Low Level Hell: A Scout Pilot in the Big Red One

Low Level Hell: A Scout Pilot in the Big Red One

4.9 11
by Hugh L. Mills Jr., Robert A. Anderson
     
 

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The aeroscouts of the 1st Infrantry Division had three words emblazoned on their unit patch: Low Level Hell.  This was the perfect definition of what these pilots experienced as the ranged the skies of Vietnam.  Mills tells the combat experiences of these aviators.  See more details below

Overview

The aeroscouts of the 1st Infrantry Division had three words emblazoned on their unit patch: Low Level Hell.  This was the perfect definition of what these pilots experienced as the ranged the skies of Vietnam.  Mills tells the combat experiences of these aviators.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307537928
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/16/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
332
Sales rank:
120,438
File size:
5 MB

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Low Level Hell 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
EugeneTX More than 1 year ago
Mills has outdone himself and every other pilot who has ever flown little birds in a real tactical environment. This book is outstanding and if one wanted to make it even better, find a place to purchase a two hour ride in the left seat just to get a real feel for the aircraft, or any aircraft for that matter because the sensation of flight would be there. It is obvious that Mills was thoroughly professional, knew what the mission was, and was going to accomplish it to the best of his ability. He talks exactly like every pilot who became one with their aircraft even as the pre-flight inspection began. He had a unique feel for little and subtle changes in the aircraft that was, in fact, a warning sign for him that things were not right. I love his philosophy on awards for the crew because a lot of times, the only way a pilot completed his turn or completed an evasive action was because of the very real heroism of the Gunner/Crew Chief in getting suppressive fire out to the side. These guys are absolutely incredible and absolutely unbelieveable. One second hanging outside the aircarft suspended by a GP strap, firing face to face with several enemy soldiers armed with AK-47's, rounds hitting the crew compartment on every side of them and sometimes passing through the bird but they can come back in laughing. They act like it is just the shootout at the OK Corral all over again but these exchanges amount to between 300 and 500 rounds with tracer. The best fireworks you will ever see. It is also obvious from the book that Mills cared a lot about his crewmembers and cared a lot about the Scouts pilots. This book is crammed with exciting stories and one can discern just how much the pilot was wedded to the bird. You do not really have to move the cyclic much to get a reaction. You really just think it to do what you want and it happens. A helicopter pilot is working four things at one time. The two floor pedals with his feet, the cyclic to tilt the rotor disc in the direction he wants to move, and the collective to make the power adjustments he must make to allow him to make his other movements. All that, talk and coordinate on three radio nets, give your gunner instructions for where you need fire, coordinate the actions of other pilots, and make sure you keep the bad guys where you want them. Very good work mills. Excellent, excellent book. Highly recommend that one read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a friend of mine with whom I have served, Hugh recounts the saga of the Army helicopter pilot in Vietnam. Young and fearless men who flew their aircraft as easily as one drives a car. Most people have never had to encounter the danger that these men faced-and thanks to them, they never will! Outstanding book that all should read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I work with Hugh and enjoyed reading the book.. it makes more sense when you have to work with him and get to see him in an everyday environment.. That's just the way Hugh is.. its great.. HAHA I GOT MY BOOK AUTOGRAPHED!!
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Tigerjuice More than 1 year ago
I read this and was immediately in the cockpit of a Little Bird with Hugh Mills. It was interesting, sprinkled with detail that made the experience authentic and something else happened: I was in the mind of a guy from Middle America, a decent man who was coping successfully with the moral component of war. His humanity was evident, even as his warrior component exhibited itself. This was not stated in bold print, or even hinted at, but came out clearly as the story unfolded. And the story was crammed with action, the chronology clear and the events remembered fully. An excellent read. Kudos too to Robert A. Anderson.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It opened my eyes to what went on over there. Reading this book made me respect more what my father went through as a helicopter mechanic. I tried to become a pilot of the same helicopter for the Army, but too many health problems. Thanks for writing such a book as this!