Lucky Girl

Lucky Girl

3.6 6
by Mei-Ling Hopgood
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Adopted when she was a baby, Mei-Ling Hopgood grew up in the Midwest and was never really curious about her Asian roots. Then one day, when she was in her twenties, her birth family came calling-on the phone, on the computer, by fax-in a language she didn't understand. The Wangs wanted her to return home. But this unexpected reunion has a price: she uncovers

See more details below

Overview

Adopted when she was a baby, Mei-Ling Hopgood grew up in the Midwest and was never really curious about her Asian roots. Then one day, when she was in her twenties, her birth family came calling-on the phone, on the computer, by fax-in a language she didn't understand. The Wangs wanted her to return home. But this unexpected reunion has a price: she uncovers secrets that haunt them to this day.

Delving into Chinese culture and tradition, Hopgood tells a tale of love, frustration, hilarity, deep sadness, and great discovery as she comes to understand the true meaning of family.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“With concise, truth-seeking deftness of a seasoned journalist, Mei-Ling delves into the political, cultural and financial reasoning behind her Chinese birth parents' decision to put her up for adoption. . . Cut with historical detail and touching accounts of Mei-Ling's "real" family, the Hopgoods, Lucky Girl is a refreshingly upbeat take on dealing with the pressures and expectations of family, while remaining true to oneself. Simple, to the point and uncluttered of the everyday minutiae, Mei-Ling Hopgood nails the concept of becoming one's own.”—Detroit Metro Times

"An award-winning writer recounts her experience as one of the first Chinese babies adopted in the West and her surprising trail back to the rural Taiwanese family who gave her away . . . A great book." —Good Housekeeping

"Enchanting . . . Hopgood's story entices not because it's joyful but because she is honest, analytical and articulate concerning her ambivalence about and eventual acceptance of both her families and herself." —Louisville Courier-Journal

Good Housekeeping
”A journalist by trade, Hopgood pushes herself to ask tough questions. As she does, shocking family secrets begin to spill forth. . . Brutally honest. . . Although Hopgood’s memoir is uniquely her own, multiple perspectives on adoption saturate the book.” –Bust magazine

Detroit Metro Times
Mei-Ling Hopgood "writes with humor and grace about her efforts to understand how biology, chance, choice and love intersect to delineate a life. A wise, moving meditation on the meaning of family, identity and fate." –Kirkus

Louisville Courier-Journal
“An award-winning writer recounts her experience as one of the first Chinese babies adopted in the West and her surprising trail back to the rural Taiwanese family who gave her away. . . A great book.”—Good Housekeeping

Kirkus Reviews
Buenos Aires-based journalist Hopgood looks back at her reconnection with the Chinese parents who gave her up for adoption. After arriving from Taiwan as a baby in 1974, the author lived an all-American life in the Michigan suburbs with two adoring parents and two adopted Korean brothers. She had recently graduated from college and started work as a reporter at the Detroit Free Press in 1995, when she met the nun who had arranged her adoption. Sister Maureen persuaded the initially reluctant Hopgood to make contact with her birth family, and correspondence eventually led to a 1997 visit to Taiwan. An imperious father, a docile mother, six chattering sisters and an adopted brother welcomed her. She reveled in the intimacy of sisterhood and the cacophony of an extended family, and its secrets unfolded over time. Her biological father was obsessed with having a son, as Chinese tradition dictated. But the baby girls kept coming, so he pressured his wife to put up two of them for adoption-Hopgood and a younger sister who ended up in Switzerland. The boy they adopted in hopes that he would continue the family name was mentally impaired by a childhood fever. (When the author visited, he was still living at home, with few prospects for marriage.) After that, Hopgood learned, the father brought another woman to live with them, but she didn't bear a son either and eventually left. On a visit in 2004, the author had another shock. Her father had recently confessed to having a son with yet another woman, now dying of cancer, and bullied his wife into allowing the boy to live with them. Hopgood grew to love her sisters, but she had a harder time with her deeply flawed father and maddeningly passivemother; she still thought of her adoptive parents as her true mom and dad. She writes with humor and grace about her efforts to understand how biology, chance, choice and love intersect to delineate a life. A wise, moving meditation on the meaning of family, identity and fate. Agent: Larry Weissman/Larry Weissman Literary
Bust
”A journalist by trade, Hopgood pushes herself to ask tough questions. As she does, shocking family secrets begin to spill forth. . . Brutally honest. . . Although Hopgood’s memoir is uniquely her own, multiple perspectives on adoption saturate the book.” –Bust magazine

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565129825
Publisher:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Publication date:
06/15/2010
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
922,751
Product dimensions:
8.26(w) x 5.54(h) x 0.73(d)

Videos

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A compelling, honest, and very human tale about self-identity and the complex concept of family." — Kathleen Flinn, author of The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >