The Lost Testament

( 3 )

Overview

After a public scandal leaves his personal life and ministry in ruins, Darrion James makes plans to start over elsewhere. On a train ride south, he meets a quirky Jewish writer who hands him a notebook with a controversial origin. . . Finding himself drawn to the writings, which he calls The Lost Testament, he spearheads a fiery, spiritual revival in the segregated mountain town of his youth - much to the chagrin of Ku Klux Klansman Geary Johnson. Meanwhile, Jack Miles Everham and his wife Betty Lou are desperate...
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Overview

After a public scandal leaves his personal life and ministry in ruins, Darrion James makes plans to start over elsewhere. On a train ride south, he meets a quirky Jewish writer who hands him a notebook with a controversial origin. . . Finding himself drawn to the writings, which he calls The Lost Testament, he spearheads a fiery, spiritual revival in the segregated mountain town of his youth - much to the chagrin of Ku Klux Klansman Geary Johnson. Meanwhile, Jack Miles Everham and his wife Betty Lou are desperate to escape their loveless marriage and prostitute Charlie Evans and her Creole friend, Jos├ęphine Courtier, do whatever they can to survive. All cross paths with Darrion, resulting in life-altering, violent, and even deadly consequences. Taking place over fourteen months, The Lost Testament combines engaging characters and fast-paced events inspired by the 1906 Asuza Street Revival to teach powerful lessons of faith, humanity, healing, and restoration.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780578055497
  • Publisher: Great Nation Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/23/2010
  • Pages: 266
  • Product dimensions: 0.56 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 5.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Brian Thompson’s The Lost Testament is strongest in those

    Brian Thompson’s The Lost Testament is strongest in those places where it depicts racial tensions in the 1960s in the South, and weakest where it uses the mysterious Lost Testament to drive the story. The large cast of characters can leave the reader feeling disconnected from the tale, but the characters all have their own agendas, which, by later chapters, do finally intersect.

    The depiction of worship with full sermons, singing and people falling down is powerfully evocative, as is the story of a cross-burning and lynching. Wounded characters, of all shades of background, faith and skin, struggle to pick up the pieces of their lives. And the author places Christian belief, fortune telling and visions all together in the mix, waiting for faith to win through.

    The story certainly speeds up as the protagonist’s church and the Klan both gather followers. A final scene is as surprising as it is enticing. But the curious Lost Testament’s power remains mostly implied, uncontested, and oddly disconnected from the tale that bears its name.

    Disclosure: I bought a free ecopy of this book when it was on sale.

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  • Posted August 2, 2011

    The Old South wasn't always so Charming and Polite

    The Lost Testament by Brian L. Thompson is twenty-six chapters of action-packed faith and inspirational suspense released in September 2010 by the author through Smashwords. The beautiful novel is available in both paperback and eBook formats. Vivid description, history, and culture come alive as characters jump off the page and illustrate the real South during this period of history. Darrion James attempts to start over after his reputation is ruined and he's divorced. The author provides discussion questions at the end. I found The Lost Testament easy to get into with a quick start and fast pace, and I wanted to keep reading until I found out what happened. A reader will journey with Darrion through trials, tribulation, heartache, pain, love, loss, fear, and faith that overcomes. The characters realistically illustrate how the South wasn't always so charming and polite. Troubles united some and faith brought them together through an educated preacher who could talk country when the need arose. His y'all and sermons held a rapt audience that grew until the old foothold of the South erupted in violence.
    Mr. Thompson asks his readers if they would have ended the novel differently. Yes, this one would have. I found it ended too abruptly, and I didn't buy the ending, but I feel this novel has great potential and is otherwise well researched and well crafted.

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  • Posted July 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Coming to the Light

    Needing to put some distance between himself and his ex wife, Darrion James set out to get away. Due to unforeseen circumstances, he ended up in his childhood hometown longer than expected. With his mother's urging, he's called back to what he's good at doing. His beliefs and preachings opened eyes and turned lives around. Not everybody was happy to have him around.

    When I first started reading "The Lost Testament" by Brian L Thompson, I thought it was going to be uninteresting and boring. It started out a little slow but picked up. The characters were all full of life, each being driven by their own personal vendettas. You will experience a mixed array of emotions and the ending will definitely be a surprise.

    Reviewed by: Jas

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