Lovelife

Lovelife

by Lush
     
 
With striking female guitarist-vocalists Miki Berenyi and Emma Anderson at the fore, Lush had enjoyed cult success since 1990 with their delightful if intangible vocal harmonies, jangly guitar rhythms, alarmingly loud live shows, and association with terminally hip indie label 4AD. Many were surprised then that the quartet's fourth album, LOVELIFE, contained mostly

Overview

With striking female guitarist-vocalists Miki Berenyi and Emma Anderson at the fore, Lush had enjoyed cult success since 1990 with their delightful if intangible vocal harmonies, jangly guitar rhythms, alarmingly loud live shows, and association with terminally hip indie label 4AD. Many were surprised then that the quartet's fourth album, LOVELIFE, contained mostly mainstream pop songs, rendered short and sharp. Charges that they were jumping aboard the then-prevalent Brit-pop bandwagon might have carried weight were the songs not a cut above most of the '60s retreads being offered by other, older groups. Particularly potent offerings on LOVELIFE are the Buzzcocks-like "Ladykillers," Miki's duet with Pulp's Jarvis Cocker on "Ciao!," the sugar-sweet "500," and the wry and infectious "Single Girl," which begins by lamenting solo status and concludes by celebrating it. Sadly, drummer Chris Acland adhered to neither that particular moral or the album title, and he committed suicide in 1996 after ending a personal relationship. Though this 1996 release proved to be their most successful album, Lush ultimately decided not to replace Acland and subsequently split up.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Lovelife represents a major shift in style for Lush. Nearly abandoning the trancy melodies and droning guitars that were its trademark, the band has crafted an album full of sharp hooks and melodies, one that owes a great deal to the Britpop mania of 1995. From the circular melody of the opening "Ladykillers," it's clear that Lush had been influenced by the direct, jagged pop of Elastica, but the band also has reached back into '60s pop. All of the ballads on Lovelife are rooted in the hazy dream pop of the early '90s, but they are given stylish, mod arrangements complete with muted brass. Even more startling is the Nancy Sinatra/Lee Hazlewood pastiche of "Ciao!," an irresistible duet between Miki Berenyi and Pulp's Jarvis Cocker. Lovelife simply would have been an embarrassing attempt to seem fashionable if the band hadn't succeeded in updating its sound. However, Lush has been able to recreate itself as a pop band and the result is its most direct -- and arguably most rewarding -- album.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/05/1996
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624617020
catalogNumber:
46170

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Lush   Primary Artist
Pete Bartlett   Guitar,Piano,Hand Clapping
Jarvis Cocker   Vocals
Susan Dench   Viola
Terry Edwards   Trumpet
Kate Holmes   Flute
Leo Payne   Violin,Viola
Audrey Riley   Cello
Michael Kearsey   Trombone
Chris Aclund   Drums
Emma Anderson   Guitar,Horn,Vocals,Hand Clapping
Miki Berenyi   Guitar,Horn,Vocals,Hand Clapping
Philip King   Bass,Bass Guitar,Talking
Chris Acland   Drums
Dan Goodwin   Percussion
Christopher Tombling   Violin

Technical Credits

Lush   Producer
Billy Childish   Poetry
Pete Bartlett   Producer,Contributor
Jarvis Cocker   Contributor
Giles Hall   Engineer
Audrey Riley   Arranger,Horn Arrangements,String Arrangements
Philip King   Poetry,Poetry Reading
Peter Barlett   Producer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >