Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson

Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson

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by Rachel Carson
     
 

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When Rachel Carson died of cancer in 1964, her four books, including the environmental classic Silent Spring, had made her one of the most famous people in America. This trove of previously uncollected writings is a priceless addition to our knowledge of Rachel Carson, her affinity with the natural world, and her life.See more details below

Overview

When Rachel Carson died of cancer in 1964, her four books, including the environmental classic Silent Spring, had made her one of the most famous people in America. This trove of previously uncollected writings is a priceless addition to our knowledge of Rachel Carson, her affinity with the natural world, and her life.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Lyric, descriptive, informative, and moving.—Bill Sharp, The New York Times Book Review

"[Lost Woods] gives a new generation an opportunity to rediscover the legendary biologist and ecologist. . . . These writings-essays, letters, magazine pieces, speeches-show us the evolution of a decent woman from scholar to warrior for all that's right."—Carolyn See, The Washington Post

"This wonderful new book allows us to discover and learn anew from the scientist who taught ecology to the world."
-San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle

"Lear unveils in Carson's own words how she developed as a scientist and a writer, uniting science and literature to create works that still resonate today."—Elizabeth Abbott, Toronto Globe and Mail

"What comes across most profoundly here is Carson's innate understanding-spiritual as much as scientific-of the connectedness of all living things, and her ability to describe complicated concepts in phrases that sing. . . . Read this book."—Bruce Mirken, Pacific Sun

School Library Journal
YA-These brief excerpts from previously unpublished or uncollected writings provide YAs with samples of some of the most lyrical, clear scientific writing available in the fields of biology, ecology, and wildlife and wilderness conservation. A number of the excerpts included are from speeches Carson made before groups such as the Women's National Press Club. Each selection, whether letter, speech, or article, is preceded by a brief introduction that gives useful background information. The naturalist's struggle for financial security, her devotion to her work, and her fascination with the natural world are revealed both in her writing and in the editor's introductions. Lear also provides updates to Carson's writing where necessary, since much of this work was produced in the 1950s. Carson's call for wildlife conservation and preservation, her warnings about the dangers of pesticides, and about the need to preserve and protect our natural resources, however, are timeless.-Molly Connally, Kings Park Library, Fairfax County, VA
Booknews
Provides a sense of Silent Spring (1962) author Rachel Carson's evolution as a writer and thinker through a presentation of some of her less-known writings including field notebook entries, letters, magazine articles, and a television script. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Ann H. Zwinger
These resplendent essays, speeches,and responses show Rachel Carson's mind at its most cogent and creative. The charm and erudition of Lear's introductions are fitting companions to her marvelous selections of Carson's work. Lost Woods adds immeasurably to my understanding of the nature writer whose book I most admire. -- Author of The Mysterious Lands
Bill Sharp
....Linda Lear's collection of her essays does a superb job of pulling from Carson's works a collection that is lyric, descriptive, informative and moving. -- The New York Times Book Review
Kirkus Reviews
Biographer Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) knits together here a number of Rachel Carson's writings' often much more personal, quirky, and searching than her celebrated books—-that add meat to her body of literary/scientific writing. Carson published just four books during her lifetime, but she also cranked out speeches and articles and newspaper work, kept copious field notes, and wrote thousands of letters. Lear has selected from this material a chronological sampling as a guide to Carson's evolution as a writer and a natural scientist. Many of the pieces will be new to most readers, even if their tone—-of "awakening an emotional response to nature" is trademark Carson. This collection includes pieces on Carson the hard-core birder: there are both field jottings and essays on chimney swifts and warblers and gulls, and a rapt couple of days on a hawk watch in Pennsylvania. She wrote liner notes to Debussy's La Mer, music which she comfortably interprets to jibe with her notion of the ocean's mysteries. She was certainly one of the first to give the importance of island biogeography more than a passing nod; an essay on the destruction of rare island habitats, and the extinction of island species, has been included by Lear. And her anxiety over atomic weapons, especially when byproducts are dumped in the oceans, is spelled out here in her preface to the second edition of The Sea Around Us. As always, touching all aspects of her work are her puzzlings over the simple fact of life and her druidic appreciation of natural cycles and the beauty, excitement, and inscrutable elements of the natural world.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807085479
Publisher:
Beacon
Publication date:
11/28/1998
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
740,217
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
1300L (what's this?)

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