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The Lord of the Isles
     

The Lord of the Isles

4.6 10
by Sir Walter Scott
 

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The Lord of the Isles is a rhymed, romantic, narrative-poem by Sir Walter Scott, written in 1815.
The story begins during the time when Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick has been hunted out of Scotland into exile by the English and their allies. Bruce returns over sea from the Island of Rachrin: but is forced to land close to hostile forces at Artonish Castle on

Overview

The Lord of the Isles is a rhymed, romantic, narrative-poem by Sir Walter Scott, written in 1815.
The story begins during the time when Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick has been hunted out of Scotland into exile by the English and their allies. Bruce returns over sea from the Island of Rachrin: but is forced to land close to hostile forces at Artonish Castle on the seacoast of Argylshire. Seeking refuge from tempestuous seas, Bruce begs shelter from Ronald, Lord of the Isles: inadvertently on the day of his marriage feast to the beautiful Edith of Lorn.
Bruce's very presence is enough to interrupt the nuptials and to break up the festivities: the guests quickly polarise into two armed and equally matched factions: one ready to raise Bruce to the Scottish crown, the other ready to slay him for desecration and murder. The combatants are dispersed with no bloodshed only by the combined offices of Lord Ronald himself, aided by a visiting Abbot: whereupon Bruce quickly removes himself to first the Island of Skye, and then Ayrshire: raising the an army willing to rout the English and re-establish fight for Scottish independence.
Bruce begins to win a steady stream of victories as his armies march inevitably towards Bannockburn. There, Bruce confronts Scotland's formidable enemy - led by the son of the Hammer of the Scots: the English outnumbering the Scots by more than two to one.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781522779445
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/16/2015
Pages:
162
Sales rank:
764,585
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.35(d)

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Lord of the Isles 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1370 Scotland, Hector ¿The Ferocious¿ Maclean races home with information to share with his brother when the storm gets so bad he needs shelter. He chooses Castle Charlamine, home of widower Murdoch Macleod of Glenelg. Hector arrives in time to rescue the beautiful seventeen years old Mariota from receiving a terrible burn. Besotted with the teen, he asks her father Murdoch for her hand in marriage; Murdoch says no as he believes that if any of his eight daughters wed out of chronological birth order, his clan will be cursed. Instead he offers his oldest child Cristina. Hector insists on Mariota and finally Murdoch apparently acquiesces. --- At the wedding reception, Murdoch gets everyone drunk and substitutes Cristina as the bride. When Hector awakens in the morning and realizes who he married, he lives up to his nickname roaring annulment. Cristina stays calm and persuades him for their individual reputations they need to leave together. Not long afterward, he flirts outrageously with Mariota, but becomes irately jealous when he thinks his wife is seeing someone else because he loves Cristina who loved Hector even before she became his substitute bride. --- Hector seems to have calmed down as if he is on Ritalin compared to the prequel (see HIGHLAND PRINCESS); still he remains a viable force that one does not mess with if they want to remain healthy. With that calling card, the duplicity of the superstitious Murdoch and Cristina¿s courage to face him make for a fine fourteenth century romance. Though Mariota is spoiled to the degree of a caricature and deserves her fate, fans will appreciate this tale of marriage starring the wrong bride.--- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not one of my favorites. Not really much action. A bit on the boring side. To much talking.......
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the part where Hector rescued Mariota after her skirt caught fire.
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LUVSCOTS More than 1 year ago
love this book. My first Amanda Scott. I need to read the pre-quell to this. But this was a very good stand alone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Two Scots were heroic contemporaries around the year 1300. William Wallace was recently portrayed by Mel Gibson in the film BRAVEHEART. Many of us remember from school days the discouraged King Robert the Bruce. He took heart watching a spider try and fail six times till it wove the next strand in its web. This generated the schoolboy maxim, 'If at first you don't succeed, try, try again.' *** Sir Walter Scott linked these two heroes in his narrative poem, THE LORD OF THE ISLES. Scott excerpted and compressed events from 'THE BRUCE,' by the 14th century Scottish historian Archdeacon of Aberdeen, John Barbour. Scott also demonstrated here as elsewhere that history is far more than the swift movement by impersonal vessels toward gigantic destinations. The ships of national history are also weighted down by barnacles: the lives, loves, hatreds and jealousies of lesser beings who move willy-nilly about in the great events. *** THE LORD OF THE ISLES covers seven crucial years in the life of Robert the Bruce. Crowned King of Scotland in 1306, he was driven to Ireland by the English led by the imperialistic King Edward I. But in the spring of 1307 Bruce sailed with his sister Isabel and brother Edward back to his native Ayrshire on the rugged western coast of Scotland. He won growing support from the clans and seven years later, June 24, 1314 destroyed a vast English army at Bannockburn near Stirling. *** The subplots of the story involve the initially thwarted marriage between Ronald (real name Angus Og), the Lord of the Isles, and Edith, the Maid of Lorn housed with her Bruce-hating kinsman in the mainland castle of Atornish. Ronald would really like to marry Bruce's sister Isabel. But she becomes a nun and persuades Edith to take Ronald back. This becomes easier to do after The Lord of the Isles distinguishes himself at the battle of Bannockburn. *** Someone reading Sir Walter Scott for the first time might find too much Scottish history, explained in too many notes. But reading this long poem is altogether other for someone enamored of all things Scottish, including intricate genealogies of bygone clan leaders. That said, for any reader the story moves briskly, abounds in cameos of mighty figures of medieval Scotland and England, is lyrical in descriptions of the landscapes of some of the 200 islands (Skye, Mull, etc.) of the West of Scotland and tells a love story of a maid disguised as a mute minstrel (making us recall a similar character in another long poem by Scott, HAROLD THE DAUNTLESS). ***