The Lost Girl

The Lost Girl

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by D. H. Lawrence
     
 

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Published first in 1920, D.H. Lawrence's sixth novel The Lost Girl won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction that year. Following nearly the same lines as his fourth novel The Rainbow (1915), The Lost Girl tells the story of Alvina Houghton, a girl from a middle-class English family, who is driven by her individualistic urge to choose a mate for herself

Overview

Published first in 1920, D.H. Lawrence's sixth novel The Lost Girl won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction that year. Following nearly the same lines as his fourth novel The Rainbow (1915), The Lost Girl tells the story of Alvina Houghton, a girl from a middle-class English family, who is driven by her individualistic urge to choose a mate for herself while familial influences secretly thwart her choice.

This classic novel has been formatted for optimal viewing on the Nook and is equipped with an active Table of Contents for smooth and simple navigation!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014505369
Publisher:
A & L eBooks
Publication date:
05/03/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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The Lost Girl 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I never write reviews but I was so amazed by this novel that I had to. It starts of a little slow and in so doing allows you to really understand the characters... but then the events and the action pick up. Very advanced and beautifully written. Left an excellent loose end for me to wonder about long after I finished reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is by 21st century stards, almost painfully slow. I recommend reading this on a wintery day when the power is out or it will seem to go on forever. It was written in a time of transition when life moved slowly, but a whole nrw age eas about to start. Just one thing -- what kept me going was to find out how it all comes out, but we are left without an outcome! It's like reading Edwin Drood! Rather unsatisfying.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago