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Luke Cage Noir
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Luke Cage Noir

4.5 2
by Shawn Martinbrough (Artist), Mike Benson, Adam Glass
 

"...putting Luke Cage in this environment and tweaking his sensibilities for the era makes complete sense, and works quite well...Recommended." �Adam Chapman, Comixtreme.com

THE ULTIMATE URBAN LEGEND!

The people of Harlem thought he was dead. Or that he'd had experiments performed on him behind bars at Riker's. Or that his skin

Overview

"...putting Luke Cage in this environment and tweaking his sensibilities for the era makes complete sense, and works quite well...Recommended." �Adam Chapman, Comixtreme.com

THE ULTIMATE URBAN LEGEND!

The people of Harlem thought he was dead. Or that he'd had experiments performed on him behind bars at Riker's. Or that his skin was strong as steel. The people of Harlem think a lot of things about him. But aside from all the mystery he carries with him like an extra layer of skin, there is one thing the people know for certain: Luke Cage is a bad, bad man�and you do not want to cross him.

While he was incarcerated, the world has changed: Prohibition outlawed liquor and beer, and made them more profitable than ever. The old demarcation lines of New York's gangland turf have been redrawn and then redrawn again. And Josephine? Well...that's a story about a girl that's too tragic to tell. But it's Luke Cage's plan to find his old love and hear her story from her own mouth.

But his plans go awry when a white girl is found dead on 141st Street in Harlem. That's not a good thing in any location�but on these streets, it means there's a lot more killing yet to be done. And when the girl's husband comes calling on Cage to be a "hero for hire," Luke finds himself square in the middle of it.

Also in the middle of it all: Stryker. There's a lot of real estate between 125th and 180th streets, and Stryker runs the game. And now that his boyhood pal Luke Cage has been unexpectedly sprung from ten years in lockup, it seems Stryker could use a guy like him. Especially with a vicious enforcer like Tombstone on the loose and causing problems�big problems.

Writer Mike Benson brings the intense dramatics of his Moon Knight run to bear on Luke Cage Noir, a bristling exploration of Harlem's unforgiving killing streets during the Prohibition era. Joining him are writing partner Adam Glass (Deadpool: Suicide Kings) and noir stylist Shawn Martinbrough (World War Hulk: Front Line).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780785139423
Publisher:
Marvel
Publication date:
03/10/2010
Edition description:
Premiere Hardcover
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Shawn Martinbrough illustrates many DC and Marvel comics, including:
Superman, Detective Comics, Batman, and X-Men. Other clients include LucasArts, Playboy, and many others. In 2004, he was named one of "Washington, D.C.'s Best" by The Washingtonian. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Luke Cage Noir 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Andrew_of_Dunedin More than 1 year ago
My usual definition of “noir” involves “can I picture Humphrey Bogart playing one or more roles in the movie version”. After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly.  The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come. (This overview may sound familiar to readers of the modern day “Hero for Hire”.) Cage is hired by a Randall Banticoff to investigate the murder of his young wife. Before addressing the “whodunit” aspect of the situation, the first part of the mystery is: why was a white woman found dead in Harlem, of all places? The second: why was she killed? Then, maybe, we can address identifying the culprit. Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s. They successfully use this tableau to view and comment upon racial non-equality of the period, and how prohibition caused much social upheaval than simply whether or not one could buy a drink legally. Perhaps my only quibble with the work is that the limited use of existing Marvel Universe characters redefined in a new environment seemed to actually distract from the material, rather than instilling a bit of fun in it as did Gaiman’s Marvel 1602. Then again, from a marketing standpoint, this move was probably a necessity – I, for one, probably would have passed by this work on the shelf had the tie-in to Luke Cage not caught my eye. Kudos must also go to Shawn Martinbrough, for successfully capturing the spirit of Harlem in the 1920s and of Film Noir in his wonderful illustrations. P.S. In truth, I could imagine Bogart in this movie. I’ll let others decide which role(s) might best utilize his talents, and we can then compare notes. RATING: 5 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago