Loving Someone Who Has Dementia: How to Find Hope while Coping with Stress and Grief

Loving Someone Who Has Dementia: How to Find Hope while Coping with Stress and Grief

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by Pauline Boss
     
 

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Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia

Nearly half of U.S. citizens over the age of 85 are suffering from some kind of dementia and require care. Loving Someone Who Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. The book is

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Overview

Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia

Nearly half of U.S. citizens over the age of 85 are suffering from some kind of dementia and require care. Loving Someone Who Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. The book is for caregivers, family members, friends, neighbors as well as educators and professionals—anyone touched by the epidemic of dementia. Dr. Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss"—having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent.

  • Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia
  • Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be
  • Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving

Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
With numerous new books on all aspects of growing older, publishers are targeting the baby boomer population—including the increasing percentage of elderly people who suffer from dementia or, more accurately, the increasing number of people who become caretakers for those with dementia. Among these titles, this slight text by clinical psychologist Boss (family social science, emeritus, Univ. of Minnesota; Ambiguous Loss: Learning To Live with Unresolved Grief) emphasizes that the patient is both present and gone and that grieving in such a situation is difficult because it is prolonged and unmarked by cultural rituals. These are certainly interesting ideas, but the result is the same old advice: take care of yourself, seek emotional support, get help. VERDICT A good addition for caregivers who need a quick lift, but Nancy L. Mace and Peter V. Rabins's The 36-Hour Day and Susan M. McCurry's When a Family Member Has Dementia are better starting points.—Mary Ann Hughes, Shelton, WA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118077283
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
06/24/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
245,253
File size:
2 MB

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