Love, Mouserella

Love, Mouserella

4.0 1
by David Ezra Stein, Susan Bennett
     
 

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Mouserella misses her grandmouse, so she writes her a letter. At first she can't think of anything to say, but once she starts, the news begins to flow - she found a cat whisker at the zoo, she taught her ladybug to fetch, she made shadow puppets with Dadmouse during a blackout - and just like that, the events of the past few days come to vivid life in her letter,

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Overview

Mouserella misses her grandmouse, so she writes her a letter. At first she can't think of anything to say, but once she starts, the news begins to flow - she found a cat whisker at the zoo, she taught her ladybug to fetch, she made shadow puppets with Dadmouse during a blackout - and just like that, the events of the past few days come to vivid life in her letter, as does her love for Grandmouse.

Children will enjoy reading the story from top to bottom, like a real letter, and Mouserella's funny drawings and lively adventures will spark their imaginations and just might inspire them to start a correspondence of their own.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When Mouserella's mother suggests that she write a letter to her grandmouse, the result is a diary-style story filled with Mouserella's scrawled crayon drawings and Stein's paintings of Polaroid-style photos that the young mouse has purportedly taken. Mouserella's love of Grandmouse, who lives out in the country, is evident as she describes visiting a museum and a zoo, teaching her ladybug to fetch, and creating a huge (but short-lived) wall of blocks to separate her side of the room from her brother, Ernie's. Mouserella's ebullience comes through on every page: "I don't know what to write," she writes, proceeding to doodle flowers instead. She even includes a small gift (a ketchup packet from the museum cafeteria) with the admonition "P.S. don't squash this letter or you'll break the pack of ketchup." Mouserella's delightfully precocious letter—which unfolds calendar-style, allowing Stein (Interrupting Chicken) to make the most of the faux lined-stationery background—is probably best suited for children with the skills to craft letters of their own. After this exercise in joyful self-expression, they'll certainly want to. Ages 3–5. (Sept.)
Booklist
"A clever and enticingly child-friendly format. . . . . Young ones will have more than their fair share of fun, and they'll understand the longing for someone who's gone away."
From the Publisher
"Showing [Stein's] customary gift for spot-on evocations of childlike voice and sensibility. . . . Sometimes snail mail is just better. Here's proof." — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"A clever and enticingly child-friendly format. . . . . Young ones will have more than their fair share of fun, and they'll understand the longing for someone who's gone away." — Booklist

"Mouserella's ebullience comes through on every page. . . . Delightfully precocious letter. . . . Exercise in joyful self-expression." — Publishers Weekly

"Will prompt children to think about their own letter writing. Those who have never written a letter will be encouraged to do so." — School Library Journal

School Library Journal - Audio
PreS-Gr 1—Mouserella's letter to her Grandmouse describes her days with the meandering topics of a child, occasionally concluding "and that's all…but" as she continues with descriptions of her daily activities. Listeners learn about her pet caterpillar and the ladybug she has taught to fetch, a visit to the zoo with a scary cat, a blackout, and how to make shadow bunnies. They will want to scrutinize Mouserella's drawings, pictures from her new camera, and illustrations of the events she describes as they follow along with the book. Author David Ezra Stein has also illustrated this terrific book (Penguin/Nancy Paulsen Books, 2011), creating illustrations with watercolors, stencils, and water-soluble crayons that perfectly reflect a young child's artwork, down to the doodled end pages and ice-pop splotches. The conversational pace of the narration by Michele O. Medlin makes the hand-printed text with its multicolored and occasionally all capital lettering easy to follow. She skillfully captures a child's intonation. Page-turn signals are optional. The limited vocabulary, engaging illustrations, and childish sensibilities allow this to work as an early reader. Paired with the book, it may also inspire children to write letters to family and friends.—Janet S. Thompson, Chicago Public Library, IL
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—Mouserella's grandmouse left three days ago, so the young mouse writes her a letter telling her about what has happened since she went home. She has completed her beaded belt, and while at the zoo with her family, she picked up a cat whisker. Her caterpillar is in the chrysalis stage. Her letter, written on yellow, blue, green, and pink paper, contains crayon drawings, color photographs, and a package of ketchup (she ate fries in the cafeteria). She reminisces about the ladybug they found and the time they spend together improving their posture. Opening the cover of this book, which resembles an addressed envelope, will prompt children to think about their own letter writing. Those who have never written a letter will be encouraged to do so when they see how quickly Mouserella overcomes writer's block and how easy it is to express one's thoughts on paper. Stein uses watercolor, stencils, crayon, and pencil to illustrate the little mouse's artistic accomplishment. Children and adults can talk about the importance and benefits of written communication after sharing this book.—Tanya Boudreau, Cold Lake Public Library, AB, Canada

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781464040337
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
03/28/2012

Meet the Author

David Ezra Stein (www.davidezra.com) received a Caldecott Honor for Interrupting Chicken and the Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award for Leaves, which was also a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, a Kirkus Reviews Editor's Choice and a School Library Journal Best Book. He lives in Kew Gardens, New York.

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Love, Mouserella 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago