Lorca, Bunuel, Dali: Forbidden Pleasures and Connected Lives

by Gwynne Edwards
 

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Lorca, Buñuel and Dalí were, in their respective fields of poetry and theatre, cinema, and painting, three of the most imaginative creative artists of the twentieth century; their impact was felt far beyond the boundaries of their native Spain. But if individually they have been examined by many, their connected lives have rarely been considered. It is

Overview

Lorca, Buñuel and Dalí were, in their respective fields of poetry and theatre, cinema, and painting, three of the most imaginative creative artists of the twentieth century; their impact was felt far beyond the boundaries of their native Spain. But if individually they have been examined by many, their connected lives have rarely been considered. It is these, the ties that bind them, that constitute the subject of this illuminating book.

They were born within six years of each other and, as Gwynne Edwards reveals, their childhood circumstances were very similar, each being affected by a narrow-minded society and an intolerant religious background, which equated sex with sin. All three experienced sexual problems of different kinds: Lorca, homosexual anguish, Buñuel sexual inhibition, and Dalí virtual impotence. They met during the 1920s at the Residencia de Estudiantes in Madrid, which cannelled their respective obsessions into the cultural forms then prevalent in Europe, in particular Surrealism. Rooted in such turmoil, their work — from Lorca’s dramatic characters seeking sexual fulfilment, to Buñuel’s frustrated men and women, and Dalí's potent images of shame and guilt — is highly autobiographical. Their left-wing outrage directed at bourgeois values and the Catholic Church was sharpened by the political upheavals of the 1930s, which in Spain led to the catastrophic Civil War of 1936-39. Lorca was murdered by Franco’s fascists in 1936. This tragic event hastened Buñuel's departure to Mexico and Dalí's to New York and Edwards relates how for the rest of his life Buñuel clung to his left-wing ideals and made outstanding films, while the increasingly eccentric and money-grubbing Dalí embraced Fascism and the Catholic Church and his art went into steep decline.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"One can find numerous studies on each [artist] individually, but few scholars, if any, have dealt with the impact of their interconnected personal and creative lives. Edwards meets this challenge superbly. Thanks to his careful research, he clarifies many longstanding misconceptions and elucidates the sociopolitical circumstances in Spain that determined crucial personal decisions by each of these artists. An engrossing, noteworthy book." —CHOICE
 

"The first substantial treatment in English of the relationship between these three major artists against the backdrop of social and political change and upheaval" — Federico Bonaddio,  Bulletin of Hispanic Studies

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848850071
Publisher:
I. B.Tauris & Company, Limited
Publication date:
07/15/2009
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Gwynne Edwards has written extensively on key figures in Spanish cultural history, ranging from Lorca to Almodovar. His translations of Lorca’s plays, as well as those of seventeenth-century and modern South American dramatists, have been published by Methuen, and many have been staged professionally. Until recently, he was Professor of Spanish at the University of Wales, where he specialized in theatre and film.

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