Lost Boy, Lost Girl: Escaping Civil War in Sudan

Lost Boy, Lost Girl: Escaping Civil War in Sudan

4.1 8
by John Bul Dau
     
 

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One of thousands of children who fled strife in southern Sudan, John Bul Dau survived hunger, exhaustion, and violence. His wife, Martha, endured similar hardships. In this memorable book, the two convey the best of African values while relating searing accounts of famine and war. There’s warmth as well, in their humorous tales of adapting to American life.

Overview

One of thousands of children who fled strife in southern Sudan, John Bul Dau survived hunger, exhaustion, and violence. His wife, Martha, endured similar hardships. In this memorable book, the two convey the best of African values while relating searing accounts of famine and war. There’s warmth as well, in their humorous tales of adapting to American life. For its importance as a primary source, for its inclusion of the rarely told female perspective of Sudan’s lost children, for its celebration of human resilience, this is the perfect story to inform and inspire young readers.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Renee Farrah Vess
There is a surprising softness in the tone of the story about John and Martha enduring the civil war in Southern Sudan. John's life as a Dinka villager and Martha's life in the city of Juba were both upended, and they don't even seem angry about it. The book unfolds the separate lives and common struggles of John and Martha as children, teenagers, and adults during a time of peace, war, and refuge beginning in 1983. A book about survival and strength rather than anger and blame, it gets the point across of the immense turmoil and struggle of the southern Sudanese people without getting too frightening. Walking hundreds of miles with no shoes, disease, crocodiles, guns, lack of food and clean water, are endured with thoughts of life, family, pride, and hope. John and Martha's stories began to intertwine at a refugee camp, and they both sought a new life in the United States. This is a poignant story about persistence, showing how hard work can get you results and even miracles. This is a great starting point into further research about the civil war in Southern Sudan, and is perfect for group discussion. Reviewer: Renee Farrah Vess

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426307089
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
10/12/2010
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
117,395
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

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Lost Boy, Lost Girl: Escaping Civil War in Sudan 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sometimes children have to fight to survive, too. Sometimes they need to be brave for themselves. Unfortunately, hundreds of children in Sudan, Africa had to do just that. In the book "Lost Boy, Lost Girl"  John Bul Dau and Martha Arual Akech, tell their  stories about being children during the Southern Sudan civil war in Africa. Soldiers raided their villages, and they were forced to flee. They tell separate stories of how they had to find refuge after war, and then find safety after more war without parents to guide them.   It is a sad tale about how many people got separated from their families and had to find someone that they could rely on just to  survive. I enjoyed this book because even though it is sad, there is happiness throughout the book, too. It has some humor as well.  I recommend this book to all middle school students because it gives them an idea of how it was in Africa during this war, but isn’t a boring read at all. It kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time I was reading it. Sure, it is sad, but it is also a great book that many people would enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing book!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book Lost Boy, Lost Girl by John Bul Dau and Martha Arual Akech was emotionally tugging and  intense. It tells the story to two different groups traveling across the desert trying to escape the ongoing war. The imagery and descriptions were amazing, and they left you perfectly picturing the situation-- not always a  good thing. I thought the book itself was great, but at some points it was a little too graphic.The authors are really good at describing the situation, but many of the things they saw were perhaps too scary or vivid. I would recommend this book to anybody above the age of fifteen.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kiddos have to survrive,they need to be brave also protect themself from other people never listen to strangers
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good summer reading
Anonymous More than 1 year ago