The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family [NOOK Book]

Overview

Imagine a young boy who has never had a loving home. His only possesions are the old, torn clothes he carries in a paper bag. The only world he knows is one of isolation and fear. Although others had rescued this boy from his abusive alcoholic mother, his real hurt is just begining -- he has no place to call home.


This is Dave Pelzer's long-awaited sequel to A Child Called "It". In The Lost Boy, he answers questions and reveals new adventures ...

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The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family

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Overview

Imagine a young boy who has never had a loving home. His only possesions are the old, torn clothes he carries in a paper bag. The only world he knows is one of isolation and fear. Although others had rescued this boy from his abusive alcoholic mother, his real hurt is just begining -- he has no place to call home.


This is Dave Pelzer's long-awaited sequel to A Child Called "It". In The Lost Boy, he answers questions and reveals new adventures through the compelling story of his life as an adolescent. Now considered an F-Child (Foster Child), Dave is moved in and out of five different homes. He suffers shame and experiences resentment from those who feel that all foster kids are trouble and unworthy of being loved just because they are not part of a "real" family.


Tears, laughter, devastation and hope create the journey of this little lost boy who searches desperately for just one thing -- the love of a family.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Following A Child Called It Health Communications, 1995, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and appears frequently on high school reading lists, this is the second in a planned trilogy from motivational author and speaker Pelzer. Here he tells his story from the time he left his abusive mother and alcoholic father, through his experiences in five foster homes and juvenile detention, and how he eventually made it into the Air Force. He was a defiant, rebellious boy who, despite his background and personality, managed to endear himself to many guardians, social workers, and teachers. Pelzer writes in an honest, sometimes rambling, style; he is never bitter, and his story will find many sympathetic readers. However, he leaves many questions unanswered which may appear in the third book, dealing with his adult-life relationships, his son, the mother of that child, and the ways he turned his life around. This is sure to be popular among students and readers who await a sequel to A Child Called It. Well recommended. Linda Beck, Indian Valley P.L., Telford, Pa.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780757396069
  • Publisher: Health Communications, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 250
  • Sales rank: 21,379
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Dave Pelzer
A retired Air Force crewmember, Dave played a major role in Operations Just cause, Desert Shield and Desert Storm. He was selected for the unique task of midair refueling of the then highly secretive SR-71 Blackbird and F0117 Stealth Fighter. While serving in the Air Force, Dave worked in juvenile hall and other programs involving "youth at risk" throughout California.

Dave's exceptional accomplishments include personal commendations from former Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush. While maintaining a rigorous, active-duty flight schedule, Dave was the recipient of the 1990 J.C. Penney Golden Rule Award, making him the California Volunteer of the Year. In 1993 Dave was honored as one of the Ten Outstanding Young Americans (TOYA), joining a distinguished group of alumni that includes Chuck Yeager, Christopher Reeve, Anne Bancroft, John F. Kennedy, Orson Welles and Walt Disney. In 1994 Dave was the only American to be selected as one of The Outstanding Young Persons of the World (TOYP), for his efforts including child abuse awareness and prevention, as well as for instilling resilience in others. During the Centennial Olympic games, Dave was a torchbearer, carrying the coveted flame.

Dave is currently working on a book based on overcoming obstacles and achieving one's innermost best, as well as on the third part of his trilogy, entitled, A Man Named Dave.

When not on the road or with his son, Stephen, Dave lives a quiet life at the Russian River in Guerneville, California, with his box turtle named Chuck.

Biography

Dave Pelzer has experienced a truly extraordinary life. As a child, he endured the horrors of child abuse, which included physical torture, mental cruelty, and near starvation. Upon Dave's rescue, he was identified as one of the most severely abused children in California's history. At age 12, Dave's teachers risked their careers to notify the authorities and saved his life. Upon Dave's removal, he was made a ward of the court and placed in foster care until he enlisted in the U. S. Air Force at age 18. As a young adult Dave was determined to better himself—no matter what the odds.

