Luftwaffe over America: The Secret Plans to Bomb the United States in World War II

Luftwaffe over America: The Secret Plans to Bomb the United States in World War II

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by Manfred Griehl
     
 

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The plans that Nazi Germany had to raid and bomb New York and the eastern seabord are revealed in this book. They depended upon the use of transoceanic aircraft, such as the six-engined Ju 390, Me 264 or Ta 400, but the Third Reich was unable to produce these machines in sufficient numbers. If the Soviet Union had been conquered, however, these plans would have

Overview


The plans that Nazi Germany had to raid and bomb New York and the eastern seabord are revealed in this book. They depended upon the use of transoceanic aircraft, such as the six-engined Ju 390, Me 264 or Ta 400, but the Third Reich was unable to produce these machines in sufficient numbers. If the Soviet Union had been conquered, however, these plans would have become a reality. With the seizure of vital resources from the Soviet Union the Wehrmacht would have had enough fuel and material to mass-produce giant bomber aircraft: it was a near-run thing. The collapse of the Wehrmacht infrastructure and the premature end of the Thousand Year Reich ensured that plans for long-range remote-controlled missiles never got past the drawing board. Manfred Griehl makes it clear that until the collapse numerous secret research laboratories seem to have worked in parallel developing nuclear power and explosives. Only classified material held within British, French and American archives can prove whether these laboratories were close to perfecting small atomic explosives. But, without a shadow of a doubt, Germany was far more technologically advanced by the end of 1944 than has been previously suspected.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Using extensive primary and secondary sources, Griehl (Fighters over Russia) argues that by the end of World War II, Germany was much more technologically advanced than many believed and had plans to develop long-range aircraft. He uses a chronological approach to describe these efforts, revealing the many obstacles facing the Germans, particularly the lack of resources and the Luftwaffe's ever-changing priorities, which ranged from short-range bombers for the Russian campaign to fighters for countering the Allied invasion. The author wraps his arguments and insights around a far-fetched German plan to bomb the United States to cause panic and require the installation of more defenses. A very specialized book that requires some effort to understand; recommended for libraries that already own Griehl's other works or that specialize in World War II history.-Lt. Col. Charles M. Minyard (ret.), U.S. Army, Blountstown, FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760786970
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
12/30/2006
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

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Luftwaffe over America: The Secret Plans to Bomb the United States in World War II 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
C-Dub22 More than 1 year ago
As an avid reader about WWII and especially the Luftwaffe and Nazi secret projects, I was excited about this book, and the concept (which, historically with a few changes by Nazi leadership) would have changed the world we live in today. The book itself seemed 95% about technical descriptions of the various types of aircraft in operation or under development.  It was much of the same thing over and over:  "this design will have XX range with XX payload, but requires the XX engines which are not available and was therefore shelved by the RLM".  The other 5% was fascinating in describing some of the alternative methods envisioned to attack America (and other global targets). So I was a bit disappointed overall as a purist on the topic, but perhaps for someone new to the subject it may well be a very interesting read.  There were some unique photos I had not seen before, I do wish the graphics and photos had be spaced around in the text (rather than bunched together), especially when describing a certain design.
Lady_Reader More than 1 year ago
Gift to an old WWII enthusiast. He didn't seem disappointed.