Lost and Found

Lost and Found

by Eliza Gilkyson
     
 
Right from its jaunty, country-folk-twanged opener, the dented-but-dustin’-myself-off "Welcome Back," it’s clear that Lost and Found, Gilkyson’s seventh album, is the work of a woman stronger and wiser in the ways of life, love, and music. Vocalizing straight from the heart in an intimate soprano that is by turns breathy, husky, and clear, the

Overview

Right from its jaunty, country-folk-twanged opener, the dented-but-dustin’-myself-off "Welcome Back," it’s clear that Lost and Found, Gilkyson’s seventh album, is the work of a woman stronger and wiser in the ways of life, love, and music. Vocalizing straight from the heart in an intimate soprano that is by turns breathy, husky, and clear, the Austin singer-songwriter easily lays out each song like a trump card from a sing-along deck loaded with poetry, melody, and hooky choruses. And each song dealt unveils the spirit and the flesh entwined, a full house of man's mysteries and faith's showdowns. The sweaty-swamp-slide blues of "Mama’s Got a Boyfriend" features a "kitchen man banging on her pots and pans," while the lay-laddie-lay plaint of "Fall into the Night" evokes a place where "my longing meets your longing like true companions." The wistful country waltz of "Heart of a Man," with Patty Griffin’s angelic harmony, plays off the stately "Easy Rider," an homage to her late father, songwriter Terry Gilkyson. "Angel & Delilah" explores a you-me-and-your-death wish love triangle, and there is a relentless roll of spiritual crisis in "He’ll Miss This Train," by Gilkyson’s brother, former X-band member Tony. Gilkyson stares hard at "Aphrodite’s Face," seeing love in its earthly and mystical guises, and lands solidly on the other shore with "Riverside," a simple we-loved-some-we-lost-some piano hymn. In the high-stakes game of life, Lost and Foundis a hands-down winner, a work of amazing grace. --Janie Matthews

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Zac Johnson
Folk audiences were overjoyed when Texan singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams gained well-deserved national attention with her albums Car Wheels on a Gravel Road and Essence. If there is any justice in the music industry, Eliza Gilkyson's 2002 Red House Records release, Lost and Found, will give her the same exposure. Both women have paid their dues not only as performers, but also as daughters, lovers, and human beings, and these elements are reflected in the honesty of their songs. Gilkyson's beautifully rough voice seeps emotion on the sensual love song "Fall into the Night" and effectively recounts hard livin' on the road song "Easy Rider." She is joined on the album by Patty Griffin, Slaid Cleaves, and her brother Tony Gilkyson (formerly of the band X), who each add subtle and unobtrusive textures to Gilkyson's darkly melodic poems. Co-producer Mark Hallman performed a great service by keeping the songs stripped down and a little bare, making each note important and every word stand alone.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/09/2002
Label:
Red House
UPC:
0033651016229
catalogNumber:
162
Rank:
317551

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Eliza Gilkyson   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Piano,Electric Guitar,national steel guitar
Slaid Cleaves   Background Vocals
Rich Brotherton   Acoustic Guitar,Mandolin,Background Vocals
Tony Gilkyson   Electric Guitar
Patty Griffin   Background Vocals
Mark Hallman   Background Vocals
Andrew Hardin   Electric Guitar
Lloyd Maines   Dobro,Lap Steel Guitar
Michael Ramos   Hammond Organ
David Webb   Hammond Organ,Melodion,Pump Organ
Glenn Fukunaga   Bass
Mike Hardwick   Dobro,Electric Guitar
Jeff D. Klein   Background Vocals
Jeff Plankenhorn   Dobro
Johnny Goudie   Background Vocals
Cisco Ryder   Drums,Cajon

Technical Credits

Eliza Gilkyson   Producer
Mark Hallman   Producer,Engineer
Carla Leighton   Art Direction
Ned Stewart   Engineer
Marl Hallman   Producer

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