The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

( 33 )

Overview

What makes good people do bad things? How can moral people be seduced to act immorally? Where is the line separating good from evil, and who is in danger of crossing it?

Renowned social psychologist Philip Zimbardo has the answers, and in The Lucifer Effect he explains how—and the myriad reasons why—we are all susceptible to the lure of "the dark side." Drawing on examples from history as well as his own trailblazing research, Zimbardo details how situational forces and group ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $4.99   
  • New (3) from $28.63   
  • Used (16) from $4.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$28.63
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(2143)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1400064112 Brand new, Never used! All day low prices, buy from us sell to us we do it all!!

Ships from: Aurora, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Express, 48 States
$73.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(266)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$115.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price

Overview

What makes good people do bad things? How can moral people be seduced to act immorally? Where is the line separating good from evil, and who is in danger of crossing it?

Renowned social psychologist Philip Zimbardo has the answers, and in The Lucifer Effect he explains how—and the myriad reasons why—we are all susceptible to the lure of "the dark side." Drawing on examples from history as well as his own trailblazing research, Zimbardo details how situational forces and group dynamics can work in concert to make monsters out of decent men and women.

Zimbardo is perhaps best known as the creator of the Stanford Prison Experiment. Here, for the first time and in detail, he tells the full story of this landmark study, in which a group of college-student volunteers was randomly divided into guards and inmates and then placed in a mock prison environment. Within a week the study was abandoned, as ordinary college students were transformed into either brutal, sadistic guards or emotionally broken prisoners.

By illuminating the psychological causes behind such disturbing metamorphoses, Zimbardo enables us to better understand a variety of harrowing phenomena, from corporate malfeasance to organized genocide to how once upstanding American soldiers came to abuse and torture Iraqi detainees in Abu Ghraib. He replaces the long-held notion of the "bad apple" with the "bad barrel"—the idea that the social setting and the system contaminate the individual, rather than the other way around.

This is a book that dares to hold a mirror up to mankind, showing us that we might not be who we think we are. While forcing us to reexamine what we are capable of doing when caught up in the crucible of behavioral dynamics, though, Zimbardo also offers hope. We are capable of resisting evil, he argues, and can even teach ourselves to act heroically. Like Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem and Steven Pinker's The Blank Slate, The Lucifer Effect is a shocking, engrossing study that will change the way we view human behavior.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Psychologist Zimbardo masterminded the famous Stanford Prison Experiment, in which college students randomly assigned to be guards or inmates found themselves enacting sadistic abuse or abject submissiveness. In this penetrating investigation, he revisits—at great length and with much hand-wringing—the SPE study and applies it to historical examples of injustice and atrocity, especially the Abu Ghraib outrages by the U.S. military. His troubling finding is that almost anyone, given the right "situational" influences, can be made to abandon moral scruples and cooperate in violence and oppression. (He tacks on a feel-good chapter about "the banality of heroism," with tips on how to resist malign situational pressures.) The author, who was an expert defense witness at the court-martial of an Abu Ghraib guard, argues against focusing on the dispositions of perpetrators of abuse; he insists that we blame the situation and the "system" that constructed it, and mounts an extended indictment of the architects of the Abu Ghraib system, including President Bush. Combining a dense but readable and often engrossing exposition of social psychology research with an impassioned moral seriousness, Zimbardo challenges readers to look beyond glib denunciations of evil-doers and ponder our collective responsibility for the world's ills. 23 photos. (Apr. 3)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Zimbardo (psychology, emeritus, Stanford Univ.) is best known for a 1971 study, since called the Stanford Prison Experiment, in which student volunteers were randomly assigned to be guards or prisoners in a simulated jail. Although everyone involved knew that the so-called prisoners weren't guilty of anything, the violence and humiliation inflicted by the guards became so severe that the study had to be terminated prematurely. Here, Zimbardo explains that this happened not because the guards were bad people but because of the social situation into which they were thrust. Recently, he studied a real-life situation of his experiment when he served as a defense consultant in the trial of an Abu Ghraib guard. Zimbardo describes his own work and that of others, such as psychologist Stanley Milgram and sociologist Erving Goffman, in order to build a set of prescriptions for governments and organizations that would minimize the possibility of such human rights abuses occurring again. A well-written and important work; recommended for all libraries.
—Mary Ann Hughes

