The Lost Crown [NOOK Book]

Overview

Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia.  Like the fingers on a hand--first headstrong Olga; thenTatiana, the tallest; Maria the most hopeful for a ring; and Anastasia, the smallest. These are the daughters of Tsar Nicholas II, grand duchesses living a life steeped in tradition abd priviledge.  They are each on the brink of starting their own lives, at the mercy of royal matchmakers.  The summer of 1914 is that precious last wink of time when they can still be sisters together--sisters that ...
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The Lost Crown

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Overview

Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia.  Like the fingers on a hand--first headstrong Olga; thenTatiana, the tallest; Maria the most hopeful for a ring; and Anastasia, the smallest. These are the daughters of Tsar Nicholas II, grand duchesses living a life steeped in tradition abd priviledge.  They are each on the brink of starting their own lives, at the mercy of royal matchmakers.  The summer of 1914 is that precious last wink of time when they can still be sisters together--sisters that link arms and laugh, sisters that share their dreams and worries, and flirt with the officers of their imperial yacht.

But in a gunshot the future changes — for these sisters and for Russia.

As World War I ignites across Europe, political unrest sweeps Russia. First dissent, then disorder, mutiny — and revolution. For Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia, the end of their girlhood together is colliding with the end of more than they ever imagined.

At the same time hopeful and hopeless, naïve and wise, the voices of these sisters become a chorus singing the final song of Imperial Russia. Impeccably researched and utterly fascinating, this novel by acclaimed author Sarah Miller recounts the final days of Imperial Russia with lyricism, criticism and true compassion.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—This story of the last months of the Romanovs is told from the perspectives of the four grand duchesses: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. It is not an easy book to read—Russian names and nicknames, among other things, present constant challenges, but for dedicated readers, it is well worth the effort. The four points of view begin as virtually indistinguishable from one another, but emerge as strong, separate voices as the lives of the Romanovs become more and more circumscribed. Miller asks her readers to view events through the eyes of these girls while also applying the lens of historical perspective. Thus, Rasputin is loved and revered by the Romanov sisters. The grand duchesses lead, by their own account at least, a fairly Spartan life in the palace, which would hardly be the opinion of the Bolsheviks. They are surprised by the animosity that their beloved peasantry feels toward them, and are shocked by the small acts of cruelty perpetrated on them by their guards. The Lost Crown is a wonderful way to demonstrate that all history—not just historical fiction—has a point of view, but it is also a finely crafted, character-infused novel that leaves readers wishing it could have ended another way for the Romanovs. Miller includes many vintage photographs, an epilogue, author's note, glossary, and cast of characters. A finely wrought and complex novel.—Corinne Henning-Sachs, Walker Memorial Library, Westbrook, ME
From the Publisher
Tsar Nicholas II’s four ill-fated daughters provide a fictional, inside look at Imperial Russia’s dying days in this thoroughly researched, poignant and compelling account of how the deposed Romanovs coped with abdication and arrest from 1914 to 1918.

At the beginning of World War I, Russia’s grand duchesses, Olga (19), Tatiana (17), Maria (15) and Anastasia (13) lived privileged, protected lives with their mild-mannered father, Nicholas, their anxious mother, Alexandra and their hemophiliac younger brother, Aleksei. Relying on letters, diaries and photographs of the imperial family as well as memoirs of people who shared their last years, Miller imagines how war and revolution irrevocably transported the Romanovs from their palace to house arrest in rural Tobolsk and final captivity in Ekaterinburg. The human side of their story is related chronologically through the alternating first-person voices of insightful Olga, organized Tatiana, kind-hearted Maria and impish Anastasia. Removed from the political drama exploding outside their doors, Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia emerge as isolated, unique young women with their own dreams and fears. As they nurse wounded soldiers, care for their fretful mother, amuse their ailing brother and suffer humiliation and deprivation, the four sisters symbolize family devotion and enduring hope in the face of bitter fate.

A fascinating, moving exploration of the endlessly fascinating Romanovs, buttressed by extensive and fascinating backmatter. - KIRKUS, May 1, 2011, *STAR

The Lost Crown.
Miller, Sarah (Author)
Jun 2011. 448 p. Atheneum, hardcover, $17.99. (9781416983408).

