Lucy Rescued

Lucy Rescued

5.0 1
by Harriet Ziefert, Barroux
     
 

When Lucy is adopted from the local animal shelter, her new family thinks that they have chosen a perfect pet. And she is, right up to the minute she starts to howl, and howl, and howl some more. Treats, tricks, a soft red bed, lullabies, and even doggy therapy cannot stop her "Wah-ooo-ooo-roo!" It is the little girl figures out that Lucy needs a comfy friend (her

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Overview

When Lucy is adopted from the local animal shelter, her new family thinks that they have chosen a perfect pet. And she is, right up to the minute she starts to howl, and howl, and howl some more. Treats, tricks, a soft red bed, lullabies, and even doggy therapy cannot stop her "Wah-ooo-ooo-roo!" It is the little girl figures out that Lucy needs a comfy friend (her own stuffed animal) and Lucy who figures out that she needs as many as she can get her paws on. And then, all is well.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“WAH-OOO-OOO-ROO!” That’s the nonstop howl that Lucy, a rescued pound puppy has been emitting since arriving in her new home—and her well-meaning adoptive family is at wits’ end. In a particularly inspired touch, Barroux shows the howling onomatopoeia literally clogging the air and piling up on the floor as the confounded humans wonder: what if there’s no cure for Lucy’s misery? what if—gasp—she has to go back to the pound? This is the fourth pairing for Barroux and Ziefert, who collaborated most recently on My Dog Thinks I’m a Genius (2011), and once again they’re hand-in-glove. With luminous, naïf watercolors (Lucy is essentially one rectangle balanced on another) and restrained prose, they effortlessly balance poignancy and comedy, making the Keatonesque Lucy as sympathetic as she is enigmatic. So skillful are they in setting the scene and building suspense that when the young narrator finally stumbles on a way to end the howling (“Lucy, I think you need a friend”), a sense of joyful relief should wash over readers, much as it does for the fictional family. Ages 4–up. (June)
Children's Literature - Kristi Bernard
Lucy is a puppy at the dog pound. Her days are numbered. She seems harmless enough. The black spot surrounding her eye makes her adorable. A little girl and her parents stop by the shelter and adopt Lucy. The little girl shows Lucy around her new home. Out of nowhere that evening Lucy begins to howl a horrific howl. Morning, noon and night the howling went on and on. The little girl and her parents tried everything to stop it. Nothing worked; not even a doggy psychologist. One night the little girl presented Lucy with a simple toy for her to snuggle with and the howling stopped. Soon Lucy was given toy after toy just to make sure she was happy and the howl would be no more. But when one of Lucy's favorite toys comes up missing, the howling begins again. Parents will enjoy sharing this hilarious story with a child. Kids can flip through the pages to find the missing toy. Young readers will have fun howling along with Lucy. Simple sentences and wonderful drawings make this a fun read for anyone. Parents could also consider talking to young children about pet adoption and care. A word of warning to parents and teachers, you may have to find a toy for those little ones to stop their howling.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Lucy, a small white dog with a black spot over one eye, is adopted from the animal shelter and taken to her new home by a young girl and her father. When the barking of a neighbor's dog scares her, the pup begins to howl and howl and howl. The girl puts on earmuffs, as Lucy's "Wah-ooo-ooo-roo" fills the air. As the story progresses, the word is written countless times, covering the big orange chair, the kitchen counter, and the couch and floor of the dog psychologist's office. Unfortunately the homemade treats, the comfy dog bed, and the soft lullabies are no help at all. Just when the long-suffering parents think Lucy may have to go back to the shelter, the little girl offers the unhappy little dog a stuffed animal, and the howling stops. Lucy loves this new friend and soon has quite a collection, including the child's toy giraffe. Youngsters will sigh with relief when Lucy at last becomes the perfect puppy. The whimsical cartoon illustrations are done in a combination of muted and bright colors, and the repeated use of the dog's sad howl is very moving. While the simple text will appeal to emerging readers, this story of a difficult pet settling into a new home is also a perfect fit for storytimes.—Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781609051877
Publisher:
Blue Apple Books
Publication date:
03/27/2012
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
964,110
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Harriet Ziefert's debut title was A New Coat for Anna, published by Knopf. Since that time she has authored well over 200 children's books and became the visionary founder of Blue Apple Books. The author lives in South Orange, NJ.

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Lucy Rescued 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Mouse15 More than 1 year ago
Super Darling picture book for animal lovers big or small. Illustrations are so sweet and well done. Sweet story !!