Love Is the Killer App: How to Win Business and Influence Friends

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Are you wondering what the next killer app will be? Do you want to know how you can maintain and add to your value during these rapidly changing times? Are you wondering how the word love can even be used in the context of business?

Instead of wondering, read this book and find out how to become a ...
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Love Is the Killer App: How to Win Business and Influence Friends

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Overview

Are you wondering what the next killer app will be? Do you want to know how you can maintain and add to your value during these rapidly changing times? Are you wondering how the word love can even be used in the context of business?

Instead of wondering, read this book and find out how to become a lovecat—a nice, smart person who succeeds in business and in life.

How do you become a lovecat? By sharing your intangibles. By that I mean:
Your knowledge: everything that comes from all the books that I'll encourage you to devour.
Your network: the collection of friends and contacts you now have, which I'll teach you how to grow and nurture.
Your compassion: that human warmth you already possess—in these pages I'll convince you that you can show it freely at the office.

What happens when you do all this?
* You become a rich source of information to all around you.
* You are seen as a person with valuable insight.
* You are perceived as generous to a fault, producing surprise and delight.
* You double your business intelligence in one year.
* You triple your network of personal relationships in two years.
* You quadruple the number of colleagues in your life who love you like family.

In short, you become one of those amazing, outstanding people to whom everyone turns, who leads rather than follows, who never runs out of ideas, contacts, or friendship.

Here's the real scoop: Nice guys don't finish last. They rule!


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Tim Sanders is the apostle of a special brand of empathy and enlightened self-interest that he sometimes refers to as "bizlove" -- a mode of caring that's personally gratifying as well as conducive to success in today's relationship-oriented business environment. Those of you who feel little chills of discomfort dance along your spine when the words "love" and "workplace" come into proximity should relax: Sanders isn't talking about the moony, self-indulgent, "we're all OK" attitude you're probably fearing. His ideas, nicely expressed in this short but pithy book, are for motivated people with the smarts to realize that achievements (and happiness) come much easier to those who've cultivated positive connections with their colleagues, clients, and employers. Like such authors as Dale Carnegie and Stephen Covey, Sanders is concerned with the human factor -- the people skills, the networks, the little gestures of support, the fundamental attitudes -- that it takes to move any project or career forward. And if you're still feeling skeptical, consider for a moment the arc of Sanders's own career: In the space of a decade, he advanced from an unsatisfying sales job at a video-production studio to the position of chief solutions officer at Yahoo!, thanks largely to the "lovecat" philosophy he now generously shares with readers everywhere.

You may now be wondering exactly what it takes to show a little love when you land at your place of employment every weekday morning. Sanders succinctly defines business love as "the act of intelligently and sensibly sharing your intangibles with your bizpartners." The intangibles in question are your knowledge (Sanders is a truly passionate believer in the importance of educating yourself through reading), your network (the web of relationships that we're all continually spinning), and your compassion (the human ability to simply reach out to our fellow creatures). Used together, these three qualities "are the values that can drive your career to the top or over the top -- they'll take you wherever you want to go." Put most simply, Love Is the Killer App delivers the goods: It's an indispensable manual for anyone who wants to acquire the skills necessary for meaningful growth in the business world we all inhabit. Chances are you'll end up buying two copies -- one for yourself and one to pass along to a friend or coworker with whom you want to share your knowledge and your love. (Sunil Sharma)

Publishers Weekly
Remember when the online biz was the playground of the business world? Yahoo! exec Sanders does, and with a vengeful nostalgia. In his almost dementedly excited book on how to get ahead in business by being loveable and smart, Sanders beats the drum of the New Economy louder and more happily than just about anyone out there. The "Big Statement" here Sanders is a proponent of reading as much as possible and boiling it down to an essential Big Statement is that a kill-or-be-killed mentality won't get you far in today's business environment. Better to spread love, by connecting with people, giving out advice, using every available moment to increase your knowledge and being a "lovecat." It's hard not to get swept up by the rose-colored glow of this gleaming "bizlove" philosophy, where people are excited to come to work and where they give out hugs and encouragement to everyone they come across. But being a lovecat, Sanders emphasizes, does not mean being a sucker. Naturally, as with most hype, the relentlessly upbeat narrative leads to some ridiculous overgeneralizations, like "during the Depression people worried about survival. Today the affluent worry about whether or not they are going to have a good experience." Sanders also vastly overestimates the availability of choice in today's job market, saying that if your boss isn't reciprocating your love, just get a new job ("A fresh start is a mouse click away"). These lapses aside, he is convincing. Cynics will argue that a sheep in a pack of wolves will simply be eaten, but a sheep armed with Sanders's brand of intelligent enthusiasm will more likely charm the wolves into submission. (Feb. 14) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Tim Sanders shows us that being a ‘lovecat’ is a great business strategy and I wholeheartedly agree. This book teaches us the value of relationships in the workplace, and it’s rich with practical, effective strategies for enhancing and developing them.” —Philip C. McGraw, Ph.D., author of Life Strategies: Doing What Works, Doing What Matters

