Lord of the World [NOOK Book]

Overview

Many people are not aware of a startling recommendation that was made by our current Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI. He was sharply critical of the call for a "New World Order" made by President George H. W. Bush.

While giving a speech at the Catholic University of Milan on February 8, 1992, during which time he was head of the Congregation for the Doctine of the Faith, ...
See more details below
Lord of the World

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.95
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Many people are not aware of a startling recommendation that was made by our current Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI. He was sharply critical of the call for a "New World Order" made by President George H. W. Bush.

While giving a speech at the Catholic University of Milan on February 8, 1992, during which time he was head of the Congregation for the Doctine of the Faith, Cardinal Ratzinger recommended that we read a book entitled "The Lord of the World" written in 1907 by Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson .

The Holy Father cautioned us saying the world that President Bush had called for would implement:

"... a similar unified civilization and its power to destroy the spirit. The anti-Christ is represented as the great carrier of peace in a similar new world order."

Given his position in the Church it is not only astonishing, it is utterly incredible that Cardinal Ratzinger would say this and then point to Msgr. Benson's book . He knew well the sensational nature of the "The Lord of the World" and the danger posed by the New World Order called for by President Bush. It is impossible that the Holy Father was not warning us that we could actually be facing the times and the danger that Msgr. Benson had written about.

And we also have a startling comment made by Pope John Paul II when in 1976, as Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, he said,

"We are now standing in the face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through. I do not think that wide circles of the American society or wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully. We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the anti-Church, of the Gospel and the anti-Gospel. This confrontation lies within the plans of divine providence. It is a trial which the whole Church . . . must take up."

There have always been confrontations between the Church and Her Gospel, but notice Cardinal Wojtyla did not say "another confrontation". He said " the final confrontation".

And in fact, Msgr. Benson's book is considered by many to be a prophetic novel in that he spoke of things not known in his day. Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen described this book as one of the three greatest depictions of the advent of the demonic in World Literature.

It is also worth considering a reflection by Dennis L. Cuddy, Ph.D. who commented on the characters and events in Msgr. Benson's book and then the events that have transpired over the last 100 years. In April, 2005 he noted:

"Not only was Benson prescient in terms of writing about "the Volor" (a fast silent aircraft that could hover), but he also wrote: "In 1917...Communism really began....The new order began then....(After 1989) the final scheme of Western Free Trade.... Esotericism is making enormous strides---and that means Pantheism....Humanitarianism is becoming an actual religion itself. It is Pantheism....Patriotism has been dying fast....(There is) this European parliament....(They believe) cooperation is the one hope of the world....(There will be) the alliance of Psychology and Materialism....With the Release Act in 1998...(there were) the ministers of euthanasia....Julian Felsenburgh (Lord of the World) had a magnetic character...rising out of the heaving dun-coloured waters of American Socialism like a vision....Felsenburgh's running the whole thing now....It will mean free trade all over the world....(His) speech consisted of a brief announcement of the great fact of Universal Brotherhood....The new era has begun....Party must unite with party, country with country, and continent with continent....Felsenburgh was called the Son of Man...the Savior of the World....Persecution was coming....It involved all the stupendous force of Socialism directed by a brilliant individual....America was powerless: the balance of power was overwhelmingly against her....This appearance of peace has deceived many....The press was engineered with extraordinary adroitness....The world is one now, not many. Individualism is dead. It died when Felsenburgh became President of the World....For any one to say that they believe in God---it is high treason....The Humanity Religion was the only one. Man was God....No actual point of light breaking the appalling vault of gloom."

Cuddy goes on to say:

"Note how in 1907 Benson correctly described the Communist movement coming to the fore in 1917, the final scheme of Western Free Trade in 1989, and ministers of euthanasia (e.g., Dr. Jack Kevorkian) in 1998. Note also that Benson referred to "the stupendous force of Socialism," and that is why Cardinal Ratzinger's choice of the name Benedict XVI is of interest. The last Pope by that name, Benedict XV, on July 25, 1920 delivered an encyclical BONUM SANE, in which he warned: "The coming of a world state is longed for, by all the worst and most distorted elements. This state, based on the principles of absolute equality of men and
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012061065
  • Publisher: Roger LeBlanc
  • Publication date: 12/20/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 325
  • File size: 223 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2002

    Execellent End of the World Book

    Very interesting novel on an end of the world scenario. Written before modern inventions like planes were practicle, the similarities with some of the modern themes of humanism, euthanasia, and a loss of Christian faith makes this a stark look at reality and the fight against evil. Benson was an outstanding convert from England's Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism. His books are considered classics.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2001

    I could scarcely put it down!

    Well it came in the mail in the morning after I'd been waiting to get it for over a year (it's been out of print after all!). I was annoyed because I had to work, but when work was finished I dove into it. It was a little different from what I'd expected, but different in some really good ways. This is not just an apocalyptic novel for excitement's sake. Benson has done a superb job of portraying the conflicts that arise in human hearts as well as the possible outcomes of some societal trends. He forsees the ready acceptance of euthanasia, even for what we would now see as depression. Even a form of the EU appears in the book. True he sees Communism as still a force, where today we would probably debate that, but his 'Communism' does not look like Leninist Communism (nor should it since he was writing before the Russian Revolution), it looks more like Socialism. What we would call airplanes are called volars, but the descriptions of flight are amazing for one writing before commercial air travel became possible. His style seemed reminiscent of Charles Williams, his setting reminiscent of Brave New World. Since both of these authors wrote after Benson and both were British I wonder if they were familiar with him. I was particularly gripped by the descriptions of Father Percy Franklin's spiritual struggles. The character's constancy in the midst of turmoil was heroic, but it also gave some real modeling for the reader about how to proceed when the world as you've known it is crumbling around you. Benson lets the reader see the scenario of the end times from several perspectives, not just from the perspective of the faithful Christian, but from the perspective of the convinced humanist as well. We see fidelity and betrayal, hope and despair, faith in God and faith in Man. This is a very Catholic novel, but I don't think that you necessarily have to be Catholic to enjoy it. But be forwarned the hero of the piece is a very faithful Catholic and the villains are very faithful believers in Man. I've read it once, recommended it to my daughter, and I'm sure that I'll read it again many times.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 12, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    super good :)

    super good :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2012

    Great Book!

    This is a must read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)