LTE - The UMTS Long Term Evolution: From Theory to Practice / Edition 2

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Overview

"Where this book is exceptional is that the reader will not just learn how LTE works but why it works"
Adrian Scrase, ETSI Vice-President, International Partnership Projects

Following on the success of the first edition, this book is fully updated, covering the latest additions to LTE and the key features of LTE-Advanced.

This book builds on the success of its predecessor, offering the same comprehensive system-level understanding  built on explanations of the underlying theory, now expanded to include complete coverage of Release 9 and the developing specifications for LTE-Advanced. The book is a collaborative effort of more than 40 key experts representing over 20 companies actively participating in the development of LTE, as well as academia. The book highlights practical implications, illustrates the expected performance, and draws comparisons with the well-known WCDMA/HSPA standards. The authors not only pay special attention to the physical layer, giving an insight into the fundamental concepts of OFDMA-FDMA and MIMO, but also cover the higher protocol layers and system architecture to enable the reader to gain an overall understanding of the system.

Key New Features:

  • Comprehensively updated with the latest changes of the LTE Release 8 specifications, including improved coverage of Radio Resource Management RF aspects and performance requirements
  • Provides detailed coverage of the new LTE Release 9 features, including: eMBMS, dual-layer beamforming, user equipment positioning, home eNodeBs / femtocells and pico cells and self-optimizing networks
  • Evaluates the LTE system performance
  • Introduces LTE-Advanced, explaining its context and motivation, as well as the key new features including: carrier aggregation, relaying, high-order MIMO, and Cooperative Multi-Point transmission (CoMP).
  • Includes an accompanying website containing a complete list of acronyms related to LTE and LTE-Advanced, with a brief description of each (http://www.wiley.com/go/sesia_theumts)

This book is an invaluable reference for all research and development engineers involved in implementation of LTE or LTE-Advanced, as well as graduate and PhD students in wireless communications. Network operators, service providers and R&D managers will also find this book insightful.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470660256
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 9/21/2011
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 792
  • Sales rank: 985,944
  • Product dimensions: 6.72 (w) x 9.82 (h) x 1.88 (d)

Table of Contents

Editors' Biographies.

List of Contributors.

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

List of Acronyms.

1 Introduction and Background (Thomas Sälzer and Matthew Baker).  

1.1 The Context for the Long Term Evolution of UMTS.

1.2 Requirements and Targets for the Long Term Evolution.

1.3 Technologies for the Long Term Evolution.

1.4 From Theory to Practice.

References.

Part I Network Architecture and Protocols.

2 Network Architecture (Sudeep Palat and Philippe Godin).

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 Overall Architectural Overview.

2.3 Protocol Architecture.

2.4 Quality of Service and EPS Bearers.

2.5 The E-UTRAN Network Interfaces: S1 Interface.

2.6 The E-UTRAN Network Interfaces: X2 Interface.

2.7 Summary.

References.

3 Control Plane Protocols (Himke van der Velde).

3.1 Introduction.

3.2 Radio Resource Control (RRC).

3.3 PLMN andCell Selection.

3.4 Paging.

3.5 Summary.

References.

4 User Plane Protocols (Patrick Fischer, SeungJune Yi, SungDuck Chun and YoungDae Lee).

4.1 Introduction to the User Plane Protocol Stack.

4.2 Packet Data Convergence Protocol.

4.2.1 Functions and Architecture.

4.3 Radio Link Control (RLC).

4.4 Medium Access Control (MAC).

4.5 Summary of the User Plane Protocols.

References.

Part II Physical Layer for Downlink.

5 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) (Andrea Ancora, Issam Toufik, Andreas Bury and Dirk Slock).

5.1 Introduction.

5.2 OFDM.

5.3 OFDMA.

5.4 Conclusion.

References.

6 Introduction to Downlink Physical Layer Design (Matthew Baker).

6.1 Introduction.

6.2 Transmission Resource Structure.

6.3 Signal Structure.

6.4 Introduction to Downlink Operation.

References.

7 Synchronization and Cell Search (Fabrizio Tomatis and Stefania Sesia).

7.1 Introduction.

7.2 Synchronization Sequences and Cell Searchin LTE.

References.

8 Reference Signals and Channel Estimation (Andrea Ancora and Stefania Sesia).  

8.1 Introduction to Channel Estimation and Reference Signals.

8.2 Design of Reference Signals inLTE.

8.3 RS-Aided Channel Modelling and Estimation.

8.4 Frequency Domain Channel Estimation.

8.5 Time-Domain Channel Estimation.

8.6 Spatial Domain Channel Estimation.

8.7 Advanced Techniques.

References.

9 Downlink Physical Data and Control Channels (Matthew Baker and Tim Moulsley).

9.1 Introduction.

9.2 Downlink Data-Transporting Channels.

9.3 Downlink Control Channels.

9.4 Concluding Remarks.

References.

10 Channel Coding and Link Adaptation (Brian Classon, Ajit Nimbalker, Stefania Sesia and Issam Toufik).

10.1 Introduction.

10.2 Link Adaptation and Feedback Computation.

10.3 Channel Coding.

10.4 Concluding Remarks.

References.

11 Multiple Antenna Techniques (David Gesbert, Cornelius van Rensburg, Filippo Tosato and Florian Kaltenberger).

11.1 Fundamentals of Multiple Antenna Theory.

11.2 MIMO Schemes in LTE.

11.3 Concluding Remarks.

References.

