Lost in the Ozone

Lost in the Ozone

5.0 5
by Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen
     
 
This is the monumental debut by one of insurgent country's pioneer bands. Playing with electric instruments, including the all important steel and fiddle, and a good dose of irreverence allowed the band to adhere to their own agenda. This first release was only a taste of the things to come. A combination of original tunes and some dusty covers, See more details below

Overview

This is the monumental debut by one of insurgent country's pioneer bands. Playing with electric instruments, including the all important steel and fiddle, and a good dose of irreverence allowed the band to adhere to their own agenda. This first release was only a taste of the things to come. A combination of original tunes and some dusty covers, Cody & His Airmen were at the head of a parade that continued on through the '90s. Songs by Billy C. Farlow like "Daddy's Gonna Treat You Right" and the ever-popular "Lost in the Ozone" were instant hits with the country-rock and hippie crowds. But, the rednecks loved them, too, and this was an amazing social phenomenon. Cody, whose real name is George Frayne, partnered with Farlow on a number of songs from this first collection that still pack a wallop. "Wine Do Yer Stuff" and the tearful "Seeds and Stems (Again)" left no doubt where these boys were coming from. A strong honky tonk album that swings, Lost in the Ozone is a viable recording. Cover tunes performed with energy and humor won crowds over everywhere. "Hot Rod Lincoln" is still played on outlaw country radio stations, as is "20 Flight Rock," a boogie number that lets everything hang out. With not a single cut wasted, this is one of the buried gems of modern country music that displays guitarman Bill Kirchen at his wildest and Bruce Barlow, Lance Dickerson, Andy Stein, John Tichy, Bobby Black, West Virginia Creeper, Farlow, and Commander Cody comin' out of the shoot ready to change the world for the better.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Mca
UPC:
0076731118529
catalogNumber:
31185
Rank:
763

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Commander Cody   Primary Artist,Piano,Vocals,Track Performer
Bill Kirchen   Guitar,Trombone,Vocals,Vocal Harmony
Bruce Barlow   Bass,Vocals,Vocal Harmony
Lance Dickerson   Drums,Vocals
Billy C. Farlow   Harmonica,Harp,Vocals
George Frayne   Keyboards,Vocals
Andy Stein   Fiddle,Violin,Saxophone
John Tichy   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Vocals,Vocal Harmony
West Virginia Creeper   Steel Guitar

Technical Credits

Willie Nelson   Composer
Eddie Cochran   Composer
Commander Cody   Producer
Bob Cohen   Producer,Engineer
Chris Frayne   Cover Art
Fairchild   Composer
Bob Cohen   Producer

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Lost in the Ozone 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
rushCA More than 1 year ago
I thought this CD was literally "Lost in the Ozone." Except for Hot Rod Lincoln I haven't heard most of these songs in 30 years. A real good "Blast from the Past." Good price also.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Looking at the photo of Commander Cody and his band on the back cover of this album, you cannot be prepared for the tracks that the boys put down. This album will please fans of country, gospel, rock & roll, and easy listening. My personal favorite, ''Seeds and stems again'' is as soulfull a blues number as you could ever wish for. The ''Family Bible'' makes you wish for Momma's hug again. The album is a true masterpiece that is as entertaining as it is timeless.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an outstanding first album from a new band. The hit song "Hot Rod Lincoln" is on this album. Commander Cody and The Lost Planet Airmen throw away the normal formula for music that so many bands did back in the 1970's. The music created a new type of sound called "Truck Stop Rock", with their emphasis on the truck driving culture. The music is Texas Swing to Country Rock to just great Rock-And-Roll. This is gem of an album from the 1970's. Innovative, unique, this band was also a favorite as a live bar band. The Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen maybe the most original rock-and-roll music from the 1970's. The first album was a gem and many albums afterwards were great.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an outstanding first album from a new band. The hit song "Hot Rod Lincoln" is on this album. Commander Cody and The Lost Planet Airmen throw away the normal formula for music that so many bands did back in the 1970's. The music created a new type of sound called "Truck Stop Rock", with their emphasis on the truck driving culture. The music is Texas Swing to Country Rock to just great Rock-And-Roll. This is gem of an album from the 1970's. The Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen maybe the most original rock-and-roll music from the 1970's. The first album was a gem and many albums that followed were great.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Back when hippies were freakin' out to the latest sounds from London, these guys come along and prove that there is enough fantastic American music in the trash can of obscurity to blow England off the map. This was a time when you had to buy an Everly Brothers or Gene Vincent album as a German Import (we thought our american treasures weren't cool). This was truly a musicians band. Bill Kirchen (maybe the greatest living telecaster master) and the rest of the band (nothin' but hot licks ala Bob Wills) could switch from rockabilly to pure honky-tonk to swing to boogie without bowing to fashion or commercialism. The result of this is a celebration of American music, connecting to the hippie culture, and creating the "Cosmic Cowboy" or "Redneck Hippie" movement that resulted in the big country rock explosion. Why in the hell arent these guys in the rock n' roll hall of fame? Because they were true artists that changed the face of music only to have others come along and spew out commercial droppings and make millions (see Eagles). I must say, I remember where I was when I first heard Sgt. Peppers and I remember where I was when I first heard Hot Rod Lincoln on top 40 radio. Both of these were great moments in the history of Rock n' roll. If you are a musician and always dreamed of playing in a hot bar band but only wanted to split the money w/3 other people, check out how good it could sound if you were truly in it for the music and split w/6 others.