Lucinda's Web

Lucinda's Web

3.7 7
by Dorothy Morrison
     
 

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Magic With No Expiration Date Can Be A Dangerous Thing...

Tess Logan knows magic. She knows how it works, why it works, and what it takes to make it work. But that's not all. She also knows how to make it happen. It's simply a part of who she is: For Tess Logan-despite all the other attributes that make her such a thoroughly modern woman-is a thoroughly modern

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Overview

Magic With No Expiration Date Can Be A Dangerous Thing...

Tess Logan knows magic. She knows how it works, why it works, and what it takes to make it work. But that's not all. She also knows how to make it happen. It's simply a part of who she is: For Tess Logan-despite all the other attributes that make her such a thoroughly modern woman-is a thoroughly modern Witch.

No amount of magical experience or expertise, though, could have ever prepared her for this. In fact, she never even dreamed it possible: A living, breathing set of spells cast more than a hundred years ago with enough stamina to follow her into the present day. Yet, here it is, writhing and twisting with activity, permeating every sector of her life, and slipping its tentacles into the lives of everyone she holds dear. Now, she's faced with having to disentangle each slippery strand and destroy the magic without destroying those she loves-or herself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979453328
Publisher:
WillowTree Press
Publication date:
10/01/2008
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.63(d)
Age Range:
3 Months

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Dubbed by Publishers Weekly as “a witch to watch,” Dorothy Morrison is the award-winning author of numerous books on the Ancient Arts and their application to modern life. She has won several awards for her writing and has become a favorite of readers and critics from all walks of life. Some say it’s because of the easily appreciated conversational tone she applies to her work. Others say it’s her down-to-earth and humorous approach to the subject matter. But regardless of the debate, all agree on one thing: Whether in her writing or her interaction with the public, it’s Morrison’s personal style that makes her memorable.
A practicing Witch since the early seventies, Morrison is an elder of the Georgian Tradition of Wicca, an initiate of the RavenMyst Circle Tradition, and a member of the Coven of the Raven in Flint, Michigan.
Morrison currently lives in Virginia with her husband, Mark, and their black lab, Dixie. She handles a voracious tour schedule and travels the country giving lectures and teaching classes related to Witchcraft.

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3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When High Priestess Tess Logan moves into a house near a cemetery she experiences visitors she later learns in a former life as Lucinda she was wife to Jonah. They lived on a plantation which would be passed down to Lucinda¿s daughter by her first husband.. Her first husband Emmer took slave Belle though Lucinda¿s second husband Jonah would marry her and in a jealous rage she creates a trick spell that is not completed. Another slave Mattie conjures up a trick that binds Lucinda and Jonah together for eternity.--------------- In the present Luke and Tess fall in love, but she refuses to give in to her feelings until the trick is broken. Only then will she know whether she truly loves Luke or is tricked into believing she loves him. Tess¿ best friend Chloe, an apprentice witch, tries to break the spell with the help of a ghostly assistant at the same time the spirit of Belle possesses Luke¿s sister Liza. She kidnaps Tess with plans to kill her as Luke belongs to her. Luke and Chloe¿s police officer husband search for Tess while a ghost, who cares for Lucinda, watches over Tess while hoping to free her from Liza¿s grip.------------------ Though the cast can be a bit confusing in terms of who¿s who past and present, fans will enjoy this entertaining reincarnation ghost tale wondering whether Tess will be freed of the curse and if yes will love turn bitter or remain sweet. Mindful of the Branagh-Thompson film Dead Again, the premise of a love triangle in a reincarnation scenario is cleverly executed by Dorothy Morrison as the audience will not know how LUCINDA¿S WEB will play out.----------- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being from the areas in the book it was a great read! Dorothy paints a very vivid image of the surroundings and characters. Highly recommend to anyone!
Openbooksociety_dot_com More than 1 year ago
Confusing Points of View Review brought to you by OBS staff member Verushka I have no experience with any of Dorothy Morrison’s other non-fiction works, so I cannot compare her writing to anything she’s done before. On its own merits, the premise of this book is intriguing, but once cracked open, I found so many things to dislike about the book, that the effort it takes to look past all that just isn’t worth it. It is a novel of reincarnation, dreams and spells; Morrison has the elements of an engaging and interesting book. She is a practicing Wiccan and it’s obvious that in those elements, she knows what she is talking about. However, to get to that, I had to wade through, among other things, at last count 5 different points-of-view. I stopped counting when I hit the 5th point-of-view. That is pretty much the biggest hurdle to enjoying this book. When done right, a first person point-of-view can be a fun, engaging and intimate look into a character’s mind. I’ve read books where the first person point of view is retained through different chapters allowing two characters at maximum a voice to show the reader how they are affected by the book, and I get it – I get the desire to show the story through the different eyes of the characters involved in the book. But seriously, it’s a minimum of 5 characters getting a point of view, not even in a first person voice, but a third person narrative. Which means, there is Tess, the main character’s point of view, in a first person narrative, before there’s a switch to a secondary character, third person narrative, back to Tess and then possibly a third character, third person point of view in one chapter. The changes in the point of view aren’t actually long enough for the reader to gain any insight into the characters at all – they’re too short to give any depth to these characters. Worst of all though, they detract from Tess, who has the main character should be supported by the characters around her. The switches in point of view are jarring, and confusing and I’m guessing since everyone in the story has some part to play in the story, the author wanted them to have a voice, unfortunately, less is more and not every character you created needs to have a voice in a book. The entire novel suffers desperately as a result. I started the book enjoying Tess, the main character. She is loud, neurotic, fun and incredibly relatable, but after a time, she is simply trying and emotionally draining to read. Her interactions with characters who are supposed to be her friends and lovers, are confusing, for she goes from a normal conversation, to screeching at them at a drop of a hat, with no good reason I can see for that change in Tess. Eventually, she presented a picture of a difficult person, who just wanted to be the center of attention with her excessive emotional displays. All the characters suffer from this, and to be frank, no-one is likable because of it. More than that, they suffer from an excessive use of question marks and exclamation marks for most of the character’s dialogues. Why? I don’t know; the author seems to not like the word “said” as well. For the FULL review and more at openbooksociety dot com
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