Lost Dogs and Lonely Hearts

Lost Dogs and Lonely Hearts

4.1 19
by Lucy Dillon
     
 

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An irresistible novel about women, men, and the dogs that own them.

Thirty-nine year old Rachel is having a really bad year. After losing her job and breaking up with her boyfriend, Rachel has inherited her late aunt's house, her beloved border collie, and a crowded rescue kennel, despite the fact that she knows almost nothing about dogs. Still,

Overview

An irresistible novel about women, men, and the dogs that own them.

Thirty-nine year old Rachel is having a really bad year. After losing her job and breaking up with her boyfriend, Rachel has inherited her late aunt's house, her beloved border collie, and a crowded rescue kennel, despite the fact that she knows almost nothing about dogs. Still, considering her limited options, she gamely takes up the challenge of running the kennel. And as Rachel starts finding new homes for the abandoned strays, it turns out that it might not just be the dogs that need rescuing.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this engaging and stirring novel, Dillon (The Ballroom Class) vividly evokes the lives of three women and their unexpectedly connected fates. Successful and chic, Rachel, nearly 40 and alone after a 10-year relationship falls apart, inherits her aunt's kennel. She moves to the outskirts of London to make sense of the bewildering bequest and discovers a close-knit community, including handsome veterinarian George. Zoe, divorced for one year, is at her wits' end when her ex gives their kids a puppy, until she finds some help and solace at the kennel. Natalie, married to the man of her dreams, yearns for a baby and is comforted by their foster dog. Despite a slow start, Dillon weaves a beautiful and gripping tale of loss, friendship, and starting over that will tug at readers' heartstrings and keep them hooked till the very end. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101478752
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
159,601
File size:
434 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Lucy Dillon lives in Herefordshire with her husband and a pair of Basset hounds, Bonham and Violet.

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Lost Dogs and Lonely Hearts 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
PumpkinKV More than 1 year ago
Well I laughed and cried while reading this book. It was so much fun to read and is definitely light reading. A classic where animals bring humans together. Get the book, it will put a smile on your face. Now I noticed that the author has a new book coming out in December 2011. I just pre-ordered it. I have the faith in this author.
harstan More than 1 year ago
At about the same time her decade long relationship ends, thirty-nine year old Rachel inherits her aunt's home, dog, and kennel. Not sure what to make of the will as she never expected the bequest, Rachel decides to move to her aunt's home on the London outer perimeter. She finds the kennel overwhelmed with rescued canines and her aunt's neighbors to be friendly with each other and welcoming to the newcomer. Rachel decides to run the kennel as best she can though she knows nothing about dogs and sees good homes for her wards. Rachel meets divorce veterinarian George who is over the edge with his former wife who gave their children a puppy. Rachel befriends married Natalie who wants a baby but for now settles on coddling their "foster" dog. The kennel owner finds other nice people as she explains a house is not a home without a dog sharing the digs. Mindful of the Groucho quip "Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend; Inside of a dog it's too dark to read", this is an enjoyable second chance at life as the beleaguered but happy heroine finds rescuing canines ironically saves her. This is Rachel's makeover but the strong cast; canines included especially her roommate provide a warm contemporary tale that encourages the audience to learn what makes you happy and risk seeking it. Harriet Klausner
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This was a heartwarming story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A delightful book. Very clever.
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Tribute_Books_Reviews More than 1 year ago
Ah, angst. When women are stressed out and dealing with emotional life changing events, they tend to worry themselves to no end. For a book with dogs in the title and two canines gracing the cover, this comes as a bit of a surprise to those expecting a warm and fuzzy read. With the introduction to an American audience of her UK release "Lost Dogs and Lonely Hearts," author Lucy Dillon is hoping to connect with readers who fell in love with uber-successful, pet-themed novels like "Marley & Me" and "Dewey the Library Cat." However, what sets this story apart is not its four-legged characters, but rather the well-rounded, realistic depictions of three women facing the day-to-day struggles of ordinary life. Rachel, Zoe and Natalie are not superwomen, but neither are they one-dimensional puppets used to advance the plot. Their inner motivations and thought processes ring true. They say things they shouldn't and behave in ways that are inappropriate. But that's what makes them real. They have problems and issues that they are doing their best to deal with. What helps them through the hardships and frustrations are their dogs who remain steadfast amidst the psychological tumult. Rachel is the super chic, London career woman. At 39, she leaves her married lover and her prestigious job to run her deceased aunt's boarding kennel/dog rescue. She also inherits her Border Collie, Gem, who serves as a guide helping her negotiate the path from getting her hair cut in a posh salon to cleaning cages on her hands and knees. Add to the mix George, the town veterinarian, who the local women whisper looks just like Daniel Craig. Just when Rachel thinks she might be able to adjust to her new life in the country, an unexpected revelation and a visitor from her past threaten to disrupt her new-found serenity. Zoe is the newly divorced mom of two young boys. When her husband cheated on her and ran off with a younger woman, she was left holding the bag. Struggling to make ends meet on a hairdresser's salary and battling for alimony and child support, her ex selfishly dumps Toffee, a new Labrador puppy, in her lap in order to buy his sons' affections. At her wits end trying to keep things together, she turns to Rachel for help. They agree to a weekday doggy daycare arrangement with Zoe agreeing to walk the kennel dogs on Saturday mornings as a part of a volunteer group. Little does she realize that this set-up will lead her right into the arms of the handsome Dr. Bill. Finding herself more and more attracted to the charming physician, she must steel herself against his anti-children proclamation especially since she never worked up the courage to tell him that she's a mother. Natalie is on the fast track to promotion as a marketing executive when her company unexpectedly lays her off. With ample time on her hands, she decides along with her husband, Johnny that they can now focus on starting a family. However, their plans go awry when Natalie fails to conceive. As the stress starts to mount regarding infertility treatments and doctor visits, they decide to serve as foster parents to a Basset Hound named Bertie from Rachel's kennel. As they start to drift apart and blame each other for their conception troubles, Bertie becomes a vital link in helping them remember what's most important in life. Overall, this is a more introspective and fully formed narrative than the average chick lit/pet story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a former Basset Hound owner, Bertie was my favorite. Although somewhat predictable, the book was a most enjoyable read. I liked that the book promoted animal rescue in such a positive manner while telling about the cruelties of puppy mills.