Lucinda's Authentic Jamaican Kitchen

Lucinda's Authentic Jamaican Kitchen

4.0 1
by Lucinda Scala Quinn, Quentin Bacon
     
 

The cohost of the PBS series Everyday Food unlocks the secrets of Jamaican cooking in a gorgeous, gifty full-color package

Where classic Jamaican foods like "jerk" chicken were once unknown to American consumers, today Caribbean food products and restaurants are increasingly familiar and popular. Now this cookbook shares Jamaica's authentic cooking styles,

Overview


The cohost of the PBS series Everyday Food unlocks the secrets of Jamaican cooking in a gorgeous, gifty full-color package

Where classic Jamaican foods like "jerk" chicken were once unknown to American consumers, today Caribbean food products and restaurants are increasingly familiar and popular. Now this cookbook shares Jamaica's authentic cooking styles, exciting flavor combinations, and lively spirit of island culture. It's filled with soul-satisfying recipes that are easy to make, beautiful food and atmospheric photos, and vivid descriptions of Jamaica's roadside vendors, jerk stops, and other scenes-a must for Caribbean food lovers and culinary adventurers.

Lucinda Scala Quinn (New York, NY) leads the food department of Martha Stewart Living, Wedding, and Kids magazines, and cohosts the new PBS series Everyday Food. She travels regularly to Jamaica to pursue her passion for Jamaican food.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"...recipes for the most popular roadside food...readable recipe head notes." (Library Journal, February 15, 2006)

Culled from Quinn's Jamaican Cooking, published in 1997, this slim collection of Jamaican recipes reflects Quinn's love affair with Jamaican food and culture. The introduction moves from the origins of Jamaican cooking styles—which span diverse ethnic traditions—to a tour of roadside stops where specialties include Fish Tea, a savory hot broth, and pork, chicken or sausage with jerk sauce. Recipes such as Chicken Fricasee, Codfish Fritters, Stewed Fish, and Pepper Shrimp or Curry Shrimp can be made with readily available ingredients, but in cases where more unusual ingredients are needed—bammy, bread made from grated cassava; or callaloo, a hearty, firm leafy green—Quinn describes the ingredient and offers suggestions for substitutions. Scotch bonnets, small but very spicy-hot peppers, are called for in many recipes, reinforcing the notion that Jamaican food is hot and making readers thankful for the inclusion of enticing recipes for refreshing beverages such as Pineappleade and Ginger Beer. Although the book may not succeed in convincing home cooks brand new to Jamaican cuisine to try it—the head notes are flat, and the book lacks energy—those already converted will enjoy these recipes. (Apr.) (Publishers Weekly, January 2, 2006)

Publishers Weekly
Culled from Quinn's Jamaican Cooking, published in 1997, this slim collection of Jamaican recipes reflects Quinn's love affair with Jamaican food and culture. The introduction moves from the origins of Jamaican cooking styles-which span diverse ethnic traditions-to a tour of roadside stops where specialties include Fish Tea, a savory hot broth, and pork, chicken or sausage with jerk sauce. Recipes such as Chicken Fricasee, Codfish Fritters, Stewed Fish, and Pepper Shrimp or Curry Shrimp can be made with readily available ingredients, but in cases where more unusual ingredients are needed-bammy, bread made from grated cassava; or callaloo, a hearty, firm leafy green-Quinn describes the ingredient and offers suggestions for substitutions. Scotch bonnets, small but very spicy-hot peppers, are called for in many recipes, reinforcing the notion that Jamaican food is hot and making readers thankful for the inclusion of enticing recipes for refreshing beverages such as Pineappleade and Ginger Beer. Although the book may not succeed in convincing home cooks brand new to Jamaican cuisine to try it-the head notes are flat, and the book lacks energy-those already converted will enjoy these recipes. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Quinn (Jamaican Cooking) is food editor of Martha Stewart's Living, Weddings, and Kids magazines and one of the hosts of the PBS series Everyday Food. She describes her new book as the "smaller, full-color version of the original," including her recipes for the most popular roadside food and snacks as well as main courses, desserts, and drinks. Quinn has traveled to Jamaica frequently over the last 20 years, and she refers to the book as "an ode to the country I love so much." Along with the recipes, there is a brief introduction to the cuisine and its culinary history, and the readable recipe head notes contain additional information. Color photographs of the island's food and people provide further context. Recommended for most collections. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471749356
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/17/2006
Edition description:
Revised Edition
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"...recipes for the most popular roadside food...readable recipe head notes." (Library Journal, February 15, 2006)

Culled from Quinn's Jamaican Cooking, published in 1997, this slim collection of Jamaican recipes reflects Quinn's love affair with Jamaican food and culture. The introduction moves from the origins of Jamaican cooking styles—which span diverse ethnic traditions—to a tour of roadside stops where specialties include Fish Tea, a savory hot broth, and pork, chicken or sausage with jerk sauce. Recipes such as Chicken Fricasee, Codfish Fritters, Stewed Fish, and Pepper Shrimp or Curry Shrimp can be made with readily available ingredients, but in cases where more unusual ingredients are needed—bammy, bread made from grated cassava; or callaloo, a hearty, firm leafy green—Quinn describes the ingredient and offers suggestions for substitutions. Scotch bonnets, small but very spicy-hot peppers, are called for in many recipes, reinforcing the notion that Jamaican food is hot and making readers thankful for the inclusion of enticing recipes for refreshing beverages such as Pineappleade and Ginger Beer. Although the book may not succeed in convincing home cooks brand new to Jamaican cuisine to try it—the head notes are flat, and the book lacks energy—those already converted will enjoy these recipes. (Apr.) (Publishers Weekly, January 2, 2006)

Meet the Author


LUCINDA SCALA QUINN is Senior Vice President and Editorial Director of food at Martha Stewart Omnimedia. She has authored four books, Lucinda’s Rustic Italian Kitchen, Lucinda’s Authentic Jamaican Kitchen, Mad Hungry: Feeding Men & Boys, and Mad Hungry Cravings. Her TV show Mad Hungry: Bringing Back the Family Meal is distributed worldwide, and she is the SVP,  Executive Editorial Director Food and Entertaining at Martha Stewart Living.

QUENTIN BACON is a top food photographer whose work has appeared in magazines such as Food & Wine and Real Simple as well as in many cookbooks, including Barefoot in Paris by Ina Garten, Holiday Food by Mario Batali, R.S.V.P. by Nan Kempner, Cakewalk by Margaret Braun, Our Latin Table by Fernando Saralegui, and Dinner After Dark by Colin Cowie. His Web site is www.quentinbacon.com.

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Lucinda's Authentic Jamaican Kitchen 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The recipes are delicious and the steps described explicitly. The book also contains colorful pictures that help to assure that you are using the correct ingredients. It certainly helps non-Jamaicans to keep the Jamaicans in the house happy!