As a member of the armed forces, Dave was handpicked to midair-refuel the highly secretive SR-71 Blackbird and the F-117 Stealth Fighter, which played a major role in Operations Just Cause, Desert Shield, and Desert Storm.

Some of Dave's distinctive accomplishments have been recognized through a number of awards, as well as personal commendations from Presidents Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In 1990, he was the recipient of the J. C. Penney Golden Rule Award, making him the California Volunteer of the Year. In 1993, Dave was honored as one of the Ten Outstanding Young Americans. He joins a distinguished group of alumni that include: John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Anne Bancroft, Orson Welles, Walt Disney, and Nelson Rockefeller. In 1994, Dave was the only American to be honored as one of The Outstanding Young Persons of the World. He also carried the coveted Centennial flame for the 1996 Olympics.

Dave's incredible life story was featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Montel Williams Show, Sally Jessy, Leeza Gibbons, and Barbara Walters's The View.

Dave is one of the few personalities who pay homage to educators, social services, foster care, law enforcement, and volunteers—those who make a difference in the lives of children. On the road over 250 days of the year, Dave offers programs for corporate groups, human services, and youth-at-risk. Dave's experience includes: Juvenile Hall Counselor, Youth Service Worker, Troy State University (human services studies), National Advisor, Missing Youth Foundation, Board of Directors, Foster Care ILP, and Certified Correctional Custody Program Facilitator.

Dave's unique and intriguing outlook on life, coupled with his Robin Williams-like wit and sense of humor, entertain and encourage men and women to overcome any obstacle while living life to its fullest. Dave is a living testament of resilience, faith in humanity, and personal responsibility. This is what makes him one of the most exceptional and unequaled entities of today. As an author, educator, and consultant, Dave has dedicated his life helping others…to help themselves.

Author biography courtesy of Dave Pelzer's official web site.

Good To Know

Pelzer is one of the only authors to have four books simultaneously on the New York Times bestseller list, and the first author to have three books simultaneously on this list in trade paperback.

He is the only author to date to have four No. 1 international bestsellers to his credit.

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    1. Also Known As:
      David J. Pelzer
    2. Hometown:
      Rancho Mirage, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      1961
    2. Place of Birth:
      Daly City, California
    1. Education:
      High School equivalency certificate
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter One


Winter 1970, Daly City, California—I'm alone. I'm hungry and I'm shivering in the dark! I sit on top of my hands at the bottom of the stairs in the garage. My head is tilted backward. My hands became numb hours ago. My neck and shoulder muscles begin to throb. But that's nothing new—l've learned to turn off the pain.


I'm Mother's prisoner.


I am nine years old and I've been living like this for years. Every day it's the same thing. I wake up from sleeping on an old army cot in the garage, perform the morning chores, and if I'm lucky, eat leftover breakfast cereal from my brothers. I run to school, steal food, return to "The House" and am forced to throw up in the toilet bowl to prove that I didn't commit the crime of stealing any food.


I receive beatings or play another one of her "games," perform afternoon chores, then sit at the bottom of the stairs until I'm summoned to complete the evening chores. Then, and only if I have completed all of my chores on time, and if I have not committed any "crimes," I may be fed a morsel of food.


My day ends only when Mother allows me to sleep on the army cot, where my body curls up in my meek effort to retain any body heat. The only pleasure in my life is when I sleep. That's the only time I can escape my life. I love to dream.


Weekends are worse. No school means no food and more time at "The House." All I can do is try to imagine myself away —somewhere, anywhere — from "The House." For years I have been the outcast of "The Family." As long as I can remember I have always been in trouble and have "deserved" to be punished. At first I thought I was a bad boy. Then I thought Mother was sick because she only acted differently when my brothers were not around and my father was away at work. But somehow I always knew Mother and I had a private relationship. I also realized that for some reason I have been Mother's sole target for her unexplained rage and twisted pleasure.


I have no home. I am a member of no one's family. I know deep inside that I do not now, nor will I ever deserve any love, attention or even recognition as a human being. I am a child called "It."


