Lotus in the Wild

( 9 )

Overview

Six months after freeing his slave Roman and his thrall Aron, Wulfgar finds himself bored with the choices of bed partners in his lands. Thus while on a twice-yearly trip to Londinium to replenish supplies, Wulfgar visits the local slave auction in hopes of finding something to pique his interest. His eye is caught by Kintaro, a beautiful, feminine slave boy from the Far East.

Enthralled, Wulfgar doesn’t care how much Kintaro costs; he’s got to have him. But Kintaro is a very ...

See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

Six months after freeing his slave Roman and his thrall Aron, Wulfgar finds himself bored with the choices of bed partners in his lands. Thus while on a twice-yearly trip to Londinium to replenish supplies, Wulfgar visits the local slave auction in hopes of finding something to pique his interest. His eye is caught by Kintaro, a beautiful, feminine slave boy from the Far East.

Enthralled, Wulfgar doesn’t care how much Kintaro costs; he’s got to have him. But Kintaro is a very different sort of slave from Roman. He loves his duties, is proud of his skills, and as the former prized slave of an official of his homeland, is used to being spoiled and pampered in return for his efforts.

Though oblivious to matters of the heart, Wulfgar is enamored of Kintaro, but his son Gaeric is furious that this new slave feeds his father’s unnatural desires. Wulfgar’s passion, Kintaro’s pride, and Gaeric’s temper will clash as a ritual from the past and a dream of the future come to fruition… and Wulfgar’s heart is finally fulfilled.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781615812233
  • Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2010
  • Pages: 276
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 22, 2010

    Don't Miss This Read

    Originally posted at: www.whippedcream2.blogspot.com ***** Finding one's heart's desire is difficult at the best of times; finding it in someone who is your opposite in every way except sexual drive poses extra challenges.

    For everyone who was concerned about Wulgar's happiness at the end of Bee Among the Clover, this sequel is welcome and necessary. While we have the classic rough-hewn Alpha paired with a beautiful submissive half his size, a pairing so familiar in M/M fiction, the reader is given so much more than the usual. This is a tale of reaching across vast cultural divides, of adaptation and compromise, and of a determined love that refuses to bend to societal expectations.

    The historical aspects of the novel, as with the previous installment, are a large part of the novel's strengths. Wulfgar is everything a thane of his time should be: hard, fierce, demanding, generous with those who serve him well, and protective of what is his. While Norse/Germanic cultures at the time didn't exactly condone male/male relationships, they didn't necessarily censure them either. The shame in Norse culture was not in the act but in being the one who was taken. No free man would allow another male to use him willingly and the act of male rape was sometimes used to humiliate the conquered. With that said, a man of Wulgar's rank could certainly have male bed slaves if he chose, since it would be quite clear to everyone who was topping whom. That his only son doesn't approve is a different matter, part jealousy and part anger at seeing his father, as Gaeric sees it, manipulated by his slaves.

    Kintaro is one of the most charming characters I've ever come across. He's a whole person, so unlike most subs in m/m stories. Proud and often vain, he glories in who he is and what he's been trained to do. No simple sex slave, he has the body of a gymnast and a sharp mind, his training running parallel to a geisha's rather than a mere bed toy with all of the aesthetic qualities of grace and cultured skills one would expect. Though he has lived a privileged, spoiled life, and some of the misunderstandings he has with Wulfgar due to language barriers and cultural expectations become epic battles of wills, he truly does want to please his handsome thane and only wants the best for him. His efforts to adapt, to adjust to his new surroundings and still remain himself are wonderful to watch and he slowly unfolds to the reader as a young man of deep feeling and a compassionate heart much larger than his small frame.

    Because the immersion in history is so well done and because the struggle of cultural divide is so fascinating, I found myself disappointed in the ending. While I do understand that Wulfgar needs some closure and perhaps a little shove in the right direction, the way the ending is handled felt too contrived to me. Magical interference in a world full of very real dangers seemed unnecessary and a more believable resolution certainly should have been possible.

    With that said, the closing scene is lovely and I found the story as a whole more enjoyable than the previous one. With sympathy and an intuitive feel for the times, the authors have breathed life into two of the most memorable characters in historical fiction. What could have been clichéd portrayals have been painted instead as fully realized people, each with their own strengths and blind spots.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Wulfgar is not happy with the choices for bed partners he is fac

    Wulfgar is not happy with the choices for bed partners he is facing since he freed his slave Roman and his thrall Aron six months ago. Hoping to change that situation he visits the slave auction in Londinium when he goes to replenish his supplies during one of his twice yearly visits. When Wulfgar sets eyes on Kintaro he finds a slave he has to have no matter the cost.

    Kintaro is from the Far East and is very proud of his status of slave and greatly enjoys his duties as such. He is used to being pampered and spoiled for his efforts as he was the slave of an official in his homeland. Kintaro is different from any other slave that Wulfgar has ever had before.

    Life gets interesting when Kintaro’s pride, Wulfgar’s passion and Wulfgar’s son, Gaeric’s temper all collide. Wulfgar may not know much about matters of the heart but he knows that Kintaro is more to him than any other slave before Kintaro.



    This is wonderfully written story that is sure to please many readers. The characters are fun to read about and to see how they figure out the many obstacles that are standing in their way to finding happiness. The path that the characters take to find their happiness is very twisted as they have to work to figure out what they want and then how to get it. With misunderstanding to work through the reader gets emotionally invested in seeing the characters get their happy ever after. While the ending is a little abrupt the story is still very good and will have the reader eagerly turning the pages just to see what will happen next. This one can be read as a stand alone but is greatly enriched with reading it with the first story, Bee in the Clovers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)