“This is not an ‘easy’ book. It is a genuine original. (And I know how overused that word is.) It will-should-must change your life. I know Tim Sanders—and he and this book are for real. Believe it. And become a (wildly successful) ‘lovecat.’ ” —Tom Peters, author of the bestselling In Search of Excellence and Reinventing Work series

“Aretha Franklin knew the secret: RESPECT. Tim Sanders knows how to spin it. In business, you get ahead by helping other people get what they want—it’s simple, it’s obvious, but it’s so easy to forget. Love Is the Killer App reminds us that maybe, just maybe, looking out for number one is not the way to get ahead.” —Seth Godin, author of Permission Marketing and Unleashing the Idea Virus

From the Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780609609224
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/5/2002
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Sanders, the Chief Solutions Officer at Yahoo!, consults with Fortune 500 executives and world-class brands on marketing and Internet strategy. He lives in northern California.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

I.

THE LOVECAT WAY

Not long ago, after I had delivered a speech on the new economy, a woman entering the job market approached me and told me she had career anxiety.

"I'm not worried that I won't land something good," she explained. "I'm afraid that work will be too cold and impersonal. What can I do to guarantee I'll be successful but also happy?"

The answer? The same advice I gave Chris: "Be a lovecat."

At a large sales conference last month, I met two men, one in accounting, the other in management; both of them were afraid. It wasn't that they feared the changes going on around them-they feared being left out of them.

"How do I drill into this World Wide Web thing?" one of them asked. "I don't know what to work on because this isn't my skill set. Am I still relevant? Is there anything I have to offer that can add value?"

The other man said, "I don't think I can compete with these kids þying out of schools loaded with their new-economy knowledge and jargon. Everyone else seems to be jumping into new roles, but I think the world is limiting me with all its rules and biases."

"That's not how the world is run," I replied. "It's run via intangibles -- knowledge, networks, and compassion."

It never seems to change. No matter how and where I meet these people, and no matter what their age or experience level, I have found one common truth: Men and women across the country are trying desperately to understand how to maintain their value as professionals in the face of rapidly changing times.

Until recently, bizpeople could survive for years without advice, without connection skills, perhaps even without new ideas. But now that the bizworld is moving at a velocity once unheard of, many of us can't keep up. We've made some bad decisions, we've received some bad advice, we didn't get connected to the right opportunities, we're feeling left behind or left out.

Technology has revolutionized our landscape. Before the information revolution, business changed gradually and business models became antiquated even more slowly. The value progression evolved over decades and double decades. You could go to college, get an M.B.A. and work for forty years, and your pure on-the-job knowledge stayed relevant. Relationships were for the most part geo-bound, and only a handful of people comprised your entire business network.

That was yesterday. Forget about today, because tomorrow is upon us. And to succeed in tomorrow's workplace, you need a killer application. (What's a killer app? There's no standard deÞnition, but basically it's an excellent new idea that either supersedes an existing idea or establishes a new category in its Þeld. It soon becomes so popular that it devastates the original business model.)

What is that application? Simply put: Love is the killer app. Those of us who use love as a point of differentiation in business will separate ourselves from our competitors just as world-class distance runners separate themselves from the rest of the pack trailing behind them.

This isn't just a feel-good message that I sense audiences want to hear. I believe that the most important new trend in business is the downfall of the barracudas, sharks, and piranhas, and the ascendancy of nice, smart people-because they are what I call lovecats. They will succeed for all the reasons you will discover in this book.

