Love and Terror in the God Encounter: The Theological Legacy of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, Volume One

Love and Terror in the God Encounter: The Theological Legacy of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, Volume One

by David Hartman
     
 

The intellectual legacy of one of the twentieth century's greatest religious thinkers-explained by a leading theologian of our day. "It is only through experiencing the contradictions in human existence, through being overwhelmed by the divine presence, through the finite human being feeling terror-stricken by the infinite majesty of God that one can develop an… See more details below

Overview

The intellectual legacy of one of the twentieth century's greatest religious thinkers-explained by a leading theologian of our day. "It is only through experiencing the contradictions in human existence, through being overwhelmed by the divine presence, through the finite human being feeling terror-stricken by the infinite majesty of God that one can develop an authentic religious personality."-David Hartman (from Chapter 6) Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik (1903-1993) profoundly influenced modern Orthodox Judaism in the United States-and Judaism as a whole-by opening up a discourse between the tradition of Torah study and Western philosophical thought. The future of both religious Zionism in Israel and of Orthodoxy in America hangs to a great extent on how we interpret his intellectual legacy. Dr. David Hartman's penetrating analysis of Rabbi Soloveitchik's work reveals a Judaism committed to intellectual courage, integrity, and openness.

A renowned theologian and philosopher, Hartman meticulously explores the subtlety and complexity of Rabbi Soloveitchik's theological thought, exposing a surprising intersection of halakhic tradition and modern Western theology-a confrontation that deepens and expands our spiritual understanding. Hartman's provocative interpretation bears witness to the legitimacy of remaining loyal to the Judaic tradition without sacrificing one's intellectual freedom and honesty

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In a densely written discourse, Hartman, a Jerusalem-based theologian and philosopher, pays tribute to his mentor, Rabbi Soloveitchik (known as "the Rav"), by examining several of his publications. Hartman reserves analysis of other writings for a forthcoming second volume. A brief introduction reveals something about the Rav as a leader of modern Orthodoxy, but one has to turn to sources such as Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff's The Rav for biographical information. Born in Poland in 1903, Soloveitchik studied with his father, a noted rabbi, and with private tutors. He earned a doctorate in philosophy at the University of Berlin and then came to the United States in 1932, settling in Boston, where he became the rabbinic leader of the Orthodox community. For 40 years, he commuted weekly to New York, where he served as senior rosh yeshiva at Yeshiva University. As Hartman states, the Rav was "the leading Orthodox talmudic scholar and theologian in North America." Using impenetrable language, Hartman scrutinizes three of the Rav's publications (Halakhic Man, The Lonely Man of Faith and Confrontation), and then devotes a chapter to his views on prayer. Hartman claims that the Rav reconciled studying Torah and Western philosophy simultaneously, but readers have to be experts in philosophy and Jewish theology to grasp Hartman's commentary. This book's severely restricted appeal fails to demonstrate just why the Rav's influence on modern Orthodoxy and Judaism in general was so profound. (Aug.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Rabbi J.B. Soloveitchik (1903-93), known as "the Rav," was the most prominent leader of modern Orthodox Judaism. Traditional Judaism was the basis of his education, and, upon arriving in the United States in 1932, he immediately started teaching Talmud and became famous for a brilliant exposition of Jewish law that emphasized the teachings of Maimonides. For many years, he taught at Yeshiva University, influencing thousands of students, including Hartman (emeritus, philosophy, Hebrew Univ., Israel; Maimonides: Torah and Philosophic Quest). In beautiful prose, Hartman explains and expands upon the philosophy of the Rav, who addressed our relationship with God and how it can be best achieved. The author describes the particular as it applies to Judaism and, at the same time, shows what is universal in our search for God. This work requires close reading, but given the brilliance of Soloveitchik's insights and Hartman's lucid explication, it is a very rewarding experience. Highly recommended for special and academic libraries. Idelle Rudman, Touro Coll. Lib., NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940000934258
Publisher:
Jewish Lights Publishing
Publication date:
07/01/2001
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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