I'm all alone inside.


Upstairs the battle begins. Since it's after four in the afternoon, I knnow both of my parents are drunk. The yelling starts. First the name-calling, then the swearing. I count the seconds before the subject turns to me—it always does. The sound of Mother's voice makes my insides turn. "What do you mean?" she shrieks at my father, Stephen. "You think I treat æThe Boy' bad? Do you?" Her voice then turns ice cold. I can imagine her pointing a finger at my father's face. "You ... listen ... to ... me. You ... have no idea what æIt's' like. If you think I treat æIt' that bad ... then ... æIt' can live somewhere else.


I can picture my father—who, after all these years, still tries somewhat to stand up for me —swirling the liquor in his glass, making the ice from his drink rattle. "Now calm down," he begins. "All I'm trying to say is... wellà no child deserves to live like that. My God Roerva, you treat ... dogs better than ... than you do The Boy."


The argument builds to an ear-shattering climax. Mother slams her drink on the kitchen countertop.


Father has crossed the line. No one ever tells Mother what to do. I know I will have to pay the price for her rage. I realize it's only a matter of time before she orders me upstairs. I prepare myself. Ever so slowly I slide my hands out from under my butt, but not toofar—for I know sometimes she'll check on me. I know I am never to move a muscle without her permission.


I feel so small inside. I only wish I could somehow ...


Without warning, Mother opens the door leading to the downstairs garage. "You!" she screams. "Get your ass up here! Now!"


In a flash I bolt up the stairs. I wait a moment for her command before I timidly open the door. Without a sound I approach Mother and await one of her "games."


It's the game of address, in which I have to stand exactly three feet in front of her, my hands glued to my side, my head tilted down at a 45 degree angle and my eyes locked onto her feet. Upon the first command I must look above her bust, but below her eyes. Upon the second command I must look into her eyes, but never, never may I speak: breathe or move a single muscle unless Mother gives me permission to do so. Mother and I have been playing this game since I was seven years old, so today it's just another routine in my lifeless existence.


Suddenly Mother reaches over and seizes my right ear. By accident, I flinch. With her free hand Mother punishes my movement with a solid slap to my face. Her hand becomes a blur, right up until the moment before it strikes my face. I cannot see very well without my glasses. Since it is not a school day, I am not allowed to wear them. The blow from her hand burns my skin. "Who told you to move?" Mother sneers. I keep my eyes open, fixing them on a spot on the carpet. Mother checks for my reaction before again yanking my ear as she leads me to the front door.


"Turn around!" she yells. "Look at me!" But I cheat. From the corner of my eye I steal a glance at Father. He gulps down another swallow from his drink. His once rigid shoulders are now slumped over. His job as a fireman in San Francisco, his years of drinking and the strained relationship with Mother have taken their toll on him. Once my superhero and known for his courageous efforts in rescuing children from burning buildings, Father is now a beaten man. He takes another swallow before Mother begins. "Your father here thinks I treat you bad. Well, do I? DO I?"


My lips tremble. For a second I'm unsure whether I am supposed to answer Mother must know this and probably enjoys "the game" all the more. Either way, I'm doomed. I feel like an insect about to be squashed. My dry mouth opens. I can feel a film of paste separate from my lips. I begin to stutter.


Before I can form a word, Mother again yanks on my right ear. My ear feels as if it were on fire. "Shut that mouth of yours! No one told you to talk! Did they? Well, did they?" Mother bellows.


My eyes seek out Father. Seconds later he must have felt my need. "Roerva," he says, "that's no way to treat The Boy."


Again I tense my body and again Mother yanks on my ear, but this time she maintains the pressure, forcing me to stand on my toes. Mother's face turns dark red. "So you think I treat him badly? I . . ." Pointing her index finger at her chest, Mother continues. "I don't need this. Stephen, if you think I'm treating It badly ... well, It can just get out of my house!"


