Lovey and Dovey

Lovey and Dovey

by Elle Van Lieshout, Erik Van Os, Mies Van Hout
     
 

Lovey and Dovey have stolen each other's hearts and a pair of blue socks from the shop on the corner. That's why they're in prison. The robbers have made their cell so comfortable that, when released, they don't know what to do. Fortunately, an attractive pair of pink socks might send them right back home.

Overview

Lovey and Dovey have stolen each other's hearts and a pair of blue socks from the shop on the corner. That's why they're in prison. The robbers have made their cell so comfortable that, when released, they don't know what to do. Fortunately, an attractive pair of pink socks might send them right back home.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Kirkus Review - Children (01/01/2009):

A starred review.  A winsome prison fable from the Netherlands. Lovey and Dovey, she plump, he thin as a rail, both clad in prison stripes, have & quot;stolen each other & apos;s hearts & quot; & #x2014;but that & apos;s not why they languish in Katakom. They also stole a pair of blue socks, which they now wear, Lovey on her right foot, Dovey on his left. When Lovey complains about the view, Dovey squeezes through the bars, tears a square of & quot;sun and sea & quot; from the landscape and takes it back to their cell to hang on the wall. This is followed by the moon, an apple tree and so on. A wordless subplot depicts a rabbit artist who follows Dovey, painting in his own designs on the blank silhouettes left behind by Dovey & apos;s thefts. Van Hout places her endearing convicts, rendered as line-and-color cartoons, against soft-edged backgrounds, the harsh gray of the cell modulating to bright pastels as the outside is brought in, piece by piece. & quot;But one day, disaster struck: they were released. & quot; The resolution may well bring pause to adults, but children will respond to its daffy logic and celebrate along with the lovers. (Picture book. 5-8)(COPYRIGHT (2009) KIRKUS REVIEWS/NIELSEN BUSINESS MEDIA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.)

Publishers Weekly

Imprisoned in a "dismal dungeon" for stealing a pair of socks, soulmates Lovey and Dovey have also "stolen each other's hearts," and in order to bring Lovey what she desires, Dovey sneaks outside (don't ask) and steals the sun, moon and stars-literally. Van Hout's (The Child Cruncher ) clever watercolors feature various landscapes from which Dovey neatly cuts or lassos vital pieces, and he portrays plump Lovey reveling amid the scenery that Dovey has smuggled into their cell. Full-bleed illustrations, comic and unabashedly heartwarming, brim with details that encourage a second reading. As Dovey steals the image of an apple tree, a rabbit paints over the white hole Dovey's theft creates; two prison mice mimic the antics of the main characters throughout. Quirky, playful and altogether inviting. Ages 5-7. (Jan.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3

This offbeat story features a loving couple who share a jail cell in the "most dismal dungeon of Katakom" because they stole a pair of blue socks. They are glad they have one another, but Lovey complains about their stark surroundings, so Dovey squeezes between the window bars each day and brings back something beautiful from the outside world to cheer his woman. On one occasion, he cuts out a view of the sun and sea. On another, he lassos the moon and a patch of star-filled sky. Then it's a tree filled with tasty apples to relieve the boredom of their bread and water diet. With each foray, their jail cell becomes cozier and more beautiful, and they are quite content. Then, "disaster" strikes and, much to their horror, they are released. A rail-thin Dovey and his buxom partner, each sporting one blue sock and gray-and-white striped prison garb (hers low cut), are outlined in black atop soft pastel spreads. Dovey is bald and Lovey's bright orange hair pokes up in two ponytails. Their unusual method of transforming their cell, along with this charming jailbird-pair's solution to the problem of their unwanted freedom, will have readers chuckling.-Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT

Kirkus Reviews
A winsome prison fable from the Netherlands. Lovey and Dovey, she plump, he thin as a rail, both clad in prison stripes, have "stolen each other's hearts"-but that's not why they languish in Katakom. They also stole a pair of blue socks, which they now wear, Lovey on her right foot, Dovey on his left. When Lovey complains about the view, Dovey squeezes through the bars, tears a square of "sun and sea" from the landscape and takes it back to their cell to hang on the wall. This is followed by the moon, an apple tree and so on. A wordless subplot depicts a rabbit artist who follows Dovey, painting in his own designs on the blank silhouettes left behind by Dovey's thefts. Van Hout places her endearing convicts, rendered as line-and-color cartoons, against soft-edged backgrounds, the harsh gray of the cell modulating to bright pastels as the outside is brought in, piece by piece. "But one day, disaster struck: they were released." The resolution may well bring pause to adults, but children will respond to its daffy logic and celebrate along with the lovers. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590786604
Publisher:
Lemniscaat USA
Publication date:
02/07/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Elle van Lieshout and Erik van Os, a husband-and-wife team, write books, songs, and poetry for young children and beginning readers.  Their picture-book titles include The Nice Party, The Nothing King, and The Wish. 

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