Lost Boys

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Overview

Lost Boys, Slava Mogutin’s first monograph, is a compelling collection of his portraits and landscapes taken over the past ten years—since he was exiled from Russia for “malicious hooliganism with exceptional cynicism and extreme insolence.” Although it was his outspoken gay writing that angered the Soviet authorities, Mogutin’s photographs caused just as much controversy. Provocative yet iconoclastic, his work transcends the conventions of male nude photography, confronting the viewer/voyeur with a raw style and...
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Overview

Lost Boys, Slava Mogutin’s first monograph, is a compelling collection of his portraits and landscapes taken over the past ten years—since he was exiled from Russia for “malicious hooliganism with exceptional cynicism and extreme insolence.” Although it was his outspoken gay writing that angered the Soviet authorities, Mogutin’s photographs caused just as much controversy. Provocative yet iconoclastic, his work transcends the conventions of male nude photography, confronting the viewer/voyeur with a raw style and new sensibility. A cross between porn and fashion, pop culture and marginal kink, Lost Boys is a poetic and sometimes raunchy journey into different obsessions and fetishes of the cosmopolitan urban youth culture. Crimean rasta boys, Russian wrestlers and military cadets, German skinheads, and football hooligans are among the subjects of these incendiary but intimate portraits.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781576873304
  • Publisher: powerHouse Books
  • Publication date: 11/28/2006
  • Pages: 144
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.46 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Slava Mogutin was the last political dissident from the former Soviet Union and the first ever to become a porn star. He has received both critical acclaim and official condemnation for his outspoken writing. Chased out of his country at the age of 21, he was granted political asylum in the US with the support of Amnesty International and PEN American Center. Mogutin is the author of seven books in Russian, and his writing has been translated into and published in six languages. His photography has been exhibited internationally and featured in such diverse publications as i-D, Honcho, Visionaire, Bound &Gagged, BlackBook, Playgirl, Butt, and Stern.

Octavio Zaya is an independent curator and art writer. He is also an advisor to the Museum of Contemporary Art MUSAC, León, Spain; co-director of Atlántica, a bilingual quarterly magazine of art and culture; on the editorial boards of Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art and Lab 71; and a US correspondent for Flash Art. Zaya was also a co-curator of Documenta 11 and the 1st and 2nd Johannesburg Biennial. He was a co-editor of Fresh Cream (Phaidon Press, 2000) and has authored and contributed to numerous other books. Zaya is currently organizing the 1st Biennial of Photography at Petach-Tikva, Israel.

Dominic Johnson is a writer based in London. He is a visiting lecturer at Queen Mary, University of London, and is completing his PhD in the theory and history of visual art and performance at the Courtauld Institute of Art. He has lectured widely at such venues as King’s College London and Brown University, and is a regular contributor to periodicals and magazines, including Frieze and Dance Theatre Journal. He has published writing on artists including Genesis P-Orridge, Ron Athey, Vaginal Davis, and Manuel Vason, and is the editor of a forthcoming monograph on Franko B, to be published in 2006 by Pack.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2007

    Obsessions and Fetishes as Captured in the Photography of Slava Mogutin

    LOST BOYS, Slava Mogutin's first published monograph, sets out to shock and unveil the darker interstices of the lost youths who are the product of our urban moral decay. Mogutin was exiled form his native Russia for his 'malicious hooliganism with exceptional cynicism and extreme insolence', found his Gilead/asylum in the USA and has been highly visible as a performance artist and gay activist. This thin volume, with excessively wordy and pedantic verbal contributions by such luminaries as Octavio Zaya and Dominic Johnson, is a collection of Mogutin's photographs, basically of the male nude, but in Mogutin's case the nude figure is less important than the staged images he captures. In some images his thoughts are powerful: in some images there is little information and conflict that is supposed to illicit gut response from the viewer. Slava Mogutin's 'models' (the word is used instead of subjects, but the youths brought into this mélange are minimally attractive or interesting) are Russian wrestlers, military cadets, German skinheads, and football jocks - some at rest, some staged with bizarre sexually oriented stories, and some pushing the limits of sensual behavior. Some of the photographs succeed in inciting a visceral response from the viewer, and some simply feel like filler. That Slava Mogutin has something to say is obvious, especially if the Foreword and Essay are read prior to viewing the portfolio, but for this viewer there is less art and more social comment here, making this particular monograph difficult to assign in the very wide field of photographic art. Not a book for the squeamish but a viable statement from an exiled observer of some aspects of the human condition in this century. Grady Harp

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    This photo-journal is as much pornographic as it is a social com

    This photo-journal is as much pornographic as it is a social commentary. Some of the photographs are nude men while the majority show the depravity of an entire time/sect of people. I find it a poignant representation of an entire group of people under repression. Opinions differ and I understand that, however my husband and his brother, who were both born in the Soviet Union in the early 70's were able to see this fracture. This photo-journal does capture the repression of sexual freedom as well as individuality and individual expression that was prevalent through this time and the decades that have come to follow. There is homosexual male nudity although that is not the main focus of the book. Many of the photos are sensual if not all out sexual but the social message is much more important. Honestly, one of the photos is of snow on the trees in the central courtyard in Soviet tenements...looking at this photo without bias one can see the lack of individuality that is being exhibited...the nude photos are just spoken out against that. It is not a book for everyone but I do love it; its representation of an entire generation is heartbreaking and true.

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