I strain my legs, trying to stand a little taller; and begin to tighten my upper body so that when Mother strikes I can be ready. Suddenly she lets go of my ear and opens the front door. "Get out!" she screeches. "Get out of my house! I don't like you! I don't want you! I never loved you! Get the hell out of my house!"


I freeze. I'm not sure of this game. My brain begins to spin with all the options of what Mother's real intentions may be. To survive, I have to think ahead. Father steps in front of me. "No!" he cries out. "That's enough. Stop it, Roerva. Stop the whole thing. Just let The Boy be."


Mother now steps between Father and me. "No?"


Mother begins in a sarcastic voice. "How many times have you told me that about The Boy? The Boy this, The Boy that. The Boy, The Boy, The Boy. How many times, Stephen?" She reaches out, touching Father's arm as if pleading with him; as if their lives would be so much better if I no longer lived with them—if I no longer existed.


Inside my head my brain screams, Oh my God! Now I know!


Without thinking Father cuts her off "No," he states in a low voice. "This," he says, spreading his hands, "this is wrong." I can tell by his trailing voice that Father has lost his steam. He appears to be on the verge of tears. He looks at me and shakes his head before looking at Mother. "Where will he live? Who's going to take care of ... ?"


"Stephen, don't you get it? Don't you understand? I don æt give a damn what happens to him. I don æt give a damn about The Boy.


Suddenly, the front door flies open. Mother smiles as she holds the doorknob. "Okay. All right. I'll leave it up to The Boy." She bends down, just inches in front of my face. Mother's breath reeks of booze. Her eyes are ice cold and full of pure hatred. I wish I could turn away. I wish I were back in the garage. In a slow, raspy voice, Mother says, "lf you think I treat you so badly, you can leave."


I snap out of my protective mold and takke a chance by looking at Father. He misses my glance as he sips another drink. My mind begins to tumble. I don't understand the purpose of her new game. Suddenly I realize that this is no game. It takes a few seconds for me to understand that this is my chance—my chance to escape. I've wanted to run away for years, but some invisible fear kept me from doing it. But I tell myself that this is too easy. I so badly want to move my legs, but they remain rigid.


"Well?" Mother screams into my ear "it's your choice." Time seems to stand still. As I stare down at the carpet, I can hear Mother begin to hiss. "He won't leave. The Boy will never leave. It hasnæt the guts to go.


I can feel the inside of my body begin to shake. For a moment I close my eyes, wishing myself away. In my mind I can see myself walking through the door. I smile inside. I so badly want to leave. The more I envision myself walking through the door, the more I begin to feel a warmth spread through my soul. Suddenly, I can feel my body moving. My eyes pop open. I look down at my worn-out sneakers. My feet are stepping through the front door. Oh my God, I say to myself, I can't believe I'm doing this! Out of fear, I dare not stop.


"There," Mother triumphantly states. "The Boy did it. It's his decision. I didn't force him. Remember that, Stephen. I want you to know I didn't force him.


I step through the front door, knowing full well that Mother will reach out and yank me back in. I can feel the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. I quicken my pace. After stepping past the door, I turn right and walk down the red steps. From behind me I can hear the sounds of Mother and Father straining themselves as they lean outside. "Roerva," Father says in a low voice "this is wrong."


"No!" she replies in a flat voice. "And remember, it was his decision. Besides, he'll be back."



¬1998. All rights reserved. Reprinted from The Lost Boy by David Pelzer. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher: Health Communications, Inc., 3201 SW 15th Street, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 783 )
Rating Distribution

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(584)

4 Star

(123)

3 Star

(49)

2 Star

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(19)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 787 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2012

    Confused

    Well the book was amazing and im only 12 but the first book talked about how he finally escaped.......but this one starts with how he was stuck with his mom again. The book made me hate his mom even more. Make sure you read the first " child called it " it is a outstanding book. I highly recomend this series!

