Lost And Found

Lost And Found

5.0 1
by Hess
     
 

Elizabeth Hess, a journalist and former art critic, walked into the Columbia Greene Animal Shelter in upstate New York looking for a new dog. Touched by the animals' plight and the dedication of the workers, she began to volunteer at the shelter on a regular basis. In Lost and Found, Hess brings you behind the scenes in this thorough examination of the day-to-day

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Overview

Elizabeth Hess, a journalist and former art critic, walked into the Columbia Greene Animal Shelter in upstate New York looking for a new dog. Touched by the animals' plight and the dedication of the workers, she began to volunteer at the shelter on a regular basis. In Lost and Found, Hess brings you behind the scenes in this thorough examination of the day-to-day workings of the shelter. From the weekly adoption days, when families come to find a new dog or cat, to investigations of animal abuse and a thrilling puppy mill raid, we come to know both the animals and their caretakers on a deeply personal level. With a keen eye for detail and profound emotional insight, Hess dispels common myths about shelter animals and captures the boundless compassion and courage of the people who comfort and defend them, especially during their desperate efforts to find homes for the animals, lest they be put to sleep. A vivid portrait of a world many of us are blissfully unaware of, Lost and Found is "a must-read for every pet owner" (Seattle Times).

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Intelligent, warmhearted and deserving of attention."-the New York Times Book Review
"Both joyful and terribly sad . . . Hess manages to write with the skill of a journalist, but also with the soul of a passionate animal lover, making Lost and Found a delight to read."-Boston Herald
NY Times Book Review
Intelligent, warmhearted and deserving of attention.
Boston Herald
Both joyful and terribly sad...Hess manages to write with the skill of a journalist, but also with the soul of a passionate animal lover, making Lost and Found a delight to read.
KLIATT
This is a wonderful reading choice for all those YAs who are animal lovers. Told in the first person by a volunteer worker at an animal shelter in upstate New York, each tale of an eccentric owner or an interesting pet is sure to keep readers reading. Those stories are the appeal, of course, and they work wonderfully well; but Hess considers some ethical and practical issues concerning pets as well. For instance, how aggressively should shelters screen people who want to adopt a pet? What about the euthanization of unadoptable animals? Are shelters that refuse to "put animals down" morally superior? Because of the vivid descriptions (including their personal philosophies) of the people in charge of the shelter where Hess works, the reader learns to think clearly and frankly about people's relationship with their pets and our responsibilities as humane members of communities shared by people and animals. Hess is a freelance journalist who obviously is a professional as she goes to the task of describing the inner workings of an animal shelter. Loving animals herself, and coming to the shelter as a novice who then must work out her own philosophy of how best to care for domestic pets, she will connect immediately with any reader who shares her interest. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1998, Harcourt/Harvest, 224p, illus, index, 21cm, 97-51650, $13.00. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Claire Rosser; July 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 4)
Kirkus Reviews
A revelatory, smartly written account of the workings at an impressive animal shelter in New York State, from Village Voice art critic (and shelter volunteer) Hess. It is Hess's hope that this book "will turn the most common myths about shelter animals inside out": principally that the animals are losers, either sick or frantic or vicious. She accomplishes that task in the first few pages and the remainder of the book is given over to profiling the denizensþboth human and animalþof the Columbia-Greene Humane Society. The animals are a genial and motley crew of mostly dogs and cats, with a few rabbits and goats and others. The humans are a no-nonsense group of extraordinarily dedicated, underpaid men and women devoted to the welfare of animals. In the process, Hess dispels the notion of shelters as blood-mad abattoirs, stinking and neglected final ports of call for the dregs of the pet world (though Hess doesn't shrink from taking a long, hard look at the role of euthanasia in a shelter). A couple of the chapters provide adrenaline-pumping excitementþgoing on patrol with a humane-law enforcement agent, taking part of a raid at a grotesque puppy millþand there are stories aplenty of cruelty and its consequences: "Chances are, when a crazy dog arrives at the shelter, there's a crazy person on the other end of the leash." Perhaps most troubling to Hess is how far our throw-away culture has gone, how we can show so little compunction about handing a pet over to a shelter, absolve ourselves of responsibilities, and how that in turn is reflected in the modern tenuousness of human survival as well. As Hess makes all too clear, shelters aren't slaughterhouses butsanctuaries, witnessþprotection programs for animals that are more refugeesþfrom neglect or abuse or abandonmentþthan strays. (Author tour)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156012881
Publisher:
Harcourt
Publication date:
05/01/2000
Edition description:
1 HARVEST
Pages:
244
Product dimensions:
0.55(w) x 5.50(h) x 8.50(d)

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