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Lost in the Grooves: Scram's Capricious Guide to the Music You Missed
     

Lost in the Grooves: Scram's Capricious Guide to the Music You Missed

by Kim Cooper (Editor), David Smay (Editor)
 

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Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's The Magical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's The Communists Are Coming to

Overview

Do you remember these great pop stars and their hits? Deerhoof's The Man, The King, The Girl Butch Hancock's West Texas Waltzes and Dust Blown Tractor Tunes, Swamp Dogg's Cuffed, Collared and Tagged, Michael Head's The Magical World Of The Strands, John Trubee's The Communists Are Coming to Kill Us, John Phillips's Wolf King of L.A., and Michel Magne's Moshe Mouse Crucifiction? You will when you read Lost in the Grooves, a fascinating guide to the back alleys off the pop music superhighway.
Pop music history is full of little-known musicians, whose work stands defiantly alone, too quirky, distinctive, or demented to appeal to a mass audience. This book explores the nooks and crannies of the pop music world, unearthing lost gems from should-have-been major artists (Sugarpie DeSanto, Judee Sill), revisiting lesser known works by established icons (Marvin Gaye's post-divorce kissoff album, Here My Dear; The Ramones' Subterranean Jungle), and spotlighting musicians who simply don't fit into neat categories (k. mccarty, Exuma). The book's encyclopedic alphabetical structure throws off strange sparks as disparate genres and eras rub against each other: folk-psych iconoclasts face louche pop crooners; outsider artists set their odd masterpieces down next to obscurities from the stars; lo-fi garage rock cuddles up with the French avant-garde; and roots rock weirdoes trip over bubblegum. This book will delight any jukebox junkie or pop culture fan.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Record collector geeks and hipster music critics love to pledge allegiance to the obscure. Cooper and Smay, co-editors of the renowned Los Angeles `zine Scram, have compiled just the book for those snobs-a trade-scale, alphabetical encyclopedia of albums that the authors think we (i.e., the mass majority) overlooked. This lesson in musical obscurity works because Cooper and Smay aren't serving up a heavy-handed slap in the face; instead, their list of unheralded gems is delivered in the voice of that cool older kid who turned you on to the Sex Pistols back in sixth grade. Along with records by indie heroes like Jandek and Captain Beefheart, the authors share their love of lesser-known discs by "mainstream" artists like Willie Nelson, Terrence Trent D'Arby, and Thin Lizzy. At its best, this is a travel guide for adventurous music connoisseurs. Recommended for all libraries that exploit the English language, especially those that hold the authors' previous collaboration, Bubblegum Music Is the Naked Truth.-Robert Morast, Argus Leader, Sioux Falls, SD Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415969987
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
10/01/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Kim Cooper and David Smay are founders/coeditors of the fanzine, Scram, which is devoted to pop music obscurities. Scram was an editor's choice in Factsheet 5 for "unusually great writing" and sited by LA Weekly as a best-of-LA publication. They are coeditors of Bubblegum Music Is the Naked Truth: The Dark History of Prepubescent Pop from the Banana Splits to Britney Spears.

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