Louise the Big Cheese: Divine Diva

Overview

"Dream big" is Louise the Big Cheese's motto. But try though she might, she's just plain old Louise, no Cheese. When the casting call goes out for Cinderella, Louise just knows that it's her moment to shine and take the stage as the STAR of the show. Unfortunately, the director casts Louise as a mouse while her best friend, Fern, who wasn't even going to try out in the first place, gets to be Cinderella. Louise may be a mouse in the show, but in the end it's up to her to save the day.

...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (27) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (21) from $1.99   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (NOOK Kids)
$6.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

"Dream big" is Louise the Big Cheese's motto. But try though she might, she's just plain old Louise, no Cheese. When the casting call goes out for Cinderella, Louise just knows that it's her moment to shine and take the stage as the STAR of the show. Unfortunately, the director casts Louise as a mouse while her best friend, Fern, who wasn't even going to try out in the first place, gets to be Cinderella. Louise may be a mouse in the show, but in the end it's up to her to save the day.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A bubblegum pink jacket with glittery type will catch the eye of aspiring leading ladies and Fancy Nancy fans. Inside, they'll easily identify with the drama-loving protagonist of Primavera's (Auntie Claus) buoyant tale. Small in stature, Louise is sure that landing the role of Cinderella in her school play is her ticket to Broadway (her motto: “Dream big!”). Alas, her best friend Fern gets that part, while Louise is cast as a mouse, resulting in a spat between the girls. Caldecott Honor artist Goode's (When I Was Young in the Mountains) playful watercolors with whimsical and expressive black outlines capture Louise's mercurial personality, as when the would-be diva holds up the broken tail of her itchy, secondhand mouse costume in disgust, while Fern, in a “frilly pink big-cheese Cinderella ball gown,” delightedly rehearses her crowning line. Their friendship is restored in the end, as Louise rescues her pal when Fern freezes and forgets her lines. Hand-lettered dialogue balloons and humor-filled renderings of Louise's show-biz dreams, bursting with pink and magenta, drive home the heroine's larger-than-life outlook. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
Louise Cheese (a little girl, not, as the name would suggest, a mouse) "lived in a sleepy town on a quiet street in a modest town." But she longs to be a star, a divine diva Broadway bound. Alas, her dream of being a "big cheese" with the starring role in the school play of Cinderella is doomed to disappointment; worse, her (now former) best friend Fern stars instead. But on the fateful night of the play, Louise discovers that happiness and friendship are possible even for those who are not headed for Broadway—yet. Louise is somewhat overly reminiscent of Ian Falconer's indomitable Olivia; it's also unlikely that Louise (transparent as she is about all her intense feelings) would be able to hide the truth of her actual one-line role as a mouse from her parents until the night before the play. (And we are never shown any of her attempts to do this; we simply see her breaking the news to them at the eleventh hour.) Still, Louise is definitely the star of her own story, worthy of her longed-for divadom. Primavera and Goode are extremely skilled at crafting a kid-pleasing picture book, offering a true and satisfying collaboration between text and art; an extra treat is the quiz for prospective Broadway stars that closes the story. Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Louise Cheese dreams of being a big star. She wishes her parents were less ordinary and envies her older sister because Penelope has a big room and lots of shades of lipstick. When her teacher announces that the class is going to put on Cinderella, Louise is convinced that she will get the lead and this will be her ticket to Broadway. Then her friend Fern gets the role, and Louise is cast as one of the mice, thus severing their friendship. When Fern forgets her last line, Louise cues her and all ends happily. The watercolor and ink illustrations are very pink as Louise fantasizes in pink. Dialogue is in word bubbles, and there's a fair amount of text. The cover is pink, with letters that sparkle. This Fancy Nancy look-alike is a nice-enough story but it's been done many times before.—Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
Even second bananas sometimes have their day. Louise Cheese is a little girl with big dreams. She longs for her parents to be movers and shakers. She yearns to dress up and be glamorous like her sister Penelope. And when the time comes for the kids in Louise's class to try out for the school play, she is convinced that she will win the lead role. Instead, she is horrified to discover that her mousey best friend Fern has been given the part while Louise is relegated to being a mere mouse. The resulting spat between friends is resolved when Louise discovers that she can still play an important role in the play, even if it's not the one she initially envisioned. A perfect pairing to Kevin Henkes's Lilly's Big Day (2006), this book presents a protagonist with whom many a mini-diva will be able to identify from page one. Goode's liquid lines and sympathetic characters give the text the pop it deserves. Charming from endpapers to endpapers. (Picture book. 4-8)
From the Publisher
"A perfect pairing to Kevin Henkes's Lilly's Big Day (2006), this book presents a protagonist with whom many a mini-diva will be able to identify from page one. Goode's liquid lines and sympathetic characters give the text the pop it deserves. Charming from endpapers to endpapers." — Kirkus Reviews

"Louise makes a splash as a girl who knows what she wants (stardom!) and sees the future

(Broadway!) but can also deal with reality . . . Cue applause." — Booklist

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442420663
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
  • Publication date: 2/8/2011
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,013,947
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Elise Primavera

Elise Primavera is the author and illustrator of the New York Times bestselling Auntie Claus series and the popular Gum Street Girls Series. She is also the author of the Louise the Big Cheese books and other award-winning titles. She lives in New Jersey, and you can visit her at ElisePrimavera.com.

Diane Goode is the illustrator of dozens of beloved and critically acclaimed picture books, including several written by Cynthia Rylant: Alligator Boy; When I Was Young in the Mountains, a Caldecott Honor Book; and most recently, Baby Face: A Book of Love for Baby. She is also the illustrator of President Pennybaker and My Mom is Trying to Ruin My Life, both by Kate Feiffer. She lives and works in Watchung, New Jersey, with her husband, David, and their two dogs, Jack and Daisy. Visit her at web.mac.com/goodedog.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A STAR JUST WAITING TO BE BORN

    Every child probably has dreams, ambitions. A little boy may dream of becoming a football player or a fireman. A little girl may aspire to be a nurse or a model. Louise Cheese was not specific regarding her ambition - she simply wanted to be a big cheese. "Louise liked the limelight, she liked a lot of fuss...."

    This was a bit unusual as her parents were quiet, unassuming people. Penelope, her older sister, seemed to be quite content with her status quo ( Louise, of course, coveted Penelope's frilly bedroom and collection of lipsticks). The name of one of the lipsticks was Divine Diva, and Penelope told her that a Divine Diva was a big star. That's exactly what Louise wanted to be; she could see herself walking down a red carpet to accept her award. She told her best friend, Fern, about her plan, saying "Dream Big! That's my motto!)

    The perfect start for Louise would be to play the lead in the school play, Cinderella, and be discovered by a Broadway producer. She was so sure she was going to be chosen to play Cinderella that she told her parents she would probably be going to Broadway soon. However, first the tryouts.

    The outcome of those tryouts was a bit of a shock to Louise - even more so was the person chosen. When dreams are dashed friendships can be sorely tested but just as in Cinderella there is a happy ending.

    Charming illustrations by one of my favorite artists, Diane Goode, are wonderfully expressive. Don't miss the endpapers filled with Big and Little Cheeses throughout history.

    Enjoy!

    - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)