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    H

    I dont want a five page book report. I want to know what u thought of the book,ok. So stop with the book reports

    11 out of 32 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2011

    Touching

    This book is truely amazing. A true story thatll make it impossible to put it down

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    My Book Review

    The book I am reviewing is The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer. Pelzer wrote six books about his life including A Child Called It. The Lost Boy is incredible true story of Dave Pelzer. I believe Dave Pelzer's purpose in writing this book was to get the attention of younger teenagers and adults because of the actions that took place in his lifetime. Pelzer almost died several times by the hands of his very own mentally disturbed alcoholic mother. He wanted others to somewhat know how it feels to go through what he did. It wasn't an easy thing for Pelzer to go through and he doesn't want to see or hear of any child go through what he did. Dave's intended audiences of this book are first of all one's that see the book as an interesting piece of material to read and all ages. He chose this audience group because he wants to help others and try to prevent what happened to him, happen to them. In 1994 he was the only American who received the Outstanding Young Person of the World award. He travels throughout the nation promoting inspiration and resilience.
    Dave Pelzer himself is writing the story. He is telling it all from his perspective as a child and into his early teenage years. I think it's very important that Dave Pelzer tells his story because of the way he was treated as a child compared to his other siblings in the household. Almost dying several times because of his mother can touch so many lives. I look at it as there's a lot of people that don't know how lucky they are until they read Dave's story. He touches so many people in the right ways. Dave Pelzer made quite the success in the telling of his story. He touched my heart and made me realize just how lucky not only I am but others that surround me. This book along with all his other books about his incredible life made New York Times Best Sellers List. There were and still is a lot of people that read his books along with The Lost Boy. I think Dave would say that his goals with this book were reached.
    The significance about the books title is that it's about Dave Pelzer's life as a young boy. He was lost and lonely in his torturing young life. It was made to touch people's hearts and to see how difficult it actually is for a child growing up that way. Life wasn't easy for Dave but he miraculously made it through and lives to tell about it today. I'd recommend this book to anyone of all ages that want to read it. I'd actually recommend that everyone in the nation reads it at some point in their lives because it's that good of a book. I couldn't put it down and I'm pretty sure that I'm not the only one out in the nation that felt the same way I did. I'd mostly recommend this book being read by teenagers and young adults. I found this book very interesting and full of detail. I thought it was pretty horrific that someone so young good go through this from his own mother but then be able to write about it later in life. I didn't think at all that it was confusing; I followed where we went the whole way in the text. I felt so much sorrow after reading this book and looking at his pictures online of his younger days. I enjoyed reading this book even though it was actually quite sad especially knowing that it was a true story written by Dave Pelzer himself. I agree that no child should have to go through what he did one bit. It's totally wrong for a child to go through something like that by his/her own parent. I felt the ending was a really good ending. It left off right where it should'v

    8 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Like the first book, this one is also a very emotional experienc

    Like the first book, this one is also a very emotional experience for the reader. I experienced feelings of anger, sadness, and frustration. The first chapter reveals how the first book ended with the boy being rescued from his abusive mother. The proceeding chapters go in depth of the child's life in foster care and institutions, always in search of a loving family to care for him. Whats frustrating about this particular book, and like the first, is that it never reveals any consequences the abusive mother recieved. In fact, in this sequel, she still tries to get to him and continues to manipulate the system. What's appalling is she is allowed to do this with little or no consequences. I feel this book should be read by everyone in order to make anyone who can make a difference in our society aware of this issue. I anxiously await the third book in the series, for I wonder how the final healing has taken place for Mr. Pelzer. What has happened to his parents; did he ever learn why his mother behaved as she did? How has he learned to parent his own child in the absence of a proper example in his childhood? I could not put your book down after I bought it at the airport. My heart broke for your loss and your continued struggle to understand why your mother did those horrific things to you and your family. One could quickly blame the alchohol, but my heart ached as you continually tried to uncover what it was you could have done to make things turn out differently. Sometimes, we do not find the answers in this lifetime---your courage and honesty are appreciated. I highly recommend this book to any parent or anyone who is curious about "the system." My hat is off to you, Mr. Pelzer.    

