Luke Goes to Bat

( 1 )

Overview

Whenever the Dodgers play in Brooklyn, Luke goes up to his roof where he can see the lights of Ebbets Field and imagine each play in the game. Someday he wants to hit a homerun like his hero, Jackie Robinson. But the kids on Bedford Avenue won't let him play. "You're just a squirt," they tell him.
When he finally does get to play stickball with the others, he does so badly that he thinks they'll never let him play again. But then his grandma takes him to see Jackie in a real ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (38) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $31.00   
  • Used (36) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$31.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(50)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
crisp clean clear pages /pictures no rips or tears good binding book in great condition may have light shelf wear

Ships from: streamwood, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Whenever the Dodgers play in Brooklyn, Luke goes up to his roof where he can see the lights of Ebbets Field and imagine each play in the game. Someday he wants to hit a homerun like his hero, Jackie Robinson. But the kids on Bedford Avenue won't let him play. "You're just a squirt," they tell him.
When he finally does get to play stickball with the others, he does so badly that he thinks they'll never let him play again. But then his grandma takes him to see Jackie in a real game, and Luke discovers that part of being a hero is never giving up, even when there are two strikes against you and the game seems out of reach.
Rachel Isadora offers up a touching salute to 1950s Brooklyn, baseball, and one of the most inspiring players ever to take the field.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As Isadora's (Nick Plays Baseball) gentle story opens ("It was Brooklyn. It was summer. It was baseball"), Luke wistfully watches his older brother and friends play ball in the street and later practices swinging and throwing by himself. Sitting on the roof of his building at night, the African-American boy gazes out on the lights of Ebbets Field and pledges that one day he will hit a home run, just as he imagines his favorite player, the Dodgers' Jackie Robinson, doing at that very moment. One day when his brother's team is short a player, the kids begrudgingly let Luke join in their game, and he strikes out. Luckily, Grandma comes up with just the ticket to make him feel better-in fact two tickets-to a Dodgers game against the Phillies. At the bottom of the 14th inning, with the score tied (8-8), Robinson steps up to the plate and, after two strikes, hits a walkoff homer. The tale takes a surreal twist when, on the rooftop later that evening, Luke discovers that game-winning ball-and sees Robinson himself, who counsels Luke to never give up. A closing illustration of the lad connecting with a ball during a street game makes a fitting finale to this inspiring tale, likely to score points with any kid who has experienced an on-the-field disappointment-and a dream. Though they convincingly convey the story's baseball action, Isadora's spare paintings are most memorable for their portrayal of Luke's changeable, strong emotions. Ages 4-up. (Feb.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Luke is too small to join in the neighborhood baseball games but that does not stop him from dreaming about it. At night, from his Brooklyn rooftop, Luke listens to the cheers from Ebbets Field, glowing in the distance, and imagines himself hitting home runs like his hero, Jackie Robinson. When Luke finally does get to join the neighborhood game, he strikes out. Grandma reassures him, saying that not even Jackie Robinson plays like Jackie Robinson all the time. Grandma takes Luke to see his hero play at Ebbets Field and Robinson defies the odds that night and hits one out of the park. Luke decides that like Jackie Robinson, he will keep trying, too. Success is about dreaming but it is also about hard work. Jackie Robinson had to overcome many obstacles to achieve the success he did. While this book does not delve into his specific history, it does speak to both hard work and dreaming as being the key to his success. The message for Luke is clear: work hard and keep your eyes on the prize. Isadora's artwork is evocative of the time and her use of black-and-white to distinguish between reality and the dream sequences is effective. This is an ideal book for any sports lover but for baseball lovers in particular. 2005, Putnam, Ages 4 to 9.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Luke wants to join his older brother and his friends in their stickball game but they think he's too small. The boys live in the shadow of Ebbets Field, where the great Jackie Robinson plays for the Brooklyn Dodgers in this summer of 1951. When Luke finally gets a chance to substitute, he strikes out twice. Back home, his grandma encourages him, saying, "Not everyone plays like Jackie Robinson all the time. Not even Jackie Robinson." She takes Luke to a game where he watches his hero, two strikes down, deliver the tie-breaking run. Later, the boy has a vision of the slugger, who speaks to him: "Your grandma was right. You can't give up." In the imaginary scenes, Robinson and his teammates are dramatically set apart in shades of gray, white, and black, while Luke and his surroundings remain vibrantly hued. Isadora's lively watercolors with fluid lines and warm colors elevate this slight story. Luke is winsome and sympathetic, but the tale and its message are predictable and heavy-handed. The inclusion of Robinson will hold some interest for baseball fans, but Gavin Curtis's The Bat Boy & His Violin (S & S, 1998) and Peter Golenbock's Teammates (Harcourt, 1990) are better choices for young readers.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A small Brooklyn boy longs to play stickball with the big boys on Bedford Avenue. But he's not old enough, big enough, or skilled enough. Luke can see the lights of Ebbets Field from his rooftop and hear the sounds of the crowd, maybe cheering for a Jackie Robinson homerun. He can imagine it all happening right there on his roof. Finally he's asked to join a game, but he strikes out twice. His grandmother surprises him with tickets to the Dodger game, where Robinson really does win it with a home run. After the game, he's up on the roof and imagines Jackie there, encouraging him to keep on trying. Isadora's simple tale of love, baseball and determination is delightfully enhanced by her warm, expressive watercolor illustrations. Luke's wistfulness, despair, dreams and joy glow from every page. Charming and tender. (Picture book. 4-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399236044
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/28/2005
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.58 (w) x 10.42 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 10, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Luke really wants to play baseball with his older brother and fr

    Luke really wants to play baseball with his older brother and friends. But he's just too small. After a trip to the ball game with his grandmother he learns that he needs to keep trying and never give up.

    This was a really cute book. My kids both enjoyed it. The pictures are beautiful and fit well with the story. The author used word pictures to create a story that was a learning experience as well as enjoyable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)