From the Publisher
"Zimbardo challenges [listeners] to look beyond glib denunciations of evil-doers and ponder our collective responsibility for the world's ills." —-Publishers Weekly
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781400064113
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/27/2007
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 6.24 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.46 (d)

Meet the Author


Philip Zimbardo is a renowned social psychologist, a professor emeritus at Stanford University, and the author of The Lucifer Effect and Shyness.

Kevin Foley has over thirty years' experience in radio and television broadcasting, commercial voice-overs, and audiobook narration. He has recorded over 150 audiobooks, and he won an Earphones Award from AudioFile magazine for his narration of Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Preface     ix
Acknowledgments     xv
List of Illustrations     xxi
The Psychology of Evil: Situated Character Transformations     3
Sunday's Surprise Arrests     23
Let Sunday's Degradation Rituals Begin     40
Monday's Prisoner Rebellion     57
Tuesday's Double Trouble: Visitors and Rioters     80
Wednesday Is Spiraling Out of Control     100
The Power to Parole     130
Thursday's Reality Confrontations     154
Friday's Fade to Black     174
The SPE's Meaning and Messages: The Alchemy of Character Transformations     295
The SPE: Ethics and Extensions     229
Investigating Social Dynamics: Power, Conformity, and Obedience     258
Investigating Social Dynamics: Deindividuation, Dehumanization, and the Evil of Inaction     297
Abu Ghraib's Abuses and Tortures: Understanding and Personalizing Its Horrors     324
Putting the System on Trial: Command Complicity     380
Resisting Situational Influences and Celebrating Heroism     444
Notes     491
Index     535
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2009

    HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED?

    This is a great read for those who are wondering how a person could become one of the violent people in the newspaper. The thorough review of the Stanford Prison Study and its relation to everyday situations is very informative. The review of the events occurring in prisons today helps one consider whether prisons are useful. It will not provide the answer, but it will lead one to decisions on its own. It is not a read for the casual reader, but more professional or with a background in psychology.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book

    The best of the best. A must read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 7, 2011

    WELL PUT TOGERTHER UNDERSTANDABLE AND INFORMATIVE

    The LUCIFER EFFECT is a very informative book well understandable and a good read for anyone who wants to know how good people turn evil.I enjoyed the part about the experiment when Philip Zimbardo put together the jail and made ordinary young men into prisoners and guards,some parts I found to be humorous and serious and at the same time educational in the way how some of the guys fell into thier roles especially the guards.I found this book to be some of what I thought about how people change and more.What i also found fascinating is the change in people is not really a change per say it's actually allready thier the change is the the outside environment that you may find yourself into an in an environment that you've never experienced and this brings out what you never thought you would be capable of doing or not doing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 17, 2009

    The book was well written and informative.

    Zimbardo describes his Stanford prison experiment and then compares it with real life situations. The theories and methods used are discussed as well as similar experiments. The book was very helpful for my research paper.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    ...

    It is interesting how we as human beings can change within no time or very little time.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2007

    Zimbardo's 'Lucifer' is a Winner

    A page-turner, ¿can¿t put it down¿ book -- ¿The Lucifer Effect¿ HAS IT ALL! Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Psychology Professor Emeritus at Stanford University, identifies what can lead otherwise normal individuals to act in a cruel, evil manner. He gives you ¿behind the scenes,¿ running commentary and analysis of his famous Stanford Prison Experiment, along with what occurred at Abu Ghraib prison ¿ and the parallels are both frightening and captivating. Zimbardo satisfies any type of reader ¿ one who wants an in-depth analysis, as well as one who is curious how humanity can sink to such a low ¿ and he demonstrates how the situations in which we find ourselves can often impact our behavior and attitudes. All in an extremely and enjoyable style ¿ it¿s as if he¿s at your side, offering his ¿take¿ on these horrendous events and life itself. Fascinating stuff. And, miraculously, while these are real events, the book has all the SUSPENSE that one would desire from a novel, leading the reader to think -- a great read indeed. Adding to this, Dr. Zimbardo offers us hope in his assessment of how heroes can emerge by breaking free and resisting situational forces. A treat after visiting the dark side of humankind. A highly enjoyable and thought-provoking book, a journey with the advantage of Zimbardo¿s brilliant mind at its helm. Strongly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    I think that ¿The Lucifer Effect¿ by Philip Zimbardo is a must r

