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Lost Girls: A Novel
     

Lost Girls: A Novel

4.3 9
by Andrew Pyper
 

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This spellbinding literary ghost story won raves when it was first published in 2000, with The Boston Globe hailing Bartholomew Crane as "a protagonist for the new millennium" and The New York Times declaring, "Everything about this dark, disquieting story confounds expectations."

When hotshot young attorney Barth Crane is shipped off into the

Overview

This spellbinding literary ghost story won raves when it was first published in 2000, with The Boston Globe hailing Bartholomew Crane as "a protagonist for the new millennium" and The New York Times declaring, "Everything about this dark, disquieting story confounds expectations."

When hotshot young attorney Barth Crane is shipped off into the backwoods town of Murdoch, Ontario to try his first murder case, nothing is as it seems. First of all, there are no bodies.

Two teenage girls have disappeared and although their bodies have not been found, their English teacher has been arrested and charged with murder. Crane, a city lawyer with a burgeoning cocaine problem and disdain for the bumbling townspeople, is convinced he can successfully defend his client, Thomas Tripp, in the absence of hard evidence—let alone a body.

But Tripp is not forthcoming with his lawyer and the locals are just as wary of Barth Crane as he is of them. And faced with increasing isolation and whispered legends of the town’s infamous ghost—the Lady of the Lake—not to mention his own drug-fueled paranoia, Crane finds himself less confident as the trial wears on and the lost girls demand to be heard . . . seemingly from beyond the grave.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781476764511
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
11/05/2013
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
99,384
File size:
3 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Andrew Pyper is the author of eight novels, including The Only Child and The Demonologist, which won the International Thriller Writers award for Best Hardcover Novel and was selected for the Globe and Mail’s Best 100 Books of 2013 and Amazon’s 20 Best Books of 2013. Among his previous books, Lost Girls won the Arthur Ellis Award and was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and The Killing Circle was a New York Times Best Crime Novel of the Year. Three of Pyper’s novels, including The Demonologist and The Damned, are in active development for feature film. He lives in Toronto. Visit AndrewPyper.com.

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Lost Girls 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There's no way this was close to $10 good. With all the hype I expected much more. Not scary or terrifying at all. Not much mystery either. In fact at times it was easy to get lost and not even realize what was going on. I think 3 stars was generous.
EclecticReaderAL More than 1 year ago
For me, this book took a little getting into. I didn't start to feel impelled to read it until I got about a third of the way in. The reveal at the climax was obvious almost from the beginning. Bartholomew Crane is a tortured lawyer on cocaine representing his first murderer. Atmosphere is the chief focus - the book moves from dark to suffocating. At some point you connect with Crane and go along for his ride. I didn't find the writing to be new and different so much as old-style gothic. The book has the tone, the style, and the dark setting to make it feel like a classic Gothic novel. Good reading for a first novel, I just picked up Wildfire Season by Pyper. I am anxious to see if he has upped his game.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book! Pyper's style of writing is unique. He reminds me of Alice Hoffman. I'll definately read his other books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I WAS A LITTLE SKEPTICAL WHEN STARTING THE BOOK BUT TWO SENTENCES INTO IT I WAS HOOKED. I READ AND READ. I AM REALLY IMPRESSED WITH THE QUALITY OF THIS NEW WRITERS ABILILIES. GOOD JOB
Guest More than 1 year ago
it kept me at the end of my seat i loved it
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bartholomew Christian Crane is a lost soul of questionable lawyerly morality. His first murder trial is the case of the lost girls, two missing teenagers from Murdoch, an odd little town in northern Ontario. Barth relies on sarcasm and cocaine as he encounters strippers, a ghost and his strange client. Will he emerge from this trial unscathed? Author Pyper's background as a poet is evident from the opening paragraph of this, his debut novel. The story is liberally sprinkled with Pyper's own brand of humor, spiced with unique imagery and the authentic flavor of the north. He had me hooked from the opening scene and he's Canadian, too. If you enjoy intelligent crime fiction, suspenseful fantasy or well-crafted stories, this book is a must-read. But be warned, this is not a typical court-room drama or a brain-candy upper. The story is soulful, depressing and riveting.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Garth Crane is a high powered Toronto attorney who relishes the rush he receives when he wins a case. Ethics are not a problem, as Barth will do anything to triumph, including lying under oath, cheating, and tampering with witnesses.

The tightly focused lawyer travels to Murdoch, Ontario on his first murder case. Local high school teacher Thomas Tripp is accused of killing two students. Barth expects an easy victory because the bodies of the victims were never recovered nor are there any witnesses that Tripp committed a crime. Circumstantial evidence links the suspect to the murder. The barrister settles in at the local hotel and begins to immerse himself in the life of the town in an effort to gain an edge for his client. Gradually, the legend of the Lady in the Lake begins to haunt him; changing him and making him take actions that will effect Garth for the rest of his life.

LOST GIRLS is an atmospheric work that seems gothic in tone. The story line gradually builds up the tension level until the reader feels, like Garth, overwhelmed and anxious. Garth is a loathsome person, yet the audience will feel drawn to him, especially as he travels down a road nobody could have foreseen he would take. Andrew Pyper¿s ability to bring his story to life is brilliant and will leave readers clamoring for more works as soon as possible. Don¿t be surprised if this book hits the charts.

Harriet Klausner