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Lost Sloth
     

Lost Sloth

by J. Otto Seibold
 

Sloth's phone rings and rings. He races across the room to answer the call, but he's a sloth, so it takes a while. The phone says he's won an afternoon shopping spree! Can the sloth get to the store in time to claim his prize? Yes, but it's going to take an impromptu zipline, a missed bus, a parkful of trees, an oblivious ice-cream vendor, a rainbow hang glider,

Overview

Sloth's phone rings and rings. He races across the room to answer the call, but he's a sloth, so it takes a while. The phone says he's won an afternoon shopping spree! Can the sloth get to the store in time to claim his prize? Yes, but it's going to take an impromptu zipline, a missed bus, a parkful of trees, an oblivious ice-cream vendor, a rainbow hang glider, and an out-of-control shopping cart to make it happen. As soon as the spree begins, the sloth crashes into a pillow display and falls asleep, exhausted from excitement. When he awakes, he finds himself the proud and happy owner of
several fine new pillows. Mission accomplished.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Dozing in an armchair with a three-string guitar in his lap, Sloth hears the phone ring and drags himself across the carpet to answer it. “Hurry, Sloth!” urges the narrator. Sloth learns that he is the winner of a shopping spree, and he has “only three hours to claim his prize” from a distant store. Although Sloth is not sure what “spree” means, he hastens outdoors, misses the bus, and falls asleep on a shortcut through a tree-lined city park (where an Occupy encampment provides a contemporary touch). Seibold (Olive, the Other Reindeer) introduces a quirky protagonist whose innate sluggishness is at odds with frenzied consumer culture. The digital illustrations—in carnival colors of bubblegum pink, white, and tropical blues and greens—have all the asymmetrical charm of Seibold’s earlier work. Sloth’s lethargy provides humor and suspense, but Seibold goes for the easy win when a hang-glider materializes, enabling Sloth to claim a prize that’s ideally suited to his sedate, unhurried lifestyle. Although the story’s ending disappoints, Sloth is a likably absurd character. Ages 4–up. (June)
From the Publisher
"Inventive and contemporary" —The New York Times

“A free shopping spree turns into a race against time—never a happy idea when you’re a sloth.
Too logy even to get to the phone before the answering machine kicks in, Sloth learns that he has only eight hours to claim his spree at the store. Can he make it? Being narcoleptic as well as slow-moving, his ensuing odyssey quickly turns hilariously suspenseful as Seibold urges readers to form a cheering section with lines printed in a different color—'Yay, Sloth! Let’s go, Sloth!' In the characteristically stylized illustrations, Sloth’s frozen, masklike features add a Buster Keaton–ish air to his frantic efforts. Having dragged his way down the street and into the park, where a hoped-for shortcut becomes a long detour/nap, Sloth arrives in the nick of time on a stolen hang glider. His spree turns out to be short but sweet, as he immediately rams his cart into a pile of pillows and passes out. The author cranks tongue further into cheek with witty side business, like a glimpse of an Occupy! camp in the park and, at the end, a one-person pillow fight ('Yay, Sloth! You won!').
Another clever, quirky outing.”—Kirkus

"Seibold's distinctive stylized illustrations and oddball main character should win over even the sleepiest readers." —San Francisco Chronicle

“The book is a delight, graced by Seibold’s brightly colored and whimsical style...” -John McMurtrie, San Francisco Chronicle

"J. Otto Seibold cleverly posits the sloth's sluggishness alongside American consumerism, rendering it the kind of book parents will actually enjoy unpacking with their children night after night." —SF Weekly

"Three hours may sound like plenty of time to you and me, but to a sloth, three hours is, like, a nanosecond. Oh, noes! How on earth is a creature that movies 5.1 to 15 feet per minute supposed to make it all the way across town to the Shopping Spree Store? And what will Sloth buy when he gets there? The answer is both surprising and ironic — just like the demographic audience for this book."—Denver Post

"The digital illustrations—in carnival colors of bubblegum pink, white, and tropical blues and greens—have all the asymmetrical charm of Seibold’s earlier work." —Publishers Weekly

"The cover makes Lost Sloth look like a moody, street-art saavy book but the inside is a lot more like the boardgame Candy Land -from the saturated vector art swinging along sugar-tone streets to the hyperactive luck-of-the-draw plot contortions." -Quimby's

"Kind of googly-goggly." —Rachel, age 7

“J. Otto Seibold latest kiddie story is irrepressibly energized with eye-popping colors, glossy spreads, and intricately detailed patterns and shapes on every page.” —Smithsonian BookDragon

“Extraordinary beautiful [...] colorful, angular, pop-y, and very accessible, with loads of detail to pore over.” —Boing Boing

School Library Journal
09/01/2013
PreK-Gr 1—Sloth moves very slowly so when the phone rings, he misses the call. The voice mail tells him that he has won a shopping spree at a nearby store and needs to be there by three. The critter is intrigued even though he doesn't have a clue as to what a "spree" is. Even though sloths aren't great at hurrying, he tries his mightiest to get there in time. He just misses the bus and falls asleep after he climbs a tree to travel through the park. He eventually gets to the store in spite of his limitations and accidentally lands in a pile of pillows that he gets to take home. What could be better for a sleepy sloth? Seibold's distinctive art adds to the silliness of the situations the protagonist finds himself in. Young children will chuckle over the ludicrous events that help the little creature get to the store on time. Pair this title with Eric Carle's "Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," said the Sloth (Philomel, 2002) to fill in the blanks on the somnolent nature of these animals.—Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
Kirkus Reviews
A free shopping spree turns into a race against time--never a happy idea when you're a sloth. Too logy even to get to the phone before the answering machine kicks in, Sloth learns that he has only eight hours to claim his spree at the store. Can he make it? Being narcoleptic as well as slow-moving, his ensuing odyssey quickly turns hilariously suspenseful as Seibold urges readers to form a cheering section with lines printed in a different color--"Yay, Sloth! Let's go, Sloth!" In the characteristically stylized illustrations, Sloth's frozen, masklike features add a Buster Keaton–ish air to his frantic efforts. Having dragged his way down the street and into the park, where a hoped-for shortcut becomes a long detour/nap, Sloth arrives in the nick of time on a stolen hang glider. His spree turns out to be short but sweet, as he immediately rams his cart into a pile of pillows and passes out. The author cranks tongue further into cheek with witty side business, like a glimpse of an Occupy! camp in the park and, at the end, a one-person pillow fight ("Yay, Sloth! You won!"). Another clever, quirky outing. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781938073359
Publisher:
McSweeney's Publishing
Publication date:
06/11/2013
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
503,354
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

J. Otto Seibold is a self-taught artist from Oakland, California, best known as the author and illustrator of many renowned children’s books, among them Olive, the Other Reindeer (with Vivian Walsh). His work has been exhibited and published widely. Lost Sloth marks his twentieth anniversary in children’s books.

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