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Lord Althorp
     

Lord Althorp

by Ernest Myers
 
Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally

Overview

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940025779629
Publisher:
R. Bentley
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
305 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. MARRIAGE AND BEREAVEMENT—LEADERSHIP OF THE LIBERAL OPPOSITION. IT is refreshing to know that these years of Parliamentary effacement, or at least insignificance, were filled with interest and delight in Althorp's private life. The stagnation in politics gave him leisure for occupations which he immeasurably preferred—occupations of the country and of home. He was fond of many manly exercises. When he was in town he kept himself in health and spirits by some of such as were available there. To the unsurpassed exercise of boxing he was ardently devoted, and attained great proficiency in it. We do not hear of his fencing. He kept up rackets, which he had learned at Harrow, but there seems to be no evidence that he proceeded to the more elaborate and nobler game of tennis. His chief passion, however, was for field-sports, and especially hunting. His seat was not very good,and he had frequent falls, sometimes dislocating his shoulder ; nor was he ever a first-rate shot, though he greatly enjoyed shooting, and even kept a record of the game he killed or missed. But his greatest pleasure, he once said, was "to see sporting dogs hunt." He had become, like his father and grandfather, master of the Pytchley hounds, and that famous hunt was never more famous than under his charge. He justified what might have seemed an extravagant absorption in an amusement, by turning it to the best account as a means to draw closer all the ties of good- fellowship uniting various classes of the neighbourhood. Many years afterwards he would say that no other experience had taught him more of human nature. In later life he gave up hunting, and concentrated his energies, when he was inthe country, on the improvement of agriculture and stock-breeding. For some years, however, about this tim...

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