Love and Summer: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Love and Summer, the latest item from William Trevor's venerable suitcase, is a thrilling work of art."
-The New York Times Book Review


In spare, exquisite prose, master storyteller William Trevor presents a haunting love story about the choices of the heart, and the passions and frustrations of three lives during one long summer. Ellie is a shy orphan girl from the hill country, married to a man whose life ...
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Love and Summer: A Novel

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Overview

Love and Summer, the latest item from William Trevor's venerable suitcase, is a thrilling work of art."
-The New York Times Book Review


In spare, exquisite prose, master storyteller William Trevor presents a haunting love story about the choices of the heart, and the passions and frustrations of three lives during one long summer. Ellie is a shy orphan girl from the hill country, married to a man whose life has been blighted by an unspeakable tragedy. She lives a quiet life in the Irish village of Rathmoye, until she meets Florian Kilderry, a young photographer preparing to leave Ireland and his past forever. The chance intersection of these two lost souls sets in motion a poignant love affair that requires Ellie to make an impossible choice.


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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The tragic consequences of a woman's lost honor and a family's shame haunt several generations in Trevor's masterful 14th novel. His prose precisely nuanced and restrained, Trevor depicts a society beginning to loosen itself from the Church's implacable condemnation of sexual immorality. Years ago, Miss Connulty's dragon of a mother forced her into lifelong atonement after she was abandoned by her lover. Now, in the mid-1950s, middle-aged and forever marked for spinsterhood in her small Irish town, she is intent on protecting Ellie Dillahan, the naïve young wife of an older farmer. A foundling raised by nuns, Ellie was sent to housekeep for the widowed farmer, and she is content until her dormant emotions are awakened by a charming but feckless bachelor, Florian Kilderry, who has plans to soon leave Ireland. Their affair is bittersweet, evoking Florian's regretful knowledge that he will cause heartbreak and Ellie's shy but urgent passion and culminating in a surprising resolution. Trevor renders the fictional town of Rathmoye with the precise detail of a photograph, while his portrait of its inhabitants is more subtle and painterly, suggesting their interwoven secrets, respectful traditions and stoic courtesy. (Sept.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101148532
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 9/17/2009
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 379,966
  • File size: 215 KB

Meet the Author

William Trevor
William Trevor is the author of twenty-nine books, including Felicia’s Journey, which won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award and was made into a motion picture. In 1996 he was the recipient of the Lannan Award for Fiction. In 2001, he won the Irish Times Literature Prize for fiction. Two of his books were chosen by The New York Times as best books of the year, and his short stories appear regularly in the New Yorker. In 1997, he was named Honorary Commander of the British Empire. He lives in Devon, England.

Biography

"William Trevor is an extraordinarily mellifluous writer, seemingly incapable of composing an ungraceful sentence," Brooke Adams once wrote in the New York Times Book Review. Hailed by the New Yorker as "probably the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language," Trevor has also written over a dozen acclaimed novels as well as several plays. His characters are often people whose desires have been unfulfilled, and who come to rely on various forms of self-deception and fantasy to make their lives bearable.

Trevor was born in 1928 to a middle-class, Protestant family in Ireland. After graduating from Trinity College with a degree in history, he attempted to carve out a career as a sculptor. He moved to England in 1954 and exhibited his sculptures there; he also wrote his first novel, A Standard of Behavior, which was published in 1958 but met with little critical success. His second novel, The Old Boys, won the 1964 Hawthornden Prize for Literature and marked the beginning of a long and prolific career as a novelist, short-story writer and playwright.

Three of Trevor's novels have won the prestigious Whitbread Novel of the Year Award: The Children of Dynmouth, Fools of Fortune and Felicia's Journey. Felicia's Journey, about a pregnant Irish girl who goes to England to find the lover who abandoned her, was adapted for the screen in 1999 by director Atom Egoyan. Trevor, who has described himself as a short-story writer who enjoys writing novels, has also written such celebrated short stories as "Three People," in which a woman who murdered her disabled sister harbors an unspoken longing for the man who provided her with an alibi, and "The Mourning," about a young man who is pressed by political activists into planting a bomb (both from The Hill Bachelors).

Some critics have noted a change in Trevor's work over the years: his early stories tend to contain comic sketches of England, while his later ones describe Ireland with the elegiac tone of an expatriate. Trevor, who now lives in Devon, England, has suggested that he has something of an outsider's view of both countries. "I feel a sense of freshness when I come back [to Ireland]," he said in a 2000 Irish radio interview. "If I lived in, say, Dungarvan or Skibbereen, I think I wouldn't notice things."

