Love Letters of Great Women by Ursula Doyle | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Love Letters of Great Women

Love Letters of Great Women

4.3 6
by Ursula Doyle
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Love Letters of Great Men was published to great success in November of 2008. It was a fantastic holiday hit that continued to sell well through Valentine's Day. The demand was fueled by the fictional book's presence in the hit film Sex and the City.
As a companion to Love Letters of Great Men, this anthology gives the other side of the story: the

Overview

Love Letters of Great Men was published to great success in November of 2008. It was a fantastic holiday hit that continued to sell well through Valentine's Day. The demand was fueled by the fictional book's presence in the hit film Sex and the City.
As a companion to Love Letters of Great Men, this anthology gives the other side of the story: the secret hopes and lives of some of the greatest women in history, from writers and artists to politicians and queens. From the private papers of Anne Boleyn and Jane Austen to those of Emily Dickinson and Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, Love Letters of Great Women collects together some of the most romantic letters in history.
In an age of cellphones, texts, and twitters, this timeless and unique collection reminds us that none of our new modes of communication can compare to the simple joy of sitting down to read a letter from the person they love most, making this a keepsake both men and women everywhere will want to give and receive.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this follow-up to Love Letters of Great Men, veteran editor Doyle mines six centuries for the romantic correspondence of extraordinary women. The earliest letter comes from Lady Joan Pelham in 1399, tactfully explaining to her husband why he must abandon his fight against Richard II to protect against immediate threats at home. Tragic letters from both Katherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn confess their love for Henry VIII, who would eventually execute both of them. Lord Byron provides the subject for more than one letter, illuminating his tangle of relationships, and other letters do the same for William Wordsworth and Robert Schuman. Revealing letters include Queen Victoria's, exposing her cloying relationship with Prince Albert; and a letter from Emily Dickinson to her sister-in-law and long-time companion, Susan Gilbert. Doyle enriches her collection with succinct but insightful background notes, though her selections are primarily from Europe, with only a few American representatives (Abigail Adams, Edith Wharton, and Dickinson), and none from the rest of the world.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal
Doyle (former deputy publisher of Picador) has followed up her Love Letters of Great Men (the book published to capitalize on public demand for the fictitious book of love letters read aloud in the movie Sex and the City) with this selection of feminine missives. The two volumes are not companionate texts in that the letters collected here are not companions to those collected in Great Men. Each letter is prefaced with a brief biographical sketch of the author, but the selections themselves are too meager to provide much insight on any particular writer. Doyle does not give her basis for choosing these particular letters, nor does she discuss the scope from which she drew them. VERDICT Readers in search of great love letters might do better to start with an author of interest or with a time period or themed collection such as Babbette Hine's Love Letters, Lost. An optional purchase for public libraries.—Felicity D. Walsh, Emory Univ., Decatur, GA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429969147
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
11/24/2009
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
171 KB

Meet the Author

URSULA DOYLE was born in 1967. She graduated from King's College, Cambridge with an English degree in 1989. Since then she has worked as an editor in publishing, firstly at Granta, where she was deputy editor, then at Picador. She is currently editorial director of Virago. She lives in London and was the editor for Love Letters of Great Men.


Ursula Doyle lives in London where she was, until recently, the deputy publisher of Picador. She is the editor of the book Love Letters of Great Men.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Love Letters of Great Women 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Abbie8 More than 1 year ago
I was at awe to have found this book at a local bookstore on sale at $4.00, I just had to buy it. It gives me goose-bumps to read intimate, and at one point in time- private letters which although written more than two ceturies ago, still echo what every women in love or has ever been in love still feel today. 'How often do I not re-read your letters! I press them to my heart, I cover them with kisses.'- Mdme Roland 1754
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ashbrux More than 1 year ago
I have never read Love Letters of Great Men, but when I saw Love Letters of Great Women in the store I really could not pass it up. It was on the table for Valentine's Day. It had a pretty cover. Quite a bit of white space when I was looking for a quick read. And a quick look at the back flap assured me that I would find at least a few good letters in this collection. But what I found wasn't quite what I was expecting. In fact, I think it was better. I was looking for a gushy romantic collection of letters from women to their loved ones, but many of the letters in this book are business like. The women in this collection might be in love, but they are also serious, assertive women with thought provoking ideas. Ursula Doyle's introductions to each woman left me asking thousands of questions and wondering why I had never heard of some of these women before. When I read her introduction to the book I wondered if I was going to enjoy it, mostly because of this: For the Great Men of history, the matter of who they loved and who they might marry was but on aspect of their lives; their Greatness rested on their achievements in other spheres: scientific discovery, exploration, conquest, political triumph, artistic endeavour. These avenues were not open to most women until shockingly recently, and it is a sad fact that the Greatness of many of the women in this collection rests either on who they married or to whom they gave birth... (2) But after considering, I realized that this is mostly true. It's a great introduction as well, because Doyle spends the majority of her introductions talking about what these women did outside of their marriages. She does allow their accomplishments to come out, and the romance takes a backseat. So is this the ideal read for Valentine's Day, or a romantic weekend? Probably not. But it is an ideal read for anyone interested in women's history and relationships. Doyle is honest too, which makes the book that much better. I particularly enjoyed her honesty about Emily Dickinson's relationship with Susan Gilbert. No need to skirt around the corners people. Emily loved Susan. Other women I particularly enjoyed in this book were Lady Mary Pierrepont, Abigail Smith Adams, Manon Jeanne Philipon, Marie-Josphe-Rose Tascher de la Pagerie, Maria Branwell Bronte, Claire Clairmont, Queen Victoria, and Katherine Mansfield.