The Russian Grand Duchesses, who were murdered by the Bolsheviks in 1918 along with the rest of their family, have become something of a literary mainstay. This thoroughly researched novel brings the four young women to readers in their own voices. In alternating chapters (each with a small photo of the
narrator), Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia report on their lives and their relationships and slowly but
surely reveal the perilous situation in which they find themselves. Each Grand Duchess comes across as a unique personality, with the best known, Anastasia, the most distinctive. But each girl is given time and space to reveal and reflect, and like the best historical novels, this allows modern-day teens to see parts of themselves in very different people. Sometimes the Russian words and history overwhelm the narrative, but by the heartbreaking book’s conclusion, readers will be caught up in the girls’ story. A glossary, a note about the Russian calendar, and an affecting epilogue complete the book.

BOOKLIST, April 15, 2011

Gr 8 Up–This story of the last months of the Romanovs is told from the perspectives of the four grand duchesses: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. It is not an easy book to read—Russian names and nicknames, among other things, present constant challenges, but for dedicated readers, it is well worth the effort. The four points of view begin as virtually indistinguishable from one another, but emerge as strong, separate voices as the lives of the Romanovs become more and more circumscribed. Miller asks her readers to view events through the eyes of these girls while also applying the lens of historical perspective. Thus, Rasputin is loved and revered by the Romanov sisters. The grand duchesses lead, by their own account at least, a fairly Spartan life in the palace, which would hardly be the opinion of the Bolsheviks. They are surprised by the animosity that their beloved peasantry feels toward them, and are shocked by the small acts of cruelty perpetrated on them by their guards. The Lost Crown is a wonderful way to demonstrate that all history–not just historical fiction–has a point of view, but it is also a finely crafted, character-infused novel that leaves readers wishing it could have ended another way for the Romanovs. Miller includes many vintage photographs, an epilogue, author’s note, glossary, and cast of characters. A finely wrought and complex novel.–Corinne Henning-Sachs, Walker Memorial Library, Westbrook, ME

- SLJ July 2011

"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world."
—Greg King, co-author of The Fate of the Romanovs and Resurrection of the Romanovs

"As Romanov fiction goes, this is probably the best of the bunch."
~ Helen Rappaport, author of The Last Days of the Romanovs: Tragedy at Ekaterinburg

Children's Literature - Jennifer Waldrop
Even though you probably know how The Lost Crown will end, Miller paints such vivid images of the characters that you cannot help but hold out hope that somehow it will not follow the path that history has dictated. The story is told from the viewpoints of the four Grand Duchesses: Anastasia, Maria, Tatiana, and Olga. While Anastasia is the most well-known of the Romanov daughters, and her voice is the strongest, it is equally compelling to see through the eyes of her lesser known sisters. The narrators take the reader from the idyllic life the girls were born into and follow the harrowing journey that ends in the cellar in Ekaterinburg. The end may be inevitable and heart breaking, but the journey is fascinating. My only criticism is that the book borders on being too long, probably due to the necessity of accommodating the four narrators. However, it never loses its hold on the reader. Reviewer: Jennifer Waldrop
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—This story of the last months of the Romanovs is told from the perspectives of the four grand duchesses: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. It is not an easy book to read—Russian names and nicknames, among other things, present constant challenges, but for dedicated readers, it is well worth the effort. The four points of view begin as virtually indistinguishable from one another, but emerge as strong, separate voices as the lives of the Romanovs become more and more circumscribed. Miller asks her readers to view events through the eyes of these girls while also applying the lens of historical perspective. Thus, Rasputin is loved and revered by the Romanov sisters. The grand duchesses lead, by their own account at least, a fairly Spartan life in the palace, which would hardly be the opinion of the Bolsheviks. They are surprised by the animosity that their beloved peasantry feels toward them, and are shocked by the small acts of cruelty perpetrated on them by their guards. The Lost Crown is a wonderful way to demonstrate that all history—not just historical fiction—has a point of view, but it is also a finely crafted, character-infused novel that leaves readers wishing it could have ended another way for the Romanovs. Miller includes many vintage photographs, an epilogue, author's note, glossary, and cast of characters. A finely wrought and complex novel.—Corinne Henning-Sachs, Walker Memorial Library, Westbrook, ME
Kirkus Reviews

Tsar Nicholas II's four ill-fated daughters provide a fictional, inside look at Imperial Russia's dying days in this thoroughly researched, poignant and compelling account of how the deposed Romanovs coped with abdication and arrest from 1914 to 1918.

