The Lost Throne

( 34 )

Overview

The Lost Throne reigns supreme...

A reclusive monastery is the scene of a brutal slaughter that sends Richard Byrd on a worldwide race to find a magnificent treasure. But there are those who will stop at nothing to prevent its discovery.

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Overview

The Lost Throne reigns supreme...

A reclusive monastery is the scene of a brutal slaughter that sends Richard Byrd on a worldwide race to find a magnificent treasure. But there are those who will stop at nothing to prevent its discovery.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

When the bodies of seven headless monks are found on the rocks below a Greek mountain monastery, Nick Dial, head of Interpol's homicide division, investigates in Kuzneski's fourth novel to feature ex-Special Forces warriors Jonathon Payne and David Jones (after Sword of God). Meanwhile, Payne and Jones are in St. Petersburg, Fla., when Payne receives a phone call from a frightened American woman, Allison Taylor, in St. Petersburg, Russia, who says her boss, a wealthy antiquities researcher, has just been shot dead there. Payne flies to Russia to rescue Allison. Both of these plots eventually join as all involved head off to find a mysterious lost artifact, now known to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Despite the silly, juvenile banter between Payne and Jones as they go about the business of killing bad guys and the book's weak denouement, readers will find the Greek setting a refreshing change after the usual Rome and Jerusalem venues of many such religious thrillers. (Aug.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Kirkus Reviews
Well-plotted thriller turns on ancient secrets, savvy sleuths and other matters to do Indiana Jones proud. There's a hidden treasure to rival Solon's here, plus extremely bad guys, and good guys who don't play by the rules. The whole saga is set against a little-explored backdrop: mountainous northeastern Greece, home to devout monks who are very good at keeping secrets and very bad at defending themselves. Kuzneski (Sword of God, 2007, etc.) opens on an ominously antiquarian note. "The greatest secret of Ancient Greece was silenced by a death in Italy"-a death in Naples on Christmas Day 1890, to be exact, and portending "fire, deception, and ancient gold." Portent reigns throughout, sometimes ham-fistedly. As we careen into the present, we find a blade-bearing evildoer and his henchmen inside the sanctuary of an Orthodox monastery, to an unhappy effect for the monk on deck: "He punctuated his statement with a flick of his sword, separating the monk from his head . . . Head on the left. Body on the right. Blood everywhere." Enter the Americans in the form of Delta Force types known as MANIACS ("the top soldiers from the Marines, Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard"). So what's Uncle Sam doing mixing it up with bearded heretics halfway across the world, to say nothing of the long-suffering Greek cops in charge of cracking the case? Could be it has something to do with clerics flying under false colors, or unfinished Cold War business, or the clash of civilizations, but it wouldn't be sporting to say. Kuzneski steers his narrative through enough satisfying twists and turns to resemble a Mediterranean goat path until the mystery is revealed and the killers of "ten monks, three cops, and afucking mule" and chastened. Good for late summer at the beach. Agent: Scott Miller/Trident Media Group
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425235393
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 7/6/2010
  • Series: Payne and Jones Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 560
  • Sales rank: 306,830
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Chris Kuzneski
Chris Kuzneski is the international bestselling author of The Lost Throne, Sword of God, Sign of the Cross, and The Plantation. His thrillers have been published in more than twenty languages and are sold in more than forty countries. Kuzneski, who grew up in Pennsylvania, now lives on the Gulf Coast of Florida.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    WINDERFUL BOOK!

    Great read, with action, history, mystery, excitement. It's a step back in ancient times and murder. Icould read this book again.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Great Adventure.. Indiana Jones Genre..

    I'm going to read some more from this fine author... great yarn!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An alternate perspective

    After reading rave reviews comparing Kuzneski's book to Rollins and the best of Dan Brown - I bought the book. The plot was predictable, the writing was immature, and the characters were one dimensional. I waded through the whole thing; found the ending contrived, and foolish. Save your money; if you must read this - wait for the paperback, or borrow it from someone.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2009

    Excellent -- Fun Read

    This was Chris Kuzneski's best book thus far. He writes very much like a mixture of Steve Berry, James Rollins, an earlier (and far-better Clive Cussler), and Dan Brown (Angels and Demons/DiVinci Code -- not Lost Symbol). The book has a series of actions that are occurring in various parts of Europe each related to finding a lost artifact. The story moves along very well, it has a good mixture of historical information, and the characters are three-dimensional and at times, humorous.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 24, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    WOW

    This is probably one of the best books, I have read in a long time. From the first page to the last it is an excellent read. I loved the plot and the characters were wonderful. I did like that you didn't have to read all books, to understand the characters, you were able to read them out of order and not play catch up. So sit back, get comfortable and enjoy the ride.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Review: The Lost Throne by Chris Kuzneski

    The Lost Throne brings us the third adventure of D.J. Jones and Jonathan Payne. This time they receive a call from a distressed woman in St. Petersburg, Russia. Her employer was just gunned down in front of her and she needs help. They set out immediately to rescue her. Once in Russia, they investigate the death of her employer only to find themselves on a treasure hunt.

    The trail leads them to Mt. Athos, Greece. They run into an old acquaintance, Nick Dial, who has been investigating the murders of a group of monks for Interpol. Their quests are intertwined and they are forced to work together. Can Jones and Payne discover one of the original seven wonders of the world?

    This book is a very fast thriller. The story is told via the action and words of the characters. Don't expect detailed descriptions or unnecessary prose. This story moves fast, but I had no problem visualizing everything that was going on. Chris Kuzneski is able to tell a vivid story without getting bogged down.

    I really enjoyed the story. Critics may be put off by the lack of explanation or detailed research included with the story. But, this isn't that kind of book. This book is about action and adventure in foreign lands. If you like fast paced thrillers, you will love this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Par for the course!

    I have been a fan of Kuzneski since 'The Plantation'. The writing style flows very well and it is a quick read. Characters are easily identifyable and there is a drive to complete it. He takes you to the edge of the cliff and leaves you there. Fast plot...high action...worth a read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    OK but not great

    I feel like the author took too long bringing 2 different story lines together. It's only in the last 90 pages that an exciting treasure hunt gets underway. The first 399 pages are OK but not much more than international covert operations where the characters are trite and predictable. I probably won't read his other works. I do have to say , however, the last 90 pages are truly exciting and are the treasure-seeking thriller I was after.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Lived up to all the reviews I have read

    This was the first book by Chris Kuzneski I have ever read. After reading this I have added Kuzneski to the list of my go to authors.. Could not put the book down. Thanks for the wonderful read.

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    Posted April 14, 2011

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    Posted May 20, 2011

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    Posted September 9, 2011

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    Posted March 8, 2011

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    Posted January 25, 2010

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    Posted October 16, 2010

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