    I think that “The Lucifer Effect” by Philip Zimbardo is a must read for anyone who wants and insight into how people can change from a respectable person to someone who is evil or bordering evil. This may be a question you have asked yourself or not, but this book asks you to ask yourself if you are “capable of evil” [3 Zimbardo]. This can be a scary question but one worth asking. This question is one that we may not have asked ourselves if not for this book. I don’t think whoever wrote “ Zimbardo's 'Lucifer' is a Winner” could have said it better when he/she mentioned “ He gives you ¿behind the scenes,¿ running commentary and analysis of his famous Stanford Prison Experiment, along with what occurred at Abu Ghraib prison ¿ and the parallels are both frightening and captivating.”  [Anonymous] because this book gives you this amazing unique insight to what the real prisoners might have been feeling and what was actually documented in a “similar” environment.  This book is also great because of the amount of information Dr. Zimbardo gives in the preface and also in the footnotes that have corresponding info about journal entries and ect. While the commentary that goes along with the experiment really gives the reader a sense of perspective change that can change your thinking and how you interpret the book and experiment. For example I found myself sympathizing with the prisoners but being able to also hear about the guards really made not sympathize any less but it the guards more human. They became people and not just guards which you need to realize if you want to keep an open mind throughout the experiment especially during counts. One of the best parts of this book is how it makes you see yourself and your everyday actions in a new light.   I find that in this whole book one quote the Dr. Zimbardo didn’t even write himself stood out to me the most and I hope that it will have a lasting effect on my life because it changes the way you think of each of your daily actions.  “Evil is knowing better but doing worse.”  [Irving Sarnoff]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2013

    Thought provoking

    I read this book when i was sixteen, it opened my eyes that the world isn't a totally innocent thing like i thought, it delves deeply into the psyche of being "evil". The study with the students is what caught my eye, i would definately tell someone interested to read this book. Although there is plenty graphic descriptions of death and other things that might make your stomach twist.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 19, 2011

    Interesting but a difficult, dense read

    While the concept and the experiment itself are extremely interesting, Zimbardo's manifesto of the course of the experiment is dense, repetitive and clearly not meant to be marketed to readers outside the academic reading field. If you can stick through the chapter long explanations of what the next four chapters will be about, the content is worth struggling through. As someone who often reads academic papers and almost exclusively reads dense nonfiction, even I found it difficult to make the trek all the way until the end. Though, in the end, I was happy I read it I wish it hadn't been such a trial to make it there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 27, 2010

    a great read

    an intellectual and intriguing look at the causes of evil deeds and the circumstances that provoke them. I love this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    There Is Only One Word To Describe This...

    That word would be shocking. I sat through the first 200 pages amazed at the way that what should be normal decent people can degenerate into people that even they wouldn't recognize. This marks the second book that I have read that has amazed me by reflecting the possibility of the human character. The other book is "When God Stopped Keeping Score." Take a moment to check it out for yourself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Informative, However Monotonous and Flat

    In this book, Zimbardo discloses an arsenal of information that most of the population would be ignorant of, but a more studious reader would consider the latest in sociological research. However, that aside, the book begins by driving the point to home base, especially with the Stanford Prison Experiment, beating the dead horse at nearly every point afterward. Zimbardo clearly has the best intentions and some very unique ideas of heroism, but in presenting his opinions, he proves to be an incompetent writer, repeating his main idea annoyingly much and lacking an advanced vocabulary. Zimbardo succeeds in shining light on dirt under the rug, but he fails in keeping the reader engaged to the last page of the book; although, I'll never forget reading about the Stanford Prison Experiment.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)