But first, what do I mean by love?

The best general definition I have ever read is in the noted philosopher and writer Milton Mayeroff's 1972 book On Caring: "Love is the selfess promotion of the growth of the other." When you are able to help others grow to become the best people they can be, you are being loving -- and you, too, grow.

Mayeroff actually used the word caring more often than the word love, although love is interchangeable with such terms as caring, charity, and compassion. But because "Show me the love" has such a ring to it in a business context, love is the word I prefer to use.

Mayero°, however, talked mostly about love in our personal lives. We need a different definition for love in our professional lives.

When we start a job, whether as recent graduate or CEO, we take on a contract to create more value than the dollar amount we are paid. If we don't add value to our employer, we are value losses; we are value vampires. My definition of added-value: The value with you inside a situation is greater than the value without you.

In your personal life, you can make decisions based on personal needs. If you wish to remain friendly with a toxic person, you have every right to do so. But business is not personal. Love in the bizworld is not some sacrificial process where we must all love one another come what may. There is no free love in the new economy. Every member of your team depends on each and every other member to contribute. You can't afford to take on people who will sink your value boat. So the definition of love must be modified to guarantee that it means not only you, but all the people who populate your bizworld, are value-added for that bizworld.

Here, then, is my definition of love business: the act of intelligently and sensibly sharing your intangibles with your bizpartners.

What are our intangibles? They are our knowledge, our network, and our compassion. These are the keys to true bizlove.

Who are our bizpartners? Potentially, they are each and every person in our work life, whether our bosses or bankers, our clients or competitors, the money guys with the cash to burn, the writers who spin it up so the stocks can churn.

In the following three chapters we will discuss each of the three intangibles in detail, but here they are in short form:

By knowledge, I mean everything you have learned and everything you continue to learn. Knowledge represents all you have picked up while doing your job, and all you have taught yourself by reading every moment you can Þnd the time. It means every piece of relevant data and information you can accumulate. You can Þnd knowledge almost anywhere-through observation, experience, or conversation. But by far the easiest, most efficient way to obtain knowledge is through books.

Think of your brain as a kind of piggy bank. Smart people fill it up with all they learn until they possess a formidable wealth of knowledge. Then there are those who sit around all day and never put anything in their bank; all they accumulate is a large butt. You see these people every day, on planes, trains, and in lounges, staring off into space, downing cocktails, heading off to business meetings ill-prepared. Like kids who don't know how to put pennies in their banks, these adults don't know how to accumulate knowledge.

When I give a speech, I often tell my audience that if they feel I have anything valuable to say, they should consider this: My knowledge isn't inherent. I wasn't born with an IQ of 200. I haven't started a colossal business. I am not a rocket scientist. Six years ago my career path wasn't any more remarkable than anyone else's. Then I went on a reading tear. And the more I read, the more I went into business meetings and won people's hearts -- and their business, too.

So what I say to my audiences is: Don't let a guy like me get a step up on you. Maybe you've been in business for twenty-five years. Maybe you have stuff on your résumé I would die for. Yet you're stopping in the race to let me catch up. And it's all because I keep reading.

I can't tell you how often people ask me after a speech, "Could you give me your book list? I should have been doing this for the last thirty years."

Says Harry Beckwith in The Invisible Touch: "Instead of thinking about value-added, think about knowledge-added. What knowledge can you add to your service, or communicate about your service, that will make you more attractive to . . . business partners and customers?"

By network, I mean your entire web of relationships. In the twenty-first century, our success will be based on the people we know. Everyone in our address book is a potential partner for every person we meet. Everyone can fit somewhere in our ever-expanding business universe.

Relationships are the nodes in our individual network that constitute the promise of our bizlife and serve as a predictor of our success. Some of the brightest new-economy luminaries, such as Kevin Kelly (New Rules for the New Economy), or Larry Downes and Chunka Mui (Unleashing the Killer App), argue that companies, organizations, and individuals comprise, and are most highly valued for, their web of relationships. If you organize and leverage your relationships as a network, you will generate long-lasting value (and peace of mind) beyond your stock options, mutual funds, and bank accounts. You will also create a value proposition for new contacts, which in turn drives membership in that network-the prime law of business ecosystems, known as the Law of Network Effects. Value explodes with membership, and the value explosion sucks in more members, compounding the result. These famous wise words put it more succinctly: Them that's got, gets.

