Louder Now

Louder Now

4.5 23
by Taking Back Sunday
     
 

Depending on the level of aural assault you’re accustomed to, the title of Taking Back Sunday's major-label bow is either a promise or a threat. Either way, Louder Now delivers the goods, kicking up the decibels -- and the aggression -- without slipping into parody. The gauntlet is thrown down from the disc's first chords -- gnashing wails kick "What It FeelsSee more details below

Overview

Depending on the level of aural assault you’re accustomed to, the title of Taking Back Sunday's major-label bow is either a promise or a threat. Either way, Louder Now delivers the goods, kicking up the decibels -- and the aggression -- without slipping into parody. The gauntlet is thrown down from the disc's first chords -- gnashing wails kick "What It Feels Like to Be a Ghost" into gear -- and the pace lets up only for a quick breather. The Sundays are savvy enough to know that even the staunchest headbanger needs to rest the noggin, and those interludes -- like "Divine Intervention," which pairs layers of acoustic instrumentation with subtle electronic beats -- up the impact of the disc's more feral offerings. There's nothing subtle about adrenaline-drenched songs like "Liar (It Takes One to Know One)," on which singer Adam Lazzara sounds ready to step into the ring with every single person who's ever done him wrong. While the Long Islanders proved their ability to bounce between those extremes on past albums, Louder Now showcases a heretofore hidden knack for melding brute strength and artistic aspiration, particularly on the lurching "Twenty-Twenty Surgery." The sonic progression -- concurrent with songwriting that’s begun to focus on issues beyond girl trouble -- gives Louder Now a punch that's sneakier, and more likely a knockout, than anything Taking Back Sunday have delivered before.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Corey Apar
One has to hand it to Taking Back Sunday. Three albums in, they are now pretty much experts at re-creating their own sound, so much so that they can essentially make the same album repeatedly -- but you know, different -- yet still manage to rock hard enough underneath verbose lyrics that even those who notice the unabashed similarities to past releases just won't care. And yeah, obviously similar-sounding albums would be expected and somewhat desired from the same band. But really, it's quite obvious they take the "if it's not broke, don't fix it" motto straight to their emotive hearts. Since their debut Tell All Your Friends -- the album that broke TBS out as front-runners in the independent emo-rock scene of the early 2000s -- the band has managed to regurgitate their time-tested approach of layering multiple vocals spewing embittered lyrics over guitar-driven up-and-down dynamics on each subsequent release. Only by 2006, they've managed to influence so many upstarts along the way, their once-unique formula seems almost commonplace. With that being said, the band's songwriting has admittedly matured within that mold, honing their sound into one fit for arenas. Louder Now is an apt title for a super-tight, aggressive album that falls somewhere between their last two, tapping the heartfelt vigor of Tell All Your Friends in order to give Where You Want to Be a swift, square kick in the pants. "What's It Feel Like to Be a Ghost?" opens with terse riffing that soon surges with a composed feeling of frenzy over a thick, dirty bassline as Adam Lazzara declares "Are you up for, are you up for this?" Following suit, "Liar (It Takes One to Know One)" doesn't miss a beat, rocking out amid trademark, animated wordplay between Lazzara and guitarist Fred Mascherino. "Twenty-Twenty Surgery" simply soars with the richest vocals on the album, and "My Blue Heaven" (whose beginning vaguely resembles Third Eye Blind's "Wounded") brings in the strings for added effect. Louder Now benefits from Eric Valentine's clean production touch that isn't overly slick, giving the band plenty of breathing room to ponder, crunch, and explode at will with seamless elasticity. Taking Back Sunday is a prime example of a band not needing a drastic makeover every few years to remain relevant to their audience. However, even if Louder Now brings the mosh-pit fun ready to be embraced by new and old fans alike, an attempt to push themselves further would be more than welcomed. Regardless, the album seems like it could finally boost TBS to the My Chemical Romance-level of airwave domination -- so watch out.

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Product Details

Release Date:
04/25/2006
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624942429
catalogNumber:
49424

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Taking Back Sunday   Primary Artist
Elena Mascherino   Background Vocals
Anton Patzner   Violin,Viola
Lewis Patzner   Cello
Judgement Day   Strings

Technical Credits

Brian Gardner   Mastering
Eric Valentine   Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Tom Whalley   Executive Producer
Joel Meyerowitz   Cover Photo
Taking Back Sunday   Composer
Terry Dry   Management
Matt Radosevich   Engineer
Brad Filip   Artwork
Jillian Newman   Management
Anton Patzner   String Arrangements
Larry Weintraub   Management

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