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Lost New York
     

Lost New York

5.0 3
by Marcia Reiss
 

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Like a parallel universe, an entire city could be formed with the lost buildings of New York Citys past. Lost New York is a walk through this virtual metropolis. More than an architectural tour, it is a fascinating view of the citys ever-changing landscape and way of life, from magnificent buildings like Penn Station and the glorious mansions of the Gilded Age to

Overview

Like a parallel universe, an entire city could be formed with the lost buildings of New York Citys past. Lost New York is a walk through this virtual metropolis. More than an architectural tour, it is a fascinating view of the citys ever-changing landscape and way of life, from magnificent buildings like Penn Station and the glorious mansions of the Gilded Age to trolleys, diners, racetracks and baseball parks that now exist only in photographs. Filled with intriguing photographs on every page, the book illustrates both the citys distant and recent past, from the mid-nineteenth century through the first decade of the twenty-first. It follows a chronology of constant change, charting the years when the major features of the city were destroyed, altered or abandoned. Forests of tall-masted ships, horse-drawn carriages and massive train terminals gave way to cars and trucks. Dazzling amusement parks and luxurious resorts in Coney Island, the great Worlds Fair of 1939, rock n roll palaces, and many romantic features of Central Park are now only memories. Buildings that have become icons of the New York cityscape hide an earlier history, like that of the first Waldorf-Astoria, the worlds largest and most opulent hotel that once stood on the site of the Empire State Building. These lost places are interwoven with engrossing stories of the multi-millionaires, robber barons, artists, engineers and entrepreneurs who shaped New York. They are a record of historic events, of disasters like the sinking of the Normandie at a Manhattan pier, and the world-shaking tragedy of the World Trade Center. The dynamic forces that created New York left a trail of memorable yet neglected history as amazing as the city today. Rediscover it in Lost New York. Author Information Marcia Reiss is the author of seven books about New York history and architecture including the best-selling New York Then and Now. Her most recent works include New York City at Night and Central Park Then and Now, as well as a series of guides to historic Brooklyn neighbourhoods. She was Policy Director of the Parks Council, now New Yorkers for Parks, and previousy Public Affairs Director for the New York City Department of Ports and Trade. She also taught at Columbia University and Hunter College, and was a reporter for the Brooklyn Phoenix and the Seafarer's Log. She and her husband have lived in several buildings in Manhattan and Brooklyn as old as the ones in Lost New York. Fortunately, non are lost. They now live in an 1840s farmhouse in upstate New York.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In her latest, journalist and historian Reiss (New York Now and Then) leads us through New York’s vanished architectural heritage. From the first Metropolitan Museum of Art, engulfed by additions in 1895, to SoHo’s Moondance Diner, trucked to Wyoming in 2007, the book’s catalogue of disappeared landmarks evokes an alternate reality in which elaborate gothic mansions, elevated train tracks, floating bathhouses, first generation skyscrapers, and copious pleasure gardens dotted the city’s grid. Pithy, though sometimes elliptical, summaries of genesis and destruction accompany astounding black-and-white photographs of New York’s illustrious past, including the opulent interiors of Vanderbilt mansions and Coney Island’s generations of pleasure-seekers. The cumulative effect of these images is less a sense of loss than the recognition of the fluidity of fortune. Monuments to the robber barons and extinct newspapers of yesterday are demolished or transformed into the hospitals, hotels, office buildings, and apartment complexes of tomorrow. Reiss shows that change is not itself a bad thing, though some “improvements”—like the dismantling of the old Penn Station in 1966 for the monolithic Madison Square Garden—display the shortsightedness that can afflict any era. Although the book could use a general introduction and conclusion to frame the entries, the pictures alone are worth the price of admission. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"The pictures alone are worth the price of admission." —Publishers Weekly

"As a native New Yorker, I can wax poetic about a long list of favorite haunts that have disappeared from the island . . . All these iconic images are retained in glorious black and white." —DowntownMagazineNYC.com  

"[Lost New York] is beautifully illustrated in aged black-and-white photos and burnished with charming prose based on many years of research." —Library Journal

"History buff or NYC lover — or both — make sure you add this book to your library ASAP!"  —DoobyBrain

"A gorgeous, photo-studded work that sheds light on various sites throughout New York that have since been adandoned or demolished. . . . The book also contains some sizzling salacious details on New York history."  —LibraryJournal.com

"...gorgeous."  —LibraryJournal.com

Library Journal
Reiss, who has published seven books on the city's history and architecture (e.g., New York Then and Now), accurately depicts and valuably describes in two-page spreads 75 of the most memorable buildings of old Manhattan, mostly dating from the Civil War to World War II (with a few Coney Island landmarks thrown in). The book is beautifully illustrated in aged black-and-white photos and burnished with charming prose based on many years of research. This book is briefer than the three comparable volumes of Robert A.M. Stern's four-volume series (New York 1880, New York 1900, New York 1930) and offers an alternative view to Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's The Landmarks of New York, which just appeared in its fifth edition; the latter volume covers surviving buildings, whereas Reiss's title recollects demolished buildings, including Pennsylvania Station, New York's greatest architectural loss. VERDICT A good choice for enthusiasts of northeastern or urban architecture and for fond collectors of public memories.—Peter Kaufman, formerly with Boston Architectural Coll.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781909815230
Publisher:
Pavilion Books, Limited
Publication date:
11/28/2013
Series:
Lost
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
300
File size:
26 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Marcia Reiss is the author of Central Park Then and Now (2010); New York Then and Now (2005); Manhattan in Photographs (2005); Architectural Details (2004); Architecture in Detail: New York (2003); Brooklyn Then and Now (2002); and a series of guides to historic Brooklyn neighborhoods for the Brooklyn Historical Society. She was Policy Director of the Parks Council, now New Yorkers for Parks, and previously Public Affairs Director for the New York City Department of Ports and Trade. She also taught at Columbia University and Hunter College, and was a reporter for the Brooklyn Phoenix. She and her husband are former residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan and now live in upstate New York.

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Lost New York 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I want Cheyenne die
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great book about places in New York that have been destroyed. You are reliving the past. The pictures are amazing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The black and white photographs are amazing and it has an imformative narration. I enjoyed looking back at what used to be in New York City and glad the author preserved it for us.