The Lost Warship

The Lost Warship

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by John Kilgallon, Robert Moore Williams, J. Allen St. John
     
 
The Lost Warship, by Robert Moore Williams. "Japanese bombs rained down, there was a tremendous blast--and a weird thing happened to the Idaho....." This 26,000 word novella, from Amazing Stories, January 1943, is a rousing science fiction adventure tale! The American Battleship, USS Idaho, disappears in the middle of World War II and finds an island of savages and

Overview

The Lost Warship, by Robert Moore Williams. "Japanese bombs rained down, there was a tremendous blast--and a weird thing happened to the Idaho....." This 26,000 word novella, from Amazing Stories, January 1943, is a rousing science fiction adventure tale! The American Battleship, USS Idaho, disappears in the middle of World War II and finds an island of savages and dinosaurs! Only the savages aren't quite as backward as one would believe.....

Robert Moore Williams (1907—1977), born in Farmington, Missouri, was an American writer, primarily of science fiction. He has over 150 short stories to his credit, published in the popular science fiction magazines spanning the period 1937 to 1966. His first published story was Zero as a Limit, which appeared in Astounding Science Fiction in 1937, under the pseudonym of "Robert Moore". He also wrote as: E. K. Jarvis, Russell Storm, John S. Browning, and H. H. Harmon.

With many novels and essays to his credit, he penned the “Zanthar” series of four novels over the 1967-69 time period. His "Jongor" series was originally published in Fantastic Adventures in the 1940s and 1950s, but only appeared in book form in 1970. He was a prolific author throughout his career, with his last novel appearing in 1972.

This story by Williams, “The Lost Warship” was originally published in Amazing Stories magazine in January 1943 with the cover painting and interior illustrations credited to J. Allen St. John.

--John

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012323613
Publisher:
Thunderbidz Book and Hobby
Publication date:
03/15/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
782 KB

Meet the Author

Robert Moore Williams (1907—1977), born in Farmington, Missouri, was an American writer, primarily of science fiction. He has over 150 short stories to his credit, published in the popular science fiction magazines spanning the period 1937 to 1966. His first published story was Zero as a Limit, which appeared in Astounding Science Fiction in 1937, under the pseudonym of "Robert Moore". He also wrote as: E. K. Jarvis, Russell Storm, John S. Browning, and H. H. Harmon.

With many novels and essays to his credit, he penned the “Zanthar” series of four novels over the 1967-69 time period. His "Jongor" series was originally published in Fantastic Adventures in the 1940s and 1950s, but only appeared in book form in 1970. He was a prolific author throughout his career, with his last novel appearing in 1972.

This story by Williams, “The Lost Warship” was originally published in Amazing Stories magazine in January 1943 with the cover painting and interior illustrations credited to J. Allen St. John.

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Lost Warship 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
cray74 More than 1 year ago
The story itself was fine, a quick read taken from the 1943 Amazing science fiction magazine. Battleship Idaho is thrown through a space-time crevice to the Dawn of Time and must deal with dinosaurs, Atlanteans, and a traitorous passenger. The story alone I'd give 3 stars; it is fine pulp science fiction, though I would've liked to have seen some more big gun fun from the Idaho. The reason I'm giving this ebook offering 1 star is because you can get this story for free on Project Gutenberg. I stumbled over that while trying to look up some background details of the story about 2 hours after paying for it.. Project Gutenberg publishes (for free) ebooks of out-of-copyright books, keeping them in circulation for posterity. While it was probably legal to resell here since The Lost WarShip is outside its copyright, charging $2.50 for a free book is disingenuous.