Louise de la Valliere (The Three Musketeers, Volume V) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Louise de la Valliere is the middle section of The Vicomte de Bragelonne or, Ten Years After. Against a tender love story, Dumas continues the suspense which began with The Vicomte de Bragelonne and will end with The Man in the Iron Mask. It is early summer, 1661, and the royal court of France is in turmoil. Can it be true that the King is in love with the Duchess D'Orleans? Or has his eye been caught by the sweet and gentle Louise de la Valliere? No one is more anxious to know the answer than Raoul, son of ...
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Louise de la Valliere (The Three Musketeers, Volume V)

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Overview

Louise de la Valliere is the middle section of The Vicomte de Bragelonne or, Ten Years After. Against a tender love story, Dumas continues the suspense which began with The Vicomte de Bragelonne and will end with The Man in the Iron Mask. It is early summer, 1661, and the royal court of France is in turmoil. Can it be true that the King is in love with the Duchess D'Orleans? Or has his eye been caught by the sweet and gentle Louise de la Valliere? No one is more anxious to know the answer than Raoul, son of Athos, who loves Louise more than life itself. Behind the scenes, dark intrigues are afoot. Louis XIV is intent on making himself absolute master of France. Imminent crisis shakes the now ageing Musketeers and d'Artagnan out of their complacent retirement, but is the cause just?
Book Excerpt

During all these long and noisy debates between the opposite ambitions of politics and love, one of our characters, perhaps the one least deserving of neglect, was, however, very much neglected, very much forgotten, and exceedingly unhappy. In fact, D'Artagnan—D'Artagnan, we say, for we must call him by his name, to remind our readers of his existence—D'Artagnan, we repeat, had absolutely nothing whatever to do, amidst these brilliant butterflies of fashion. After following the king during two whole days at Fontainebleau, and critically observing the various pastoral fancies and heroi–comic transformations of his sovereign, the musketeer felt that he needed something more than this to satisfy the cravings of his nature. At every moment assailed by people asking him, "How do you think this costume suits me, Monsieur d'Artagnan?" he would reply to them in quiet, sarcastic tones, "Why, I think you are quite as well–dressed as the best–dressed monkey to be found in the fair at Saint–Laurent." It was just such a compliment D'Artagnan would choose where he did not feel disposed to pay any other: and, whether agreeable or not, the inquirer was obliged to be satisfied with it. Whenever any one asked him, "How do you intend to dress yourself this evening?" he replied, "I shall undress myself;" at which the ladies all laughed, and a few of them blushed. But after a couple of days passed in this manner, the musketeer, perceiving that nothing serious was likely to arise which would concern him, and that the king had completely, or, at least, appeared to have completely forgotten Paris, Saint–Mande, and Belle–Isle—that M. Colbert's mind was occupied with illuminations and fireworks—that for the next month, at least, the ladies had plenty of glances to bestow, and also to receive in exchange—D'Artagnan asked the king for leave of absence for a matter of private business. At the moment D'Artagnan made his request, his majesty was on the point of going to bed, quite exhausted from dancing.

"You wish to leave me, Monsieur d'Artagnan?" inquired the king, with an air of astonishment; for Louis XIV. could never understand why any one who had the distinguished honor of being near him could wish to leave him.

"Sire," said D'Artagnan, "I leave you simply because I am not of the slightest service to you in anything. Ah! if I could only hold the balancing–pole while you were dancing, it would be a very different affair."
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012125958
  • Publisher: MT Publishing Co.
  • Publication date: 11/30/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Alexandre Dumas, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (24 July 1802 – 5 December 1870)[1] was a French writer, best known for his historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. Many of his novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne were originally serialized. He also wrote plays and magazine articles and was a prolific correspondent.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

4 Star

(4)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 14, 2014

    Seriously abridged! I am quite disappointed to find the story o

    Seriously abridged! I am quite disappointed to find the story of the diamond bracelets is missing (though its discussion amongst courtiers afterwards is not), and the Jesuit father dying and leaving things to Aramis is also missing. Don't count on this for a complete version. I am going to see if the Oxford World's Classics version is available on Nook.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2007

    A continuing story, not standalone reading

    Musketeer fans will be disappointed if they are looking for the rollicking adventures of the quartet since their roles in this book are far more subtle--if not sinister in some cases. Still, the larger story is heavily influenced by the acts of these characters. True, the book does start slow but the story evolves into an enjoyable view on the intrigues of Louis XIV's court. The editors make the case that much of what some may view as 'boring' is really Dumas' attempt to highlight the changes taking place in France at the time chivalrous deeds and high adventure are replaced by intrigue and politics and the story reflects that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2007

    One of My Favorite Books

    This is a wonderful love story that tells us about the most famous French king Louis XIV and Louise de Lavalliere. I enjoyed reading about their love and court intrigues surrounding them. Dumas has an outstanding ablity to bring history to life. Nobody else was able to tell the story of the love affair that lead to the creation of the wonderful palace of Versailles. Also, we can follow our old friends here, who became older and wiser and still have their adventures. This book opens a different perspective on French history.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2004

    Im afraid your going to have to read it

    if you have found yourself following the musketeer's adventures,then you would be best to read this. Though it is alittle boring and slow at some points, your going to need to read it if your intending to read the man in the iron mask because they start to form its plot in this novel(i admit i found it tempting to skip over the really boring parts)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2004

    Some books were not meant for the screen

    I am happy to say that some books were never meant for the big screen. Dumas' trilogy has been a delight to read, though I admit his books are not meant for those who lack commitment to their literature or who would rather be dazzled for two hours by Hollywood. His books tell a wonderful story (though loosely tied to history)and should be read by those who have the patience to experience a well developed plot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2002

    Skip It

    After reading and enjoying Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo", "The Three Musketeers", and "Twenty Years After", this one was a big disappointment. The musketeers are hardly in it. The characters that are in it are flat and uninteresting. Also, there were too many long paragraphs in the book. There were a lot of paragraphs that went on for two or three pages and they were difficult for me to read. There were also a lot of pointless scenes thrown in for no reason. They were boring and distracting. This book was just a complete waste of my time and money.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 17, 2008

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 12 Customer Reviews

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