At the beginning of World War I, Russia's grand duchesses, Olga (19), Tatiana (17), Maria (15) and Anastasia (13) lived privileged, protected lives with their mild-mannered father, Nicholas, their anxious mother, Alexandra and their hemophiliac younger brother, Aleksei. Relying on letters, diaries and photographs of the imperial family as well as memoirs of people who shared their last years, Miller imagines how war and revolution irrevocably transported the Romanovs from their palace to house arrest in rural Tobolsk and final captivity in Ekaterinburg. The human side of their story is related chronologically through the alternating first-person voices of insightful Olga, organized Tatiana, kind-hearted Maria and impish Anastasia. Removed from the political drama exploding outside their doors, Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia emerge as isolated, unique young women with their own dreams and fears. As they nurse wounded soldiers, care for their fretful mother, amuse their ailing brother and suffer humiliation and deprivation, the four sisters symbolize family devotion and enduring hope in the face of bitter fate.

A fascinating, moving exploration of the endlessly fascinating Romanovs, buttressed by extensive and fascinating backmatter. (Historical fiction.12 & up)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442423923
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 6/14/2011
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 296,546
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Sarah Miller began writing her first novel at 10 years old, and has spent half her life working in libraries and bookstores. She is the author of Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller, which was named an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and nominated for numerous state award lists. Sarah lives in Michigan with her family. Visit her online at sarahmillerbooks.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 20, 2011

    The Lost Crown

    This book clearly lays out the many events and circumstances surround the last Imperial Family of Russia. It also gives a vivid window into the duchesses lives and how the revolution affected them and their familiiies. It is evident that much research went into this book. Many books about the last Romanov Imperial Family focus on the Tsar, Tsarvich(Aleski), or Anastatia. I was pleased that this book did not "favor" one of its characters. This book is definately worth the read!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful read

    I recommend this book to any person who likes historical fiction. It tells the last years of the Romanovs through the eyes of the Tsar's four young daughter. Olga, Tatiana Maria and the famous Anastasia. Even though it is a work of fiction the writer has worked in actual events and letters as well as some of the things they say. Historical fiction can be very hard to write, especially when you include historical figures. I personally thought that more of the family could have been introduced for a change of pace but we really only hear from the seven and at times the Dr. It would have been nice to hear more from the servants that were held captive with them as well but the book is already really long and the absence of such characters does not distract from the quality fiction that it is.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Book Review: The Lost Crown

    It's hard to rate this book because it's really worth the read. Especially if you have any sort of interest in the last Tsar of Imperial Russia and his family. It's different than other books I've read about them in the sense that it's told from the Dutchesses points of view. And I would think of this as historical fiction at it's purest. You know things are fabricated, but you get the feeling that this could be how they felt about the things happening around them. It read almost like a biography.

    I really enjoyed many aspects of this novel. While switching between 4 points of view could get confusing at times, Miller manages to give each sister distinct personalities. With each voice, we learn how each sister felt about what was happening around them. I also felt a true sense of family among them. No matter what, they were in it together. I was surprised at how naive they seemed to be about the outside world. They lead extremely sheltered lives. I while it was one of privilege, in many ways it wasn't. It seems the life the people didn't see differed greatly from the ones the commoners did see.

    What stuck me most of the common thread of hope and trust that each of the sisters shared. I almost wish to know how the Tsar and Empress felt during this time. The sisters took each humiliation in stride with the dignity of royalty. They also felt like eventually the people would see the error of their ways and release them. That above all the common love of Russia would set them free. During all of this they never seemed to behave as if they were in captivity and treated no better than criminals.

