Lost in Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia

Lost in Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia

by Mark Salzman
     
 

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From the author of Iron & Silk comes a charming and frequently uproarious account of an American adolescence in the age of Bruce Lee, Ozzy Osborne, and Kung Fu. As Salzman recalls coming of age with one foot in Connecticut and the other in China (he wanted to become a wandering Zen monk), he tells the story of a teenager trying to attain enlightenment before he's

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Overview

From the author of Iron & Silk comes a charming and frequently uproarious account of an American adolescence in the age of Bruce Lee, Ozzy Osborne, and Kung Fu. As Salzman recalls coming of age with one foot in Connecticut and the other in China (he wanted to become a wandering Zen monk), he tells the story of a teenager trying to attain enlightenment before he's learned to drive.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Salzman's memoir of his Connecticut childhood tells of his early adolescent devotion to Zen and Kung Fu. (July)
Library Journal
Salzman (The Soloist, LJ 10/15/93) pens the memoir of the childhood and adolescence of an unconventional person growing up in a conventional family in a conventional suburban neighborhood. His refreshing, readable story follows the narrator through a number of unusual experiences as he tries kung-fu, Chinese art and language, Zen writings, playing classical and jazz cello, Indian music, and marijuana. He uses these experiences and the many people he meets to seek the answers to the ultimate questions of life. He finally comes to grips with the idea that no one he has met nor any of his consciousness-raising experiences has been able to provide him with the ultimate answers. He does learn that people seem to be able to live happily with the knowledge that some answers are unattainable. In the end, he is even able to accept his curmudgeonly father, to whom he dedicated the book. The reader will smile and nod in agreement at these wonderful descriptions. Recommended for all public libraries.David Schau, Kanawha Cty. P.L., Charleston, W.Va.
School Library Journal
YA-As a youth, Salzman was remarkably self-directed and came from a loving and supportive family. At 13, he saw his first kung fu movie with actor Bruce Lee and decided on the spot to become a ``wandering Zen monk.'' His parents allowed him the freedom to pursue this new interest. After much meditating and practicing at home, he enrolled in a martial-arts school. Soon the boy's interest in Asian philosophy and mysticism led him to study the Chinese language, which in turn led to practicing and learning the art of Chinese brush painting. All of these interests are described as adventures, some of which are frightening; others are simply wonderful fun. All are interesting. Readers come away from this memoir refreshed and inspired by this young person's quest to become ``someone'' and to discover himself. This very different journey through adolescence is a delight to read, and is one that many YAs will relate to and enjoy.-Helen Lazar, Kings Park Library, Fairfax County, VA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679767787
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/1996
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
474,194
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 7.98(h) x 0.62(d)

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