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2009

    THE LOST BOY BY DAVE PELZER As a child the author Dave Pelzer was brutally beaten and started by his crazy mother.

    As a child the author Dave Pelzer was brutally beaten and started by his crazy mother.<BR/>Nobody know what Dave was going through. The conflict of the story is how Dave was treated by his mother and how he struggled to find a special family. He wanted a family who is caring, loving, and calling him their son. Dave always wanted his abusive mother to tell him what went wrong, why she treated him like that. He wanted to make things better between them. One day Dave's school found out how his mother treated him and told the police. From there his journey away from his abusive mother starts. This story was really touching.I liked how the school and his foster parents helped him throughout his life. Dave faced a lots of problems in his life as a young boy. How his mother treated him was wrong and rude, but deep down Dave always considered her to be his real mother. His foster parents helped him find a better family for Dave and they kept his mother from trying to get to him. Dave moved from place to place to find a family. He always wanted to fit in with boys at school , which made him do somethings in life that he will regret. Dave was blamed for starting a fire at school, which he never did. He then was sent to Juvenile hall. He told the judge that he didn't do anything.Dave thought why did the boy who started the fire blamed it on him. He found out that the boy told on dave because he didnt want to get in trouble. Dave then was sent to Juvenile hall for just fews day. After he came back he was on his way to find a new family but will he?

    7 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2012

    Cvv

    U all dont get it. This book is after he is abused u have to read a child caoled it first duhhhh.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2012

    Kimbey

    Hey this book is so sad it made me cry

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 14, 2012

    Imagine your mother or father abusing you. Well, I read a book


    Imagine your mother or father abusing you. Well, I read a book called The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer. It&rsquo;s about him being abused by his &ldquo;Mother&rdquo;. Dave was about 6 when his &ldquo;Mother&rdquo; started to abuse him. I really recommend this book to all people who think their life is terrible. If you weren&rsquo;t abused your life is fine.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 1, 2010

    Are you ready to see reality?

    My name Is Holly and I am a junior at Holt High School and I have just finish reading The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer. This book is an autobiography and is a follow up to Dave Pelzer's book A Child Called "It". I must say that this is one of my favorite books that I have ever read. I truly enjoyed every page and looked forward to what was going to happen next. Throughout the novel the story will make you mad, make you cry, and at the end relieved; you will be crying tears of joy.
    The book takes you through young Dave's experiences through the foster care system after being taken.rescued really, from his alcoholic mother. You see him struggling for a place to call "home" and describes his life when he jumps from one foster home to another for six years.
    The novel begins were The Child Called "It" had stopped, which is with his mother and her physically and emotionally abusing him. At the age of twelve, he had overcome a trial that questioned him to be free from his mother and then begins his long journey. Dave describes how he is haunted by the fear of being returned to his insane mother, and recovering from the brainwash that his mother had fed him for years, (that's about the only thing she had fed him). His constant search to find love of a family and a "home", the desperate attempts for expectance among his peers, lead Dave through a series of foster families and also a juvenile detention center.
    I think that any one that wants to have a career dealing with child abuse or related fields should read this novel. This is a very emotional, in-depth novel. It opens your eyes to the child's point of view. child abuse is still relevant in today's society, and sadly some parents, who are supposed to be protecting their child, instead are the ones that are the most dangerous people in the child's life; as seen in The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2014

    The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer is a memoir about him as a child wh

    The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer is a memoir about him as a child who is abused and is transferred to a foster home. One characteristics that I enjoyed about the main character, Dave, is that he hardcore. When I say that he is hard core I mean that he is a man living the thug/crime life. He always steals from a store that is up the street from his school. Another characteristic that I enjoyed about Dave is that he is an abused child who is coming from an environment that is not very good. His mom abuses him, she is also an alcoholic, she swears at Dave, and she does not feed him. Then he is moved to a foster home where you can tell that he has a lot of manners, which surprised me. 
    Something that I had disliked about it was this kid that is in Dave’s class. He runs his own gang and his gang does all the things of an adult gang. 
    I would have to encourage this book because it is a good read especially for people that are looking for a new series of books. 