    What was hardest for me about the book, and why I gave it a 3 rating, is that it's long. The longer this book gets, the more you care about the sisters. The more you care, the more depressing it gets. Because no matter what happens, you know how it ends. The Romanov's were all killed. And the way it all plays out, it seems almost cowardly. It's horrific. So, it's really hard to read a novel that you know there is no happy every after.

    I was pleased that the actual details on the deaths are in an author's note. The actual ending is more of a fade to black. Miller has done her research and it shows. There's lots of details at the end, including some on the theory of Anastasia getting away. There's also information on the 2 graves that have been found which put a rest to the theory. I also loved the included pictures and would love to see a finished copy of this book. An ARC ebook I'm sure does not give this justice!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Mediocre and very limited look at the last few months of the liv

    Mediocre and very limited look at the last few months of the lives of the Romanov family

    Once upon a time, Russia was ruled by royalty. Like all monarchies, the czar’s word was law, and - like the world over regardless of government type – there were good czars and poor czars. All of them were subject to the problems of their times. Between a world war, a crippling economy, and a growing workers movement, the last czar faced very unique pressures that none of his predecessors had to face. In The Lost Crown, Sarah Miller explores the impact these forces had, not on the czar but on his family. As they struggle to understand how they can go from being a beloved national treasure to enforced imprisonment by the same people, so too do the readers as they get a glimpse of what life was like in those final months before the Russian crown was forever lost.

    As with any novel utilizing multiple narrators, keeping track of which Grand Duchess is speaking in each scene can prove to be very challenging. There were many a time when the story required flipping to the beginning of the chapter to see which narrator was telling the story. Even though there are differences between each narrator’s voice, the differences are slight when taken as a whole and do not offset the similarities among them, of which there are many.

    Similarly, Ms. Miller uses the multiple viewpoints in an attempt to present a broader picture of what was occurring in Russia and what was happening to the family. Unfortunately, because the family stayed together, either by choice or by being forced into close quarters, the viewpoints of the girls does not vary all that much. The older daughters have a better grasp on the seriousness of their situation, but other than that, all four are limited in their understanding of the revolution and its total impact on not only Russia but on their family as well. In fact, much of the time, the girls are in a state of disbelief that there is a noticeable decrease in the reverence towards the Czar and his family. Because there is so little difference of opinion or of understanding among the four girls, the use of four narrators does nothing but overcomplicates the story and bogs down the overall narrative.

    While Ms. Miller does not gloss over the hardships the family faced as the revolution swept across Russia, the complex politics and economics behind the revolution are all but ignored. This lack of backdrop provides some surprising consequences. On the one hand, the lack of background information serves to highlight how sheltered the girls were from the outside world. Yet, without this crucial macro-level information, key elements of the revolution become nothing but a young girl’s rant at the unfairness of the world. Granted, from the girls’ perspective, their rough treatment, their subsequent imprisonment, and ultimate fate are unfair, but there is always another side of the equation and to avoid discussing this with younger readers diminishes the importance of what happened and its future consequences for the world at large.

    The Lost Crown is definitely meant for younger audiences. While the rest of the world concerns itself with a world war, food shortages, economic hardships, and the like, the Romanov children worry about keeping their brother safe, boys, clothes, and their familial happiness. Theirs is a very isolated and self-centered world, and they remain blissfully ignorant – partially by choice and partially by role – of what is occurring outside the palace walls. Because they are so young, their self-centeredness is understandable because being self-absorbed is a top teen characteristic. Younger readers can and will appreciate their frolicking and obliviousness, but older readers will find their ignorance and self-absorption disconcerting, made all the more tragic by their utter confusion and shock when the outside world begins to impose its will on the family.