But not all of us know to go out and get. Try out this metaphor: When we are born, we receive a fishing net. Throughout our lives we troll for contacts-while in school, at work, or through professional organizations and clubs. If we are fishing well, we accumulate a network of people who support us, who appreciate our value, who lead us to new opportunities. But not all of us use our net wisely. While some of us fill our nets with prizewinning fish, others let their nets languish and fall to the bottom of the ocean, stuffed only with the deadweight of old tires.

Those of us who end up with the best-stocked net have a most valuable commodity. When we are fully and totally networked, we are powerful. Alone, even with all the wisdom in the world, we are powerless: castaways adrift in an impersonal ocean. Without a network, knowledge is nearly useless. Knowledge is your power source or your battery, but relationship is your nerve center, your processor. You get value from your knowledge, but it becomes real when you share it with your network.

I believe that Silicon Valley's greatest innovation is not the invention of wowie-zowie hardware and software, but the social organization of its companies and, most important, the networked architecture of the region itself-the complex web of former jobs, intimate colleagues, information leakage from one Þrm to the next, rapid company life cycles, and the agile e-mail culture.

Once, scarcity created value. Today abundance can create value. In the old days, when we traded tangibles such as gold, the less gold that was available, the higher its value. Supply-and-demand ruled. Now the opposite can be true. Abundance creates power. If you have a great idea for running a business, and it is adapted throughout your industry, your idea is more, not less, valuable. Value today derives from an idea that everyone has accepted, and then competition sets in to perfect the execution of that idea.

The more people in your network, the more powerful the network. COPYRIGHT Copyright 2002 by Tim Sanders

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Interviews & Essays

Author Essay
The Rosetta Story

What is love in business? Love is a matter of sharing your knowledge, your network of relationships, and your compassion -- or any combination of the three. I have learned this lesson many times in life, and I learned it again last week at the DFW International Airport as I got my shoes shined.

After missing my flight to San Jose, I decided to go for a quick shine. A young lady named Rosetta greeted me at the stand and began to polish my shoes. She asked if I was a businessman, to which I proudly said, "Yes!" She then shared with me her desire to run a business of her own someday. She explained that she was a single parent of three kids, and she wanted to control her destiny as well as their future. She complained that business owners make all the money, and that she had more to offer than just a shine on shoes.

I immediately stopped reading the paper. I related to her aspirations. I looked in her right in the eyes and saw ambition, dignity, and fire. Thinking about the knowledge I could share with her, I suggested she read Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends & Influence People. I thought this would give her a good perspective on people and business. I told her about Entrepreneur magazine, and all of the business opportunities in each issue. I also talked to her about her current business -- running the household and running that stand.

"You have your own profit and loss statement, your own staff, and your own mission (to raise your kids). Basically, you're You Inc.!" She understood my point, smiled, and talked to me about how she makes decisions regarding spending money on education versus entertainment, and she talked about the investment value of renting versus owning her home. We agreed that everyone except total recluses conduct business, which means that everyone is a businessperson. The only difference is that the owner of the stand, for example, has a different set of problems -- payroll, taxes, insurance, rent -- than someone like Rosetta. So maybe, just maybe, she should study business first, and take the plunge with eyes wide open. I could tell she was enthused, and I felt great taking a few minutes to talk with her, about her.

The day before I'd left on this trip my publisher sent me 100 promotional flyers for my book to hand out whenever possible. As Rosetta finished my shoes, I had a brainstorm: I'll hire her to pass out some of these flyers to her customers! The flyers had the book cover, my picture, and a description of the book as well as my concept of love in business. So I gave Rosetta a big tip and asked if she'd help pass out these flyers, explaining to her that her stand was a powerful place to market a business book, and that she came in contract with powerful business people.

Rosetta was delighted. "I'll do you better," she said. "I know all the store managers in the airport as well as other shoeshine-stand operators. I'll give them some too. So please, may I have the entire stack?"

An hour later, running to my gate, I passed Rosetta's stand, where I saw her giving a flyer to one of her clients and talking up the book. She looked happier, she looked more fulfilled; her eyes were on fire!