12 Multi-User Scheduling and Interference Coordination (Issam Toufik and Raymond Knopp).

12.1 Introduction.

12.2 General Considerations for Resource Allocation Strategies.

12.3 Scheduling Algorithms.

12.4 Considerations for Resource Schedulingin LTE.

12.5 Interference Coordination and Frequency Reuse.

12.6 Concluding Remarks.

References.

13 Radio Resource Management (Francesc Boixadera).

13.1 Introduction.

13.2 Overview of UE Mobility Activities.

13.3 Cell Search.

13.4 Measurements when Camped on LTE.

13.5 LTE Mobility in RRC_IDLE – Neighbour Cell Monitoring and Cell Reselection.

13.6 LTE Mobility in RRC_CONNECTED – Handover.

13.7 Concluding Remarks.

References.

14 Broadcast Operation (Olivier Hus and Matthew Baker).

14.1 Introduction.

14.2 Broadcast Modes.

14.3 MBMS in LTE.

14.4 UE Capabilities for MBMS Reception.

14.5 Comparison of Mobile Broadcast Modes.

References.

Part III Physical Layer for Uplink.

15 Uplink Physical Layer Design (Robert Love and Vijay Nangia).

15.1 Introduction.

15.2 SC-FDMA Principles.

15.3 SC-FDMA Designin LTE.

15.4 Uplink Capacity.

15.6 LTE Uplink Coverage and Link Budget.

15.7 Summary.

References.

16 Uplink Reference Signals (Robert Love and Vijay Nangia).

16.1 Introduction.

16.2 RS Signal Sequence Generation.

16.3 Sequence-Group Hopping and Planning.

16.4 Cyclic Shift Hopping.

16.5 Demodulation Reference Signals (DM RS).

16.6 Uplink Sounding Reference Signals (SRS).

16.7 Summary.

References.

17 Uplink Physical Channel Structure (Robert Love and Vijay Nangia).

17.1 Introduction.

17.2 Uplink Shared Data Channel Structure.

17.3 Uplink Control Channel Design.

17.4 Multiplexing of Control Signalling and UL-SCH Data on PUSCH.

17.6 Multiple-Antenna Techniques.

17. Summary.

References.

18 Random Access (Pierre Bertrand and Jing Jiang).

18.1 Introduction.

18.2 Random Access Usage and Requirements in LTE.

18.3 Random Access Procedure.

18.4 Physical Random Access Channel Design.

18.5 PRACH Implementation.

18.6 Time Division Duplex(TDD)PRACH.

18.6.1 PreambleFormat4.

18.7 Concluding Remarks.

References.

19 Uplink Transmission Procedures (Matthew Baker).

19.1 Introduction.

19.2 Uplink Timing Control.

19.3 Power Control.

References.

Part IV Practical Deployment Aspects.

20 Positioning Support for LTE.

20.1 Introduction.

20.2 Positioning Methods.

20.2 Network-Based Positioning Support.

21 The Radio Propagation Environment (Juha Ylitalo and Tommi Jämsä).

21.1 Introduction.

21.2 SISO and SIMO Channel Models.

21.3 MIMO Channel.

21.4 ITU Channel Models for IMT-Advanced.

21.5 MIMO Channel Emulation.

21.6 Concluding Remarks.

References.

22 HeNB and Pico/Femto Cells.

22.1 Introduction.

22.2 HeNB architecure and interfaces Cell planning.

22.3 RF aspects.

22.4 Interference Management.

22.5 Pico cells.

23 Self-Optimising Networks.

23.1 Coverage and capacity optimization.

23.2 Energy Savings.

23.3 Interference Reduction.

23.4 Automated Configuration of Physical Cell Identity.

23.5. Mobility robustness optimisation.

23.6 Mobility Load balancing optimisation.

23.7 RACH Optimisation.

23.8 Automatic Neighbour Relation Function.

23.9 Inter-cell Interference Coordination.

24 LTE System Performance.

24.1 Throughput.

24.2 Mobility.

24.3 VoIP Capacity.

24.4 Link Budget.

Part V RF Aspects and Spectrum Usage.

25 Radio Frequency Aspects (Tony Sayers, Adrian Payne, Stefania Sesia, Robert Love, Vijay Nangia and Gunnar Nitsche).

25.1 Introduction.

25.2 Frequency Bands and Arrangements.

25.3 Transmitter RF Requirements.

25.4 Receiver RF Requirements.

25.5 RF Impairments.

25.6 Conclusion.

References.

26 Paired and Unpaired Spectrum (Nicholas Anderson).

26.1 Introduction.

26.2 Duplex Modes.

26.3 Interference Issues in Unpaired Spectrum.

26.4 Half-Duplex System Design Aspects.

26.5 Reciprocity.

References.

Part VI Beyond LTE.

27 LTE-A.

27.1 Introduction (ITU-R/IMT-Advanced requirements).

27.2 The main features of LTE-A.

27.3 Backward Compatibility.

27.4 Deployment.

28 Carrier Aggregation and Mobility aspects.

28.1 Carrier Aggregation.

28.2 MAC Architecture.

28.3. Physical waveform design.

28.4 Control Signalling design.

28.5 UE TX/RX Challenges (include PAPR issues).

29 Advanced MIMO techniques and associated Reference Signals.

29.1 Reference Signals.

29.2 MIMO Techniques.

29.3 Feedback Techniques.

30 Relaying.

30.1 Scenarios relevant to relaying.

30.2 Architecture and Functionality of Relay Nodes.

30.3 Relay Categories.

30.4 Backhaul and deployment aspects.

Part VII Conclusions.

31 Beyond LTE-A (Matthew Baker, Stefania Sesia and Issam Toufik).

Index.

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