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Aq

    This book is so sad along with the first book a child called "it" but once you start reading i garantee you wont be able to stop. I would reccommend this book to anyone 12 and up beacause it is a mature book and hard to grasp your head around. I loved this book and i hope.you will too!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2012

    Sometimes all a person needs is a little love. The Lost Boy by D

    Sometimes all a person needs is a little love. The Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer is an inspiring story about a child that was in search of a home. This is a true story about Dave Pelzer&rsquo;s life. As a young child Dave was physically, emotionally, and mentally abused by his alcoholic mother. He was starved, beaten, and brutally screamed at constantly. Once placed in foster care all he wanted was to find a family that would love and care for him. Ultimately, Dave just wanted a place to call home. The main message of this story is to never give up. Be strong, and stand up for yourself; good things will come out of it in the end. As Dave fights to be free of his mother he never gives up. He gets transferred from house to house but never loses faith. Being such a young child, believing in himself, and having true faith after experiencing all those troubles can be one of the hardest things to do. Dave is truly an inspirational person. Another theme in this story is family. Family is one of the most precious things a person can have in their life. A lot of people take that for granted. People need to appreciate the little things in life. After reading this story a whole new view on life is experienced. Overall, I really liked this book. It made me realize how lucky I really am to have the life I have. It also kept my attention the entire time. You could pretty much visualize what was actually happening and feel the emotions Dave felt while he was experiencing all of this trauma. The one thing I didn&rsquo;t like is how heartbreaking the story actually was. I really felt for Dave and wanted to do something to help him get free and find a family. I didn&rsquo;t like the way he was treated and how horrible his life really was. I think everyone of high school age should read this book. It really makes someone understand the most important things in life. You get a whole new view on life and how lucky you really are. There is always someone out there less fortunate than you; so people shouldn&rsquo;t take advantage of what they have. Younger kids should not read this book because it would be hard for them to understand and grasp the concept of what is actually going on. Besides this book I would recommend A Child Called It, A Man Named Dave, and The Privilege of Youth. All of these books are part of a series written by Dave about his life and all the challenges he had to overcome to get where he is today. The Lost Boy is the second book in the series. I would rate this book 4 out of 5 stars. It was very touching and well written, but the story behind it all is very heartbreaking. You really feel for Dave and people that have to go through what has happened to him.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2012

    Dndjxjdjddjdmdd

    Amazing but my bff waz like so, oprah go beat 2 and i waz like yeah butthis was like sosad but like documented 2, girl

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2012

    Touching story of a boy and his struggle being the outcast of the family and looked down apon

    This book is a touching and startleing quest for a boy to find the mother he once new as the soft spoken kind woman figur he looked up to before the booze the fights and all the tocherous thing his mother did to him the guilt and sorrow he felt for always being the problem in his mothers marrige i give this book five stars

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    One of the best books I have ever read.

    I could not put this book down. Read within a day. I cried for this boy as he gives details of the horrible thinds he endured. High recommended... you will not be able to put it down and move right on the titles that gollow.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    I was so happy for David in this book.

    He goes to foster care, out of the reach of his mother. He makes friends and gets amazing foster parents. But that's not the whole book, not even close. There still is suspense, his mother, and......never mind. Im not spoiling it for you. Wanna know more? Read IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 25, 2012

    Great and fast read

    I enjoyed this book as much as the first book. It was also very informative and sad too.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2012

    Glad I read this

    I'm glad I read this book. I was very interested in what happened to Dave after the first book, so I'm glad I read this. However, this book was not as compelling as the first one. However, as I stated, I wanted to know what had happened to that poor little boy from "A child called 'it'", so this was worth the cost and the read, but if I had not read the first one, this would probably not held my interest.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    Great

    Great book!!!! Had suspense, drama, & heartfelt moments. Very interesting. Kept me on the edge of my seat. Nice ending. Can't wait to read the next book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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