The following week, I was running through DFW once more and noticed one of my flyers taped to a shoeshine stand -- not Rosetta's. When I ducked into a newsstand to get a copy of The Wall Street Journal, the cashier smiled at me and after some fumbling under the counter, produced another copy of the flyer. Actually, it was a copy of a copy -- Rosetta was adding value and spreading the word. Good people were working hard for me -- people whom I've never even met. The cashier wished me luck and told me that she couldn't wait to display and sell the book.

All in all, I've learned that everyone is powerful, everyone has a story to tell, and everyone is a businessperson. By sharing knowledge and compassion with Rosetta, I achieved word-of-mouth marketing in one of the most important nodes of the business world -- an international airport. I learned through books like Seth Godin's Unleashing the Ideavirus that people who travel can be very powerful sneezers, influencers, and gospel spreaders. I received an incredible return on investment for my time, compassion, and payment to Rosetta.

Don't let your next Rosetta slip by. She may be the bright spot in your day -- your No. 1 teammate in the business of life. (Tim Sanders)

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 19, 2010

    Good advice for business and life

    I enjoyed this book. It was given to me by a co-worker a couple years ago. I did not read it until recently. The business side of it talks about the early 2000s, but the thoughts in the book can be applied beyond business. I really enjoyed the chapter on 'Knowledge'. I put into practice some of the suggestions for note taking while reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2003

    Everybody's Hugging!

    Anyone with clients (isn't that all of us?) can learn a thing or two from Tim Sanders. In "Killer APP" he digs into his experience with high-profile clients to show how the "art" of building client and business relationships is actually a science that anyone can master. Truly a great read for anyone who is looking to expand who they know and what they can offer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2002

    A Book That Can Truly Change Your Life

    When you go to business school you always hear your professors lecture about fairness and goodness in business, but when you read the newspapers you hardly believe that those words could ever really apply to the 9-5 world. This book takes you from the abstract idea that you can be both a good person and a good businessperson and shows you exactly how to do it. Be a lovecat, the book explains, by sharing your intangible values--knowledge, network, and compassion. Be a lovecat, and your career will rocket up to the stars. In other words, as the book's conclusion explains, nice smart people really do succeed. This book shows you exactly how. Read this book and profit.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2002

    This book is terrible

    It's like falling down stairs in slow motion. It is just a disorganized recitation of Tim's limited experiences in the dot-com business world, quotes and references from other, more established charlatans, and half-cooked pabulum. This is just awful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2002

    Nice Smart People Succeed

    Tim Sanders has given business people a gift in this book: a wake-up call (or for some of us, a reminder) that Nice Smart People Succeed. His 'Lovecat Rules' emphasize sharing your Knowledge, Network and Compassion in a non-expectant way (that is, without requiring anything in return) -- in doing so, you create a personal brand identity as a trustworthy source of wisdom, connections and goodwill. Each of these commodities is in short supply in business, and so you inevitably gain a competitive advantage over people who are stingy with their ideas, their contacts and/or their emotions. Tim also emphasizes the practical aspects of these rules. Gain knowledge to share, he advises, by becoming an avid reader of business books, leavened with some spirituality and human potential titles. Be smart in your sharing by setting ground rules, especially if you're sharing with someone who may be a competitor. Don't force more 'bizlove' on anyone than that person is capable of assimilating, but do test their comfort zone. Tim is a marvelous presenter of these ideas in person, and it's a joy to find that he expresses them equally well in writing. I recommend that you buy this book for yourself -- and maybe even send a copy to someone who needs reminding that business is conducted between and among human beings who respond better in the long run to love and compassion that to cutthroat competition.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2002

    Spread the Love

    Tim hits the mark, dead center! Since listening to his book on CD, I have been living the principles daily, and reaping the rewards. The principles and concepts are so simple it is incredible. And, yes: Nice, smart people do win!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2002

    Its nice to be nice!

    I think Tim really brought back common values that should be included anywhere, anytime. Being a supervisor, I had a older employee that had been with the company 30 + years go around me to the chief, when I inquired why he just didn't work with me. He stated because in the past he never had a boss that he could trust. I stated it's not a matter of being friends, but a matter of me caring. Well, needless to say, this won him over and enlighten him that it's ok to be human at work. I think he could use a copy of this book.

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    Posted October 16, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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