Lost Worlds

Overview

An artist, poet, and prolific contributor to Weird Tales, Clark Ashton Smith (1893–1967) is an influential figure in the history of pulp fiction. A close correspondent and collaborator with H. P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, Smith was widely celebrated as a master by his contemporaries. Back in print for the first time since 1971, Lost Worlds brings together twenty-three of Smith's classic stories, all of which were originally published in Weird Tales. Rather than center his works on heroes, Smith created ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $40.99   
  • New (2) from $56.87   
  • Used (1) from $40.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$56.87
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(821)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

An artist, poet, and prolific contributor to Weird Tales, Clark Ashton Smith (1893–1967) is an influential figure in the history of pulp fiction. A close correspondent and collaborator with H. P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, Smith was widely celebrated as a master by his contemporaries. Back in print for the first time since 1971, Lost Worlds brings together twenty-three of Smith's classic stories, all of which were originally published in Weird Tales. Rather than center his works on heroes, Smith created fantastical worlds around which he built cycles of stories. Included here are tales from the realms of Averoigne, Zothique, Hyperborea, and others. Told in lush poetic prose, these haunting stories bring to life dark, dreamlike realms full of gothic monsters and mortals. Jeff VanderMeer provides an introduction for this Bison Books edition.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Both volumes sport collections of Smith's shorts, which first appeared in Weird Tales and other defunct pulps. They're a combination of sf, horror, and some fantasy. Smith was a big name in his day, so try these if this type of material moves in your collection. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803293519
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2006
  • Series: Bison Frontiers of Imagination Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 426
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeff VanderMeer is a two-time World Fantasy Award winner whose books of fiction and edited anthologies have been finalists for the Philip K. Dick Award and the International Horror Guild Award.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt



Lost Worlds



By Clark Ashton Smith


University of Nebraska Press


Copyright © 2006

University of Nebraska Press

All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-8032-9351-8



Introduction


Jeff VanderMeer

I've had a love-hate relationship with Clark Ashton Smith's
work for as long as I can remember. His beautiful visions of other
worlds and other places linger in my memory but so do the hyper-elevated
prose style, the grimly formal dialog, and the sometimes
stiff, ritualistic scenes. In rereading Lost Worlds, however, I'm
struck by how little these latter tendencies interfere with my
enjoyment of many of the stories. Smith's fiction does not always
succeed-nor am I convinced that Smith's aesthetic is the result
of conscious intent-but the attempt makes for interesting
writing. Some of these tales have only historical significance now,
but many others still hold great imagistic power.

Lost Worlds gathers Clark Ashton Smith's "lost world" stories,
set in places as diverse as Hyperborea, Atlantis, Zothique, and
Averoigne. The collection immerses the reader with a sensibility
that is foreign but also familiar. Readers will recognize these
settings from the works of other pulp writers and Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle, as well as countless movies, although Smith has a
somewhat different take on the subject matter. Unlike most other
approaches to lost worlds, Smith's fiction eschews the framing
structure in whichmodern-day people discover a "lost" place.
Instead, there is no outside world at all, and for this reason these
tales might be classified as "secondary world" in nature.

Smith treats his settings as vibrant, living locales populated
by picturesque, oddly ritualistic characters. The descriptions in
these stories are more useful than those in the tales Smith sets
in the real world-their intensity does not seem as out of place,
and their length seems appropriate to describe milieus whose
existence depends so much on the stuff of myth and rumor.

"The Tale of Satampra Zeiros" exemplifies this approach.
Like many of the Lost Worlds stories, it is told almost entirely
in summary with a few attempts at half-scene. As the narrator
embarks on his quest, the layering of description seems
excessive. The reader waits for the story to begin ... then starts
to understand that the description is the story. This method is not
necessarily a bad thing, but it is unusual. It works for Smith due
to his pseudo-poetic stylings:

There were no birds nor animals, such as one would think to find
in any wholesome forest; but at rare intervals a stealthy viper with
pale and heavy coils glided away from our feet among the rank
leaves of the roadside, or some enormous moth with baroque
and evil-colored mottlings flew before us and disappeared into
the dimness of the jungle. Abroad already in the half-light, huge
purpureal bats with eyes like tiny rubies arose at our approach
from the poisonous-looking fruits on which they feasted, and
watched us with malign intention as they hovered noiselessly in
the air above.

Some may note the carelessness of the vague "evil-colored,"
among other examples, but on the whole the intensity of such
prose serves Smith well. The reader has little choice but to
believe in the world described, even if the reader may not always
believe in the story being told. Less lush prose would cause
the descriptions to crumble, leaving the reader with the banal
rendered in turgid summary.

(Continues...)





Excerpted from Lost Worlds
by Clark Ashton Smith
Copyright © 2006 by University of Nebraska Press .
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)