Lucy's Picture

Lucy's Picture

by Nicola Moon, Alex Ayliffe
     
 

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Can Lucy make a picture just right for her grandfather? Lucy's grandfather is coming to visit, and she wants to surprise him with a picture. At school Lucy's friends are busy with paints, but Lucy needs to make something very different--something her grandfather can appreciate, even though he is blind. All it takes is a little imagination.

Overview

Can Lucy make a picture just right for her grandfather? Lucy's grandfather is coming to visit, and she wants to surprise him with a picture. At school Lucy's friends are busy with paints, but Lucy needs to make something very different--something her grandfather can appreciate, even though he is blind. All it takes is a little imagination.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Vision is only one means of experiencing one's surroundings, imply the author and artist of this affecting story. When Lucy's class gets ready ``to do some painting,'' Lucy asks to work instead on a collage for her grandfather. Soft reds and blues predominate in Ayliffe's torn-paper collage art, which shows the girl rummaging amid cloth scraps for the perfect items (``She liked plunging her hands deep in the box and feeling with her eyes shut''), then sacrificing her outside playtime to collect ``twigs, leaves, and two small feathers.'' In a final burst of creativity (though not a recommended artistic maneuver), Lucy snips a lock of her hair to simulate a golden retriever's coat. The pictured pooch is her blind grandfather's seeing-eye dog; examining her tactile portrait (reproduced on one of the final pages) a proud Grandpa observes, ``It's the best picture I've ever seen.'' Both Ayliffe's expressive compositions and Moon's straightforward prose-which admirably presents a physical disability here without attendant emotion-convey Lucy's distinctive intensity; her example might well inspire youngsters to fashion similar projects. Ages 3-7. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Lucy is joyous about her grandfather's impending visit and determined to make him a very special picture. When her teacher suggests bright colors, Lucy insists on making a collage, "plunging her hands deep into the scrap box and feeling with her eyes shut." It's not until the story's end that the exuberant Lucy places the picture in her blind grandfather's hand and guides his fingers over her picture. Delighted, he remarks, "It's the best picture I've ever seen."
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Lucy wants to make something special for her grandfather. While the rest of the class paints, she asks to ``...stick things on to make a picture.'' In making her collage, she uses soft velvet for hills and a shiny blue material for a lake. At recess she collects twigs, sand, and feathers. When her teacher isn't looking, she even snips a piece of her own hair to add because it's the color of her grandfather's dog. At the end of the day, her mother and grandfather come to meet her, and the special reason for making a textured painting is revealed-the man is blind. Ayliffe's illustrations are simple but colorful, using a raggedy-edged, paper-collage technique. A gallery of bright children's artwork decorates the endpapers and sets the tone of the book. There are many things that make this title a positive joy-Lucy's relationship with her grandfather; the openness of her teacher, who allows her to do something different from the other children; and the little girl's total involvement in creating a work of art.-Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140557695
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/28/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.40(w) x 8.79(h) x 0.15(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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