Love and Summer: A Novel

Love and Summer: A Novel

3.5 17
by William Trevor
     
 

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It's summer and nothing much is happening in Rathmoye. So it doesn't go unnoticed when a dark-haired stranger appears on his bicycle and begins photographing the mourners at Mrs. Connulty's funeral. Florian Kilderry couldn't know that the Connultys are said to own half the town: he has only come to Rathmoye to photograph the scorched remains of its burnt- out

Overview

It's summer and nothing much is happening in Rathmoye. So it doesn't go unnoticed when a dark-haired stranger appears on his bicycle and begins photographing the mourners at Mrs. Connulty's funeral. Florian Kilderry couldn't know that the Connultys are said to own half the town: he has only come to Rathmoye to photograph the scorched remains of its burnt- out cinema.

A few miles out in the country, Dillahan, a farmer and a decent man, has married again: Ellie is the young convent girl who came to work for him when he was widowed. Ellie leads a quiet, routine life, often alone while Dillahan runs the farm.

Florian is planning to leave Ireland and start over. Ellie is settled in her new role as Dillahan's wife. But Florian's visit to Rathmoye introduces him to Ellie, and a dangerously reckless attachment begins.

In a characteristically masterly way Trevor evokes the passions and frustrations felt by Ellie and Florian, and by the people of a small Irish town during one long summer.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The tragic consequences of a woman's lost honor and a family's shame haunt several generations in Trevor's masterful 14th novel. His prose precisely nuanced and restrained, Trevor depicts a society beginning to loosen itself from the Church's implacable condemnation of sexual immorality. Years ago, Miss Connulty's dragon of a mother forced her into lifelong atonement after she was abandoned by her lover. Now, in the mid-1950s, middle-aged and forever marked for spinsterhood in her small Irish town, she is intent on protecting Ellie Dillahan, the naïve young wife of an older farmer. A foundling raised by nuns, Ellie was sent to housekeep for the widowed farmer, and she is content until her dormant emotions are awakened by a charming but feckless bachelor, Florian Kilderry, who has plans to soon leave Ireland. Their affair is bittersweet, evoking Florian's regretful knowledge that he will cause heartbreak and Ellie's shy but urgent passion and culminating in a surprising resolution. Trevor renders the fictional town of Rathmoye with the precise detail of a photograph, while his portrait of its inhabitants is more subtle and painterly, suggesting their interwoven secrets, respectful traditions and stoic courtesy. (Sept.)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101148532
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/17/2009
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
465,679
File size:
316 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

William Trevor is the author of twenty-nine books, including Felicia’s Journey, which won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award and was made into a motion picture. In 1996 he was the recipient of the Lannan Award for Fiction. In 2001, he won the Irish Times Literature Prize for fiction. Two of his books were chosen by The New York Times as best books of the year, and his short stories appear regularly in the New Yorker. In 1997, he was named Honorary Commander of the British Empire. He lives in Devon, England.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Devon, England
Date of Birth:
May 24, 1928
Place of Birth:
Mitchelstown, County Cork, Ireland
Education:
Trinity College, Dublin, 1950

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Love and Summer 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
rpmcestmoi More than 1 year ago
William Trevor is a magnificent writer of the short story. He is also a fine writer of novels. This is one of the latter, and probably not his best, but it is head and shoulders above the dreck that poses as literary fiction these days. His grasp of the nuanced phrase, the sense of quirkiness of the characters in play, his economy...these are the talents of a master in play. Read him, read as much of him as you can. He is not going to be simply replaced when he is gone.
Grouch More than 1 year ago
The story revolves around a small Irish town in which a bunch of hopelessly muddled people muddle through a summer with very little for which to hope. It's gentle in that the villains actually think they're doing what they're doing for the best reasons, and it's just because they're Irish that what happens does indeed happen. It's a very pleasant read, as long as you don't expect any of the characters to be noble or behave rationally.
TomOLeary More than 1 year ago
I've just finished this perfect gem of a novel by masterful author William Trevor. It's impossible to come up with anything coherent that could convey why he is the greatest writer writing in the English language. William Trevor's work is subtle, poetic, humorous, truthful and heartbreaking. Always. I tip my hat to Mr. Trevor's genius once again. And I thank him for his illustrious unparalleled career.
BostonReader70 More than 1 year ago
I must respectfully disagree with the professional reviews of this novel. All other reviews state how wonderfully written, unforgettable and heart breaking this story is...sorry, I didn't get that. I trudged through the first 100 pages waiting for anything interesting to happen simply because of all the great reviews this novel received. Maybe the Irish language is a bit too different, or maybe it was simply because the way this author described everything seemed a bit vague and detached, but I never connected to any of the characters or felt any emotion toward them at all. I did finish the book only because I had read so much of it I figured I'd keep going. I was holding out hope that the ending would somehow magically make the rest of the book great. It did not. I'm sorry to say I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. The only reason I gave this book one star was because it was a short and quick read so therefor didn't waste much of my time.
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IEB More than 1 year ago
William Trevor portrays many characters that experience hardships during the Irish Revolution. His descriptive language of the Irish terrain enriches the tale as well as the fate of its people.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love and Summer was my book club's recent choice. I found it to be a miserable and uninspiring love story. The flatness of the unremarkable characters left them completely forgettable. I am an avid reader but I struggled to get through this dreary book. It didn't become remotely interesting until I was half way through it. My next choice for Book Club: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.