    In The Lost Crown, Ms. Miller attempts to show the world the Russian Revolution from the Romanov perspective. By writing it for young adults and using a narrow, young, and one-sided perspective, she further romanticizes the Romanovs and their fate. There is nothing wrong with that because what happened to the entire family was terrible. Still, one cannot help but feel that an opportunity was lost to help explain the other side, why the peasants revolted as they did and how the revolt was hijacked by others to further their own socialist agenda. Historical fiction is best when one can learn something from it, and the novel fails in this regard. Between this disappointing omission and the confusion wrought by the multiple narrators, the story fails to impress older readers. Even younger readers may find the lack of romantic interest, the nebulous understanding of the circumstances, and the very unhappy ending to be a bit too much for one’s thorough enjoyment of the story. It is a disappointing reaction to a novel that looks gorgeous and has such amazing potential behind it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    The Lost Crown

    Having read books on the Romanovs, I knew how this book would end. But what pleased me the most was the different viewpoints. Most books on the Romanovs focus on Anastasia. I was surprised to hear from the viewpoints of her older sisters. Olga seemed worried about everything, Tatiana wants to take care of everyone, and Maria dreams of marrying a soldier. Even knowing their fate, I still hoped that the girls would be set free. I became attached to them all as I neared the final chapters, sharing their hopes and dreams. Ms. Miller did spectacular work with her research and I would enjoy reading more novels like this. I recommend The Lost Crown to lovers of Russian history.

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  • Posted November 28, 2012

    I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!! You don't hear much about the Russ

    I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!! You don't hear much about the Russian duchesses in world war one, and I felt like I was right there. This book is so heartfelt, and the end oh my gosh I cannot even begin! Everything they endured, and then that! The book was also lovely, because of the facts supporting the book. You can most definitely see that the author Sarah did her research. If you haven't read this book I say it is a must, it really makes you think about what you are thankful for! While also giving you a mini history lesson, and no I don't mean it in the boring way, but in a WONDERFUL way. LOved it. Read it. Change your life. This is that type of book!

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  • Posted October 4, 2011

    Good

    I thought this book would be much eaiser to comprehend. It was in part russian and not the same rammer

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 24, 2011

    Interesting Historical Novel

    This book covers the last few years of the Romanovs through the eyes of the four daughters- Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. The start of World War I and the Bolshevik revolution is seen through their eyes. They are very sheltered as Grand Duchesses. They don't really get to see a lot of the world outside their palaces and vacations together. This changes some as the war goes on, and the girls minister to the troops in a local hospital. Soon however, they are caught up in a revolution that forces their father to abdicate. They are taken to Tobolsk and put under house arrest. Later, as Russia becomes more deeply embroiled in civil war, they are taken to Ekatarinburg where they are murdered.

    I found it hard to read about these girls know what would happen to them. They come across as very sweet girls who were involved in something much bigger than they were. The point of view switches between each girl throughout the book. Anastasia's sections read as very young. You get a real sense of her personality and joy for life in her sections. There is less difference in the writing of the three older girls, but you still are able to get a sense of their different personalities.

    Although the author admits she takes some liberties, I didn't mind. It made for a very interesting story. I wanted to be able to change history and let those girls live their lives for much longer. They had so many hopes and aspirations. As they are walking to the basement in the Ekaterinburg, they have no idea this is the end. It was so sad to read. I think that people who enjoy history, especially Russian history, will find this book very interesting. I know I did. Even though I knew how it was going to end, I found it fascinating to read it all from the girls' perspectives. This book is a great way to see history through the eyes of some major participants.

    Galley provided by publisher for review.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good Book

    Lately, I have been reading quite a few books that have to deal with war. I am happy that I can read and see different points of views of war. So many people are involved, there are so many stories to tell. This one, with the fours sisters, tells of their time in the war. These sisters, stick by each to other, helping out, even being nurses in the war.

    Slowly these girls after being sheltered, start to see things differently. They of course were royalty, but I loved that they did not act like it. They get scared and pray a lot. The war is getting worse and everything is changing quickly right in front of their eyes. The storyline switches from point of views a lot, like every chapter. I was a bit confused with the pov changes.

    Now the way that these four young ladies held the family together is awesome. I loved how they treated everyone with respect even though they weren't treated that way. They show so much strength during the uproar, that it began to change people minds. The profound affect that these ladies had is great to see.

    This book is a great historical read. The descriptions of war, the love of their family that held them together made me smile.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 21, 2012

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    Posted August 8, 2012

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    Posted November 10, 2011

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    Posted January 20, 2012

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    Posted December 25, 2011

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