Lost Boy No More: A True Story of Survival and Salvation

Overview

Lost Boy No More tells the incredible true story of Abraham Nhial—but the story is not his alone. As a nine year-old child, Abraham found himself orphaned as civil war in his homeland of Sudan ravaged his entire village because they refused to embrace Islam. His journey is one of a perilous walk along with 35,000 lost boys of Sudan who fled to Ethiopia. Abraham and others like him made it to the border but hard times were not over as he endured the refugee camps of Ethiopia. Abraham becomes a lost boy no more ...

See more details below
Paperback
$11.59
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$12.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (27) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $8.70   
  • Used (24) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Lost Boy No More tells the incredible true story of Abraham Nhial—but the story is not his alone. As a nine year-old child, Abraham found himself orphaned as civil war in his homeland of Sudan ravaged his entire village because they refused to embrace Islam. His journey is one of a perilous walk along with 35,000 lost boys of Sudan who fled to Ethiopia. Abraham and others like him made it to the border but hard times were not over as he endured the refugee camps of Ethiopia. Abraham becomes a lost boy no more when he discovers real salvation through Jesus Christ. Lost Boy No More gives more than a narrative of Abraham’s story. It also gives a history of Sudan and the persecution of Christians by Islamic militants.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nhial survived the unthinkable. Rebels attacked his village in southern Sudan in 1987, killing many dear to him. He ran into the jungle, meeting other "Lost Boys" and wandering with them for months, and survived by eating wild plants and even mud. He watched some of his companions attacked by lions and daily feared for his life. The Lost Boys-35,000 of them-found safety first in Ethiopia, and when attacked there moved on to Kenya, losing a great deal of their number in their escape across the Gilo River, where they were attacked by crocodiles, shot or drowned. Eventually, Nhial was one of the 4,000 relocated to the United States. He and the others dream of going back to rebuild Sudan into a peaceful and prosperous country. Nhial's story is told third-person, in Mills's voice, which drains its power. Numerous chapters in the middle of the book get weighed down with studies of Sudanese history, a comparison of Islam and Christianity (Nhial's own faith), details on the development of the Sudan People's Liberation Army, life in a refugee camp and the history of oil resources and slavery in southern Sudan. These facts are relevant, but they stop the progression of the story. The story is a page-turner; unfortunately, the book is not. (Nov. 15) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805431865
  • Publisher: B&H Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/15/2004
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,223,504
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2005

    What An Emotional Read

    Lost Boy No More will touch your heart and set your soul on fire! I cried as I read this emotional journey and the tribulations these boys went through. My heart cried out to them. Powerful and insightful, this is a must-read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2004

    A Powerful, Important Book

    Lost Boy No More is a powerful, important book. More than just a story, it is a challenge to every reader with a heart. Who among us can imagine our entire family being wiped out when we were only nine years old, leaving us desperately alone in a dangerous jungle environment? Yet that horrific reality happened to Abraham Nhial and 35,000 other boys of Sudan. Most people would expect these boys to revert to a survival-of-the-fittest mentality such as is recounted in William Golding¿s Lord of the Flies, where castaway boys turned on and murdered each other. Yet, with eleven-year-old boys as their eldest ¿ and thereby acting as their respected elders ¿ many Lost Boys sacrificed their own lives to help their brothers survive as thousands formed families and trudged barefoot through the jungle to tenuous safety in distant Ethiopia. Mark Twain, who loved to write about adventurous little boys, said, ¿Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear ¿ not absence of fear.¿ These Lost Boys did not choose their adventure, and they were desperately fearful. Yet they chose to master their fear and courageously press on, dodging poisonous snakes, lions, crocodiles, and raging rivers. Many did not survive. Those who did survive know that God has saved their lives so that they might live for others. Four thousand Lost Boys came to the United States, not to enjoy the ¿American dream,¿ but rather to secure an education so that they can go back to their beloved Sudan. There they hope to educate and serve their countrymen. Perhaps that will be the greatest challenge these Lost Boys No More will face, for war still rages in their homeland. Abraham Nhial¿s tragic, triumphant story is told through the able pen of DiAnn Mills, yet never in the entire narrative did I sense Mills¿ voice dominating. After telling his story, Nhial challenges the reader to look beyond self and help in the restoration of Sudan. Several practical ways of helping are listed. As a college English professor and published author, I heartily approve of and endorse this book. It is not entertainment. It is not meant to be. Rather, Lost Boy No More is a challenge to anyone who thinks he or she owns a heart of compassion.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)