As it stands, Trevor is clearly a writer who notices things, just as one of his characters notices "the glen and the woods and the seashore, the flat rocks where the shrimp pools were, the room she woke up in, the chatter of the hens in the yard, the gobbling of the turkeys, her footsteps the first marks on the sand when she walked to Kilauran to school" (The Story of Lucy Gault). Yet as Trevor told an interviewer for The Irish Times, "You mustn't write about what you know. You must use your imagination. Fiction is an act of the imagination." Trevor's fertile imagination captures, as Alice McDermott wrote in The Atlantic, "the terrible beauty of Ireland's fate, and the fate of us all -- at the mercy of history, circumstance, and the vicissitudes of time."

Good To Know

When Trevor was growing up, he wanted to be a clerk in the Bank of Ireland -- following in the footsteps of his father, James William Cox. Cox's career as a bank manager took the family all over Ireland, and Trevor attended over a dozen different schools before entering Trinity College in Dublin.

Trevor married his college sweetheart, Jane Ryan, in 1952. After the birth of their first son, Trevor worked for a time as an advertising copywriter in London. He also sculpted and worked as an art teacher, but gave up his sculpting after it became "too abstract."

In addition to the 1999 film Felicia's Journey, two other movies have been based on Trevor's works: Fools of Fortune (1990), directed by Pat O'Connor, and Attracta (1983), directed by Kieran Hickey. According to Trevor's agent, the plays Reading Turgenev and My House in Umbria are also being adapted for the screen.

Trevor is also the author of several plays, most of which are not in print in the U.S. Works include Scenes from an Album, Marriages, and Autumn Sunshine.

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    1. Also Known As:
      William Trevor Cox (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Devon, England
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 24, 1928
    2. Place of Birth:
      Mitchelstown, County Cork, Ireland
    1. Education:
      Trinity College, Dublin, 1950

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 18 of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 14, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I just don't know....

    I must respectfully disagree with the professional reviews of this novel. All other reviews state how wonderfully written, unforgettable and heart breaking this story is...sorry, I didn't get that. I trudged through the first 100 pages waiting for anything interesting to happen simply because of all the great reviews this novel received. Maybe the Irish language is a bit too different, or maybe it was simply because the way this author described everything seemed a bit vague and detached, but I never connected to any of the characters or felt any emotion toward them at all. I did finish the book only because I had read so much of it I figured I'd keep going. I was holding out hope that the ending would somehow magically make the rest of the book great. It did not. I'm sorry to say I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. The only reason I gave this book one star was because it was a short and quick read so therefor didn't waste much of my time.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Trevor. Enough said.

    William Trevor is a magnificent writer of the short story. He is also a fine writer of novels. This is one of the latter, and probably not his best, but it is head and shoulders above the dreck that poses as literary fiction these days.
    His grasp of the nuanced phrase, the sense of quirkiness of the characters in play, his economy...these are the talents of a master in play. Read him, read as much of him as you can. He is not going to be simply replaced when he is gone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 9, 2010

    A gentle Irish tale

    The story revolves around a small Irish town in which a bunch of hopelessly muddled people muddle through a summer with very little for which to hope. It's gentle in that the villains actually think they're doing what they're doing for the best reasons, and it's just because they're Irish that what happens does indeed happen. It's a very pleasant read, as long as you don't expect any of the characters to be noble or behave rationally.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    William Trevor is the best friend the English Language has ever had. Perfection!

    I've just finished this perfect gem of a novel by masterful author William Trevor. It's impossible to come up with anything coherent that could convey why he is the greatest writer writing in the English language.

    William Trevor's work is subtle, poetic, humorous, truthful and heartbreaking. Always. I tip my hat to Mr. Trevor's genius once again. And I thank him for his illustrious unparalleled career.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 29, 2013

    A good read with a sensible ending

    William Trevor portrays many characters that experience hardships during the Irish Revolution. His descriptive language of the Irish terrain enriches the tale as well as the fate of its people.

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  • Posted August 12, 2011

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2010

    Don't expect a shred of wit, passion, or romance in Love and Summer.

    Love and Summer was my book club's recent choice. I found it to be a miserable and uninspiring love story. The flatness of the unremarkable characters left them completely forgettable. I am an avid reader but I struggled to get through this dreary book. It didn't become remotely interesting until I was half way through it. My next choice